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Which clippings match 'Materials Science' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 FEBRUARY 2016

Tomás Saraceno: Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider’s Web (2008)

"In his dramatic installation Galaxies Forming along Filaments, Like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider's Web (2008) Tomas Saraceno applied another analogy inspired by that finding: the comparison between our 'spongy' universe and a complex spider web in which groups of stars and other matter are strung like shining beads of water along invisible strands. Saraceno, a former architect known for following in the tradition of other maverick designers who have developed provocatively inventive projects with the goal of changing human behaviour and living conditions – such as Buckminster Fuller, Archigram and the Ant Farm group – also has a knack for presenting his conceptual projects in ways that capture the imagination."

(Kristin M. Jones, 2008, Frieze)

Jones, K. M. (2008). "Tomas Saraceno" Frieze(116).

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TAGS

2008 • airborne biosphere • alternate ways of living • analogyAnt Farm (architecture)Archigramart installationbiosphereblack and whiteBuckminster Fuller • capture the imagination • changing human behaviour • cloud formations • complex networks • conceptual projects • droplet • filament • Frieze (magazine) • galaxies forming • galaxy • inflatable biosphere • inventive projects • invisible strands • large scale workliving conditionsmaterials science • maverick designer • morphology of soap bubbles • network modelnetwork morphology • neural networks • provocatively inventive • shining beads • soap bubbles • speculative models • spider web • sponge • spongy universe • stars • Tomas Saraceno • visual representations of mathematical conceptswaterweb of connectionswhite box

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

A proof of concept of technology which is born to die

"John Rogers is a professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the university. Rogers says the goal of the 'born to die' program is to design transient technology that can dissolve at the end of its useful life, thus saving space in landfills and reducing waste. The research team isn't there yet. But it has designed a chip built on a thin film of silk that dissolves when hit with water."

(Associated Press)

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applied research • Associated Press • born to die • design innovationdesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumption • dissolvable materials • e-wasteelectronicsend of lifeimpermanenceinorganic refuse • John Rogers • material interventionsmaterial worldmaterials sciencenew materialsobsolescenceproof of conceptself-destroyingself-destructing • silk • thin filmthrow-away • transient tech • transient technology • University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • useful life • water soluble

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2013

Concrete Canvas and Concrete Canvas Shelters

"Concrete Canvas Ltd. manufacture a ground breaking material technology called Concrete Canvas that allows concrete to be used in a completely new way. Concrete Canvas was originally developed for the award winning Concrete Canvas Shelters, a building in a bag that requires only water and air for construction."

(Concrete Canvas Ltd.)

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architectural building cladding • buildingcanvas • canvas building • cement • cement impregnated fabric • civil engineering • cladding • clothconcrete • concrete canvas • concrete cloth • concrete layer • construction • durable • fabricfabrication • flexible forms • form and spaceformation and materialisation • humanitarian crises • hydrated • hydrophilic • impregnated fabric • inflatable • inflatable concrete building • infrastructurematerial interventionsmaterial practicematerials innovationmaterials sciencemutability • mutable structures • new materialsproduction and assembly • rapidly deployable infrastructure • sheltertemporary buildingtemporary structures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2010

MIT OpenCourseWare: free online course materials

"MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) is a web–based publication of virtually all MIT course content. OCW is open and available to the world and is a permanent MIT activity."

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

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2002academic community • aeronautics • anthropologyarchitecture • astronautics • athletics • atmospheric sciences • audienceauthorship • biological engineering • biologybrain sciencechemical engineeringchemistrycivil engineeringcognitive science • comparative media studies • computer sciencecoursewaredisseminatione-learningearth scienceseconomicseducational mediaelectrical engineeringengineering • engineering systems division • environmental engineering • foreign languages • foreign literature • gender studies • health sciences and technology • history • humanistic studies • initiativeiTunes UlecturelinguisticsliteraturemanagementMassachusetts Institute of Technologymaterials sciencemathematicsmechanical engineeringmedia artsmedia studiesMIT • MIT course content • MIT OpenCourseWaremusic arts • nuclear science • OCWonline lecturesopenphilosophy • physical education • physical recreation • physics • planetary sciences • political sciencepublishingrepositoryresourcescholarshipscienceteaching materials • technology and society • theatre artsurban planningurban studiesVLEweb-based publication • writing studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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