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Which clippings match 'Tongue-in-cheek' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 SEPTEMBER 2013

Defined Lines: tongue-in-cheek parody of Blurred Lines music video

"A feminist parody version of Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines ... by a group of law students from Auckland University, was posted on YouTube on Friday night and had over 300,000 views at 6am this morning."

(TVNZ, 02 September 2013)

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2013 • Adelaide Dunn • Auckland Law Revue Girls • bigot • Blurred Lines (2013) • chauvinism • chauvinistic • Chillbox Creative • critical commentarydepictions of womenexploitationfeminist parodyfeminist perspectivehumourlaw student • Marvin Gaye • Miley Cyrus • Milon Tesiram • misogynyMTVMTV Video Music Awardsmusic video • Olivia Lubbock • parodyparody versionplaythingporno-chic • Rich Bryan • Robin Thicke • scantily cladsex crimesexismsexistsexploitation • sexual discrimination • sexualised depictions • sexually explicit content • The Law Revue girls • tongue-in-cheek • TV One • University of AucklandYouTube • Zoe Ellwood

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2012

Babakiueria: the colonialisation of European Australians by Indigenous Australians

"Presenter Duranga Manika (Michelle Torres) describes her fascination with white people and their customs and explains how she spent six months living with a 'typical white family' (Tony Barry, Cecily Polson, Kelan Angel, Margeurita Haynes). She also asks members of the general public for their opinions on white people and speaks to the Minister for White Affairs (Bob Maza).

[Geoffrey] Atherden's script takes stereotypes of Australian culture and, with tongue–in–cheek humour, views them as though for the first time, as mysterious, alien and strange. Here, the barbecue is singled out. Elsewhere Manika describes the football match as ritualised violence and betting at the TAB as a religion, while a police commissioner calls the Anzac Day March a ritual where white people 'honour their warrior ancestors' but wonders why it can't be done at home.

Presenter Duranga Manika's ethnographic study of white people simplifies, patronises and mystifies her subjects. Every mundane detail of this one family's everyday life is invested with serious cultural significance. Bob Maza's Minister for White Affairs compresses a history of government treatment of Indigenous Australians into one self–satisfied, authoritative figure. It is interesting that while these characters treat 'white' culture with such fascination, they treat 'black' culture as such a given that the audience does not find out much about it."

(Kate Matthews, Australian Screen)

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17881986Aboriginalalien and strangeANZAC • ANZAC Day • ASO • audio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustraliaAustralian cultureAustralian Screen • authoritative figure • Babakiueria • barbecue • Barbecue area • BBQ • belongingblack culture • Bob Maz • Bob Maza • Cecily Polson • colonial misrecognition • colonisationcultural anthropologycultural critiquecultural perspectivecultural significanceculture and customsethicsethnographic studyethnography • Euro-Australians • European Australians • fictitious land • First Australiansflagfootball • for their own good • gambling • Geoffrey Atherden • government treatment • humourIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous peopleinvasion • Kelan Angel • Margeurita Haynes • Michelle Torres • Minister for White Affairs • mockumentary • National Film and Sound Archivenative peopleNFSApatronisingpostcolonial • powerboat • racial inequality • racial profiling • religionritual • ritualised violence • role-reversal • satiresatiricalsettlementstereotype • TAB • tongue-in-cheek • Tony Barry • typical white family • untamed land • white culture • white people • white settlement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

The Internet as Art: In the digital age, the medium is the new message

"Just as video and computer technology attracted pioneering artists in the 1960s and 1970s, the Internet today is inspiring artists to tinker with the possibilities and boundaries of the World Wide Web. What started as a playful and often tongue–in–cheek experimental venture by a few code–savvy artists in the early 1990s has grown into a global art movement that is attracting attention from museums and private collectors. Karlsruhe–based media museum Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie, or ZKM, has been running a series of net.art exhibitions. Berlin's Digital Art Museum recently showed the video performance 'Hammering the Void,' by Gazira Babeli, the pseudonym for an artist who exists only in Second Life, an online virtual reality game.

Among the artists who first saw the potential for creative uses of the information superhighway were Belgrade–born Vuk Cosic and Amsterdam–based artist duo Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans, who perform under the pseudonym jodi on the Web. Their early digital works, much like the art being made today by Italian duo Eva and Franco Mattes – who call themselves 0100101110101101.ORG – often imitated or at least paid ironic homage to the clandestine machinations of computer hackers."

(Goran Mijuk, 29 July 2009, Wall Street Journal)

Fig.1 'T–Visionarium' (2003–08), by Neil Brown, Dennis Del Favero, Jeffrey Shaw and Peter Weibel

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01012003artcodecreative practice • Dennis Del Favero • digital age • Digital Art Museum • digital cultureDirk Paesmans • error message • experimentationinteractive installationInternetJeffrey ShawJoan HeemskerkJODI (art collective)Karlsruhemedia artmediummedium is the messagemuseum • Neil Brown • net artnew mediaPeter WeibelpioneeringplayfulSecond Life (SL) • T-Visionarium • tinkertongue-in-cheekvideo artvideo performancevirtual realityZentrum fur Kunst und MedientechnologieZKM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 NOVEMBER 2010

How to Lie with Design Research

"Dan Saffer, author of "Designing for Interaction", gives a tongue–in–cheek talk about the misleading ways certain design researchers present their findings."

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2008authenticitycut and paste • Dan Saffer • designdesign researchfictionhumourinterviewirreverenceobjectivityre-enactmentresearch • researchization • researchizing • scientific researchsteal from anywherethieverytongue-in-cheektruth • URF 08 • User Research Friday
07 JULY 2009

Pantalaine: Provisioners of America's Finest Plural Clothing

"I so want to believe that Pantalaine really has been 'Provisioners of America's Finest Plural Clothing' since 1950, but something tells me that they are just getting their jollies making fun of the unfortunately real Slankets and Snuggies out there. Having said that, I kind of like the idea of mutated accessories and clothing that encourages interaction with our fellow humans."
('GiggleSugar', Sugar Inc.)

[It appears that 'Pantalaine' is an invention of the US literary journal McSweeney's Quarterly Concern.]

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1950blanketclothingcouch dressfashionideal form • McSweeneys Quarterly Concern • mutant • Pantalaine • parodypersonal spacespectaclespeculative designtongue-in-cheek

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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