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25 NOVEMBER 2013

DesFi (Design Fictions) MA study at QUT

"I use the term 'DesFi' as a play on 'SciFi'. In that 'SciFi' narratives and visualisations are fictional scenarios based on scientific discoveries and discussions. Im particularly interested in how the genre of 'science fiction' can provide an example approach for design students to consider when they are conceptualising potential designs for future contexts.

The DesFi approach allows design students to put aside existing limitations… such as current issues around voice recognition, language translators or even access to personal data. These limitations are based in technical, political and sometimes ethical arguments that, although undeniably critical to design feasibility, can suspend design innovations if we only consider the policies, technologies and processes that exist right now.

My premise to the students is that such contemporary concerns may be solved by another discipline in the near or far future. Consequently, attitudes will shift, new technologies will emerge and the criteria and inventory for design specifications will change.

Limiting our design ideas to current issues may dilute the potential for innovation… but more importantly, by prototyping great imaginative design solutions, we can increase the demand for change through demonstrating the possibilities that emerge from overcoming the conditions and contingencies of designing products for only todays market and todays user."

(Deb Polson, 25 November 2013)

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TAGS

2009AustraliaBruce Sterlingcommunication design education • contemporary concerns • Debra Polson • DesFi • DesFi prototypes • DesFi tangents • design educators • design feasibility • design fictions • Design Fictions (course) • design innovation • design specifications • design students • design studio programme • designing products • designing prototypes • diegetic prototypes • ethical arguments • fantasticfictional scenariosfuture contextshistory of ideasimaginative design solutions • Interactive and Visual Design Course • Julian BleeckerMA • Masters of Creative Industries • near future design • new technologies • potential designs • prototypingQUTsci-fiscience fictionscientific discoveriesscientific observationsspeculative designsuspend disbeliefwhat if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2011

Design-based Learning for Knowledge-based Economies

"in the ninety years since the creation of the Bauhaus, design educators have constantly challenged the definition of design as a discipline, consequently reshaping the mission and vision of design programs. With the advent of the Bauhaus, design emerged as the integration of artistic methods with scientific principles in order to educate a new generation of artists and craftsmen and better train them to infuse humanistic values into industrial production systems. Later, with the incorporation of design into higher education, it became a self–contained discipline as part of the arts and sciences responsible for the production of knowledge, followed by a process of branching out to multiple specializations within the design discipline. Since then, designers have graduated as experts instrumental in the development of new products and communication strategies demanded by market economies. Curiously, while in the professional context the design discipline has been interpreted as business function, in education, design and business–related disciplines such as marketing, management, and finance were separated by ideological principles and credit distribution requirements. Consequently, the design, business, and liberal arts disciplines were never combined into one program, despite the clear signals that these disciplines are complementary and dependent on each other in terms of imagining new ways of infusing social and environmental principles within resilient production systems regulated by market economies."

(Carlos Teixeira, p.560–561, IASDR 2009)

1). Teixeira, C. (2009). The Entrepreneurial Design Curriculum: Design–based Learning for Knowledge–based Economies. International Association of Societies of Design Research. Seoul, Korea.

TAGS

2009academic disciplinesarts and sciencesBauhaus Schoolbusiness • Carlos Teixeira • creative industries • design as a discipline • design curriculumdesign educators • design enterprise • design managementdesign pedagogydesign-based learningdesignersentrepreneurship • humanistic values • IASDR • ideological principles • industrial production systems • integration of artistic methods with scientific principles • International Association of Societies of Design Researchknowledge-based economyliberal arts • market economies • multiple specialisations • new products • production systems • professional contextrealisation rulesrecontextualisation of knowledge • self-contained discipline • social and environmental principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Design Research: Building a Culture from Scratch

"Conference description of the topic: A 2005 education survey by Metropolis Magazine showed no consensus among practitioners or educators about what constitutes design research; limited access to research findings from professional practice; nascent use of students as interns in the research process; and great confusion about what design issues deserve the greatest attention by researchers. Organizers of the 2007 conference of the International Association of Societies of Design Research reported that only 10% of the paper submissions came from Americans, demonstrating that the US is behind other countries in the generation of new knowledge.

Despite this confusion, there is ample evidence that research will play an increasing role in the future of professional practice and that the typical usability testing in labs and focus groups will be insufficient in informing large–scale communication strategies and technological development. Further, it is apparent that design practitioners consider research to be proprietary and that any large–scale dissemination of new knowledge must come from academic institutions.

It is clear, therefore, that much work is yet to be done in building a research culture. Traditionally, undergraduate 'research' activities have been defined in terms of existing information retrieval on the subject matter of the communication, the wants and needs of the client, and the technical demands of message production and distribution, little of which is transferrable to other projects. Further, in many programs there is limited curricular distinction between the research behaviors expected of undergraduate and graduate students, leaving the majority of master's graduates unprepared for the scholarship and knowledge generation demands of current faculty positions in research–driven institutions."

(Judith Gregory, Deborah Littlejohn et al., 10 October 2010)

Moderator Judith Gregory and writer Deborah Littlejohn have a report on Design research: Building a culture from scratch

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2007 • academic institutions • academic programmesart and design conference • building a research culture • communication strategiesconceptualisationconferencecurriculumdesign educatorsdesign practitionersdesign researchenquiryfocus groups • from scratch • graduate studentsInternational Association of Societies of Design Research • Judith Gregory • knowledge generation • masters degree • Metropolis Magazine • new knowledgeprofessional practicerequirements gatheringresearch • research findings from professional practice • research process • research-driven institutions • researchersscholarship • technical demands of message production and distribution • technological development • the wants and needs of the client • theory building • transferrable • undergraduate researchundergraduate studentsusability testing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2010

LeNS: The Learning Network on Sustainability

"Asian–European multi–polar network for curricula development on Design for Sustainability focused on product–service system innovation.

LeNs is a 3 years project (15/12/2007 – 15/12/2010) funded by the Asia Link Programme, EuropAid, European Commission, involving 7 design schools in Europe and Asia.

LeNS aims at contributing to human resources and curriculum development, in a reciprocal understanding of cultures, by promoting a new generation of designers (and design educators) capable to effectively contribute to a transition towards a sustainable society.

LeNS ambitions to promote a new shared disciplinary ground on Design for Sustainability trough a series of exchange activities among the partner institutions. LeNS consortium will jointly produce an open e–learning package (a modular and adaptable package for curriculum development with teaching materials and tools for design educators and guidelines for courses design and implementation In diverse contexts). It will also promote a series of diffusion activities targeting the design community worldwide."

(The Learning Network on Sustainability)

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20072010Asia • Asia Link Programme • Asian-European • course designcultures • curricula development • curriculumcurriculum developmentdesign communitydesign educators • Design for Sustainability • designers • EuropAid • EuropeEuropean Commissionguidelineshuman resourcesinnovation • Learning Network on Sustainability • LeNS (research project) • open e-learning package • pedagogy • product-service system • projectsustainabilitysustainable societyteaching materials

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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