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Which clippings match 'Folksonomy' keyword pg.1 of 3
15 APRIL 2012

JISC Final Report: Enhancing the VADS Image Collection

"The project had three overarching aims: to improve image searching and retrieval; to enable VADS images to be accessed more easily; and to facilitate increased use of the collection by academics. To achieve this, the project has developed OAI–PMH capabilities on the VADS database; developed and applied a general top level hierarchical taxonomy to the VADS collections; implemented a combination of controlled terms and free to edit user tags; and enabled academic users to create, annotate and publish their own image sets. "

(Amy Robinson, August 2009, p.4)

Fig.1 French photographer, JR.

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TAGS

2009 • academic users • academicsannotationcollections • controlled terms • databasedigitisation • easy access • enhancing the VADS • folksonomy • free to edit user tags • funded project • hierarchical taxonomy • image annotation • image collectionimage database • image publishing • image retrieval • image searchingimage setsJISCOAI-PMHonline collectionsearchsearch and retrievaltaxonomy • user tags • VADS • VADS database

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 DECEMBER 2011

Electronic Hybridity: The Persistent Processes of the Vernacular Web

"While mass–mediated communication technologies have empowered the institutional, participatory media offer powerful new channels through which the vernacular can express its alterity. However, alternate voices do not emerge from these technologies untouched by their means of production. Instead, these communications are amalgamations of institutional and vernacular expression. In this situation, any human expressive behavior that deploys communication technologies suggests a necessary complicity. Insofar as individuals hope to participate in today's electronically mediated communities, they must deploy the communication technologies that have made those communities possible. In so doing, they participate in creating a telectronic world where mass culture may dominate, but an increasing prevalence of participatory media extends into growing webs of network–based folk culture. "

(Robert Glenn Howard, 2008)

1). Robert Glenn Howard (2008). "Electronic Hybridity: The Persistent Processes of the Vernacular Web" Journal of American Folklore, Volume 121, Number 480, Spring 2008, pp. 192–218. DOI: 10.1353/jaf.0.0012

TAGS

1990sacademic journalagency • alternate voices • communication technologiesconsumer culturedigital revolution • electronic hybridity • electronic mediation • electronic technologiesexpressionfolklorefolksonomy • human expressive behaviour • hybrid formhybridity • image reproduction • instantaneousInternet • John Dorst • Journal of American Folklore • mass culture • mass distribution • mass media • mass-mediated communication technologies • medium is the messagemodes of communication • network-based folk culture • new communication technologies • new mediaparticipatory Internet mediaparticipatory mediaremediationsocial networking tools • technologies of cultural reproduction • telectronic age • telectronic world • vernacular • vernacular expression • vernacular production • vernacular web • webwiki

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2011

Folksonomies: improving tagging technique

"Here are some of the techniques used by professionals:

Universe – knowing the complete vocabulary, so you know what categories are available

Synonyms – that one of the meanins of ultrasound is the same as sonography.

Hierarchy – a Volvo is a kind of car, is a kind of transportation device.

So here are some ideas for how we could improve folksonomy software to make us better at this, without involving any editors.

Suggest tags for me. A Google Suggest–style interface will help familiarize people with the universe of existing tags, so you can use an existing tag rather than invent your own, when the existing tag applies equally well. It would also reduce typos and inconsistencies, like 'blog' vs. 'blogs', and it might serve as inspiration to get past the obvious tags. The pool of tags suggested from could be a weighted list of my own tags, my friends' tags, all tags, and tags other people have already used for this link.

Find synonyms automatically. In the browsing interface, Flickr is pretty good about showing related tags. Why not show these related tags when I am tagging a photo, thus making it easy for me to just add the ones that apply. They could even do a quick lookup on WordNet for more synonyms. Since the related tags in the browsing interface feeds off of tags used on the same images on the input side, this would also help make strong links stronger.

Help me know what tags other people use. When doing both the Google Suggest and the synonyms above, show the most used tags in a larger size than less used tags. There is value in people using the same tag for the same thing, and we want to encourage that, without in any way preventing people from choosing different tag if they want to.

Infer hiearchy from the tags. I have a habit of using multiword tags, so instead of saying 'socialsoftware' like you're supposed to on delicious, I say 'social software', which really makes it two separate tags. That's not necessarily a bad thing, though. If this habit is generally applied, we could look at home many links that are tagged with 'social' are also tagged 'software', and maybe infer that 'social' is frequently used in conjunction with 'software', and thus might imply a special kind of software (or the other way around, that software is a special kind of social), thus offering the combined tag 'social software' to contain links that are tagged with both. A different example would be items tagged 'volvo car'. If most of the time something is tagged 'volvo', it is also tagged 'car', we might infer that volvo is a kind of car.

Make it easy to adjust tags on old content. If the above and other ideas work, people's tagging skills should improve over time. So why not augment the browsing interface so that it's very easy for me to add or remove tags from my iamges or links right there, e.g. from a list of suggested tags on the page, and I'm sure that sometimes, someone would use it. Another incentive to retag my content is if I'm searching for a link on Buenos Aires, but the link wasn't tagged with 'buenosaires', so I find it under 'argentina', say, it should be very easy to add the 'buenosaires' tag to that item."

(Lars Pind, 23 January 2005)

TAGS

road folksonomies • browsing interfacecategory • conjunction • contentDeliciousFlickrfolksonomy • folksonomy software • Google Suggesthabithierarchyinconsistencies • infer hiearchy • information retrieval • interpersonal information retrieval • intersubjective meaning • link strength • lookup • multiword tags • prompting • related tags • retag • searching • social softwaresoftware • synonym • tag quality • tag suggestion • tagging skills • tags • tags other people • typos • valid tags • vocabulary • WordNet

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2011

The process of conceptualisation can be seen as an emergent process that involves the constant re-projection of prior understanding onto new and changing circumstances

"An inspiring new website for digital culture and creative practices has been created by School of Art & Design academic Simon Perkins. The Folksonomy – www.folksonomy.co – is a knowledge commons and social bookmarking tool for digital culture and creative practice. The brainchild of Simon Perkins, as part of his research, the Folksonomy simplifies the process of clipping references and features photographs, videos and published documents. The Folksonomy is simultaneously a device for engaging with and a product of digital culture. It acts as a teaching tool for supporting the generation of ideas and digital culture creative practice. The research project is of a broader practice that extends from creative technology and design teaching and is focused on the nature of knowledge construction within digital culture environments. One of the unique aspects of the site is the way content is categorised, as it simultaneously belongs to multiple and sometimes contradictory categories, encouraging the viewer to make new discoveries. This sits in stark contrast to the more traditional logic conventionally employed by libraries and computer operating systems where books and files are organised according to a linear, centralised and hierarchical form. Simon says: 'The process of conceptualisation can be seen as an emergent process that involves the constant re–projection of prior understanding onto new and changing circumstances. The Folksonomy tool aims to support this type of tactical interaction through its use of linking and association.'"

(Steve Goodhew, 2010, p.140–141)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins (2010) 'Stellarscope Constellations'.

2). Steve Goodhew (ed.) (2010). 'OPEN: 50 RESEARCH PROJECTS exploring the boundaries of creativity', College of Art & Design and Built Environment, Nottingham Trent University.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2009

Atomiq: visual folksonomy explanation

"I came up with this diagram to show the differences between tagging approaches ... On the vertical axis, we have tags and whether they are public or private. On the horizontal axis, we have the stuff you would tag in these systems (either yours, other people's, or a mixture). Flickr sits in the middle since it allows you to tag your contacts' photos as well as your own, and to keep some photos (and presumably tags) private. Del.icio.us, of course, lets you tag your own stuff if you want to. I put Furl in the lower right quadrant because it seems to be the only system that lets you keep private tags of others' stuff (properly, it should be closer to Flickr)."
(Gene Smith, 24 January 2005)

[Furl now belongs to Diigo.]

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TAGS

architectureart • Atomiq • chartdataDel.icio.usdiagram • Diigo • Flickrfolksonomy • Furl • Gmailinformation architecturetagtaggingTechnoratiThomas Vander Walvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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