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Which clippings match 'Flexibility' keyword pg.1 of 3
04 DECEMBER 2014

Michael Seemann: Knowing Is Asking the Right Questions

"Proposition: In the Old Game, it was important who was storing which information and to what purpose. But what counts in the New Game, by that measure, is how information is retrieved. This shift of focus does not only change our attitude towards knowledge, but also touches on the power structures inherent in any kind of knowledge."

(Michael Seemann, 2014, p.25)

Michael Seemann (2014). 'Digital Tailspin: Ten Rules for the Internet After Snowden'

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TAGS

2014 • ableism • algorithmic transparency • algorithmically filtered content • Angelina Atanasova • antifragility • bad ass mother fucker • big datacommon good • control over the digital world • Costanza Hermanin • culture of the query • data • data commons • database programmes • digital tailspin • distributed realities • Edward SnowdenEli PariserEvan Rotheveryday racism • Facebook timeline • fhashtag revolutions • filter bubbles • filter sovereignty • flash mobsflexibility • Hadoop • individual standpoints • information retrieval • Jane Bambauer • knowledge is power • Kontrollverlust • loss of control • MapReduce • Michael Seemann • Open Data City • open source softwareopenness • our attitude towards knowledge • political power of data analysis • power structures • query algorithm • radical new ethics • Roland Fryer • search • search field • self-affirmative echo chamber • self-determination • selfish participants • spontaneous network phenomena • Steven Levitt • tailspin • top-down hierarchies • tragedy of the commonstransparency

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2014

University of Mary Washington's project: A Domain of One's Own

"A Domain of One's Own is a project at the University of Mary Washington managed by the Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies. Starting in fall 2013, the project allows UMW students, faculty, and staff to register their own domain name and associate it with a space on a UMW–managed Web server. In that Web space, users will have the opportunity and flexibility to design and create spaces of almost unlimited possibilities. Within the system, they may install LAMP–compatible Web applications, set up subdomains and email addresses, and install databases. In addition, users may choose to 'map' their domain (or a subdomain) to other services, such as a UMW Blogs, Google Sites, or Tumblr."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2012

Modular architecture central to Christchurch's urban regeneration

"Martin Trusttum, from CPIT's Faculty of Creative Industries, likens his ArtBox project to a game of Tetris. 'It's just like Tetris but in slow motion. They are cubes and eventually they will come together to form a precinct.'

ArtBox will be located on the corner of Madras and St Asaph streets on the old Southlander Tavern–Jetset Lounge site opposite Anton Parsons' sculpture Passing Time.

It is a rare collection of mobile and flexible modules designed by Sydenham–based F3 and will offer about 18 spaces suitable for galleries and studios. It offers a practical, timely solution to the many low–cost premises used as galleries and studios destroyed by the February 2011 earthquake. "

(Vicki Anderson, 07 September 2012, Stuff.co.nz)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2012

Trevor Hussey and Patrick Smith: The Uses of Learning Outcomes

"This paper argues that learning outcomes need to be reclaimed from their current use as devices for monitoring and audit, and returned to their proper use in aiding good teaching and learning. We require a broader, flexible and more realistic understanding of learning outcomes, better suited to the realities of the classroom and of practical use to those teachers who wish to respond to the enthusiasm of their students. To this end, a new model is produced that starts from the idea of an articulated curriculum, and embraces both intended and emergent learning outcomes. The model employs the distinction between predicted and unpredicted learning outcomes, together with the distinction between those that are desirable and those that are undesirable. The resulting account is intended to aid understanding of the nature and proper use of learning outcomes in teaching and learning."

(Trevor Hussey & Patrick Smith, p.357, 2003)

Trevor Hussey & Patrick Smith (2003). "The Uses of Learning Outcomes", Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 8, No. 3, 2003, pp.357–368, ISSN 1356–2517 (print)/ISSN 1470–1294 (online)/03/030357–12, 2003 Taylor & Francis Ltd., DOI: 10.1080/1356251032000088574

TAGS

accountabilityadministriviaaid to understandingambiguityambiguity and uncertainty • articulated curriculum • auditaudit culture • auditing • best practicebureaucracy • constructive alignment • contiguous learning outcomes • corridor of tolerance • curriculum designcurriculum development • David Megginson • desirable outcomes • effective alignment • ELO • emergent curriculum • emergent learning outcomes • enhancing learning • experienced teachers • flexibility • good teaching and learning • higher education • ILO • incidental learning outcomes • indecisiveness • intended learning outcomes • John Biggs • learnerslearning and teaching • learning moments • learning outcomesmonitoring • Patrick Smith • pedagogic recontextualising fieldpedagogypractical usepredictability • predicted learning outcomes • QAA • realistic understanding • realities of the classroom • related learning outcomes • responding to enthusiasm • student enthusiasmstudent learningteachersteaching • Teaching in Higher Education (journal) • Trevor Hussey • uncertainty • unpredicted learning outcomes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MARCH 2011

Responsive Web Design

"Recently, an emergent discipline called 'responsive architecture' has begun asking how physical spaces can respond to the presence of people passing through them. Through a combination of embedded robotics and tensile materials, architects are experimenting with art installations and wall structures that bend, flex, and expand as crowds approach them. Motion sensors can be paired with climate control systems to adjust a room's temperature and ambient lighting as it fills with people. Companies have already produced 'smart glass technology' that can automatically become opaque when a room's occupants reach a certain density threshold, giving them an additional layer of privacy.

In their book Interactive Architecture, Michael Fox and Miles Kemp described this more adaptive approach as 'a multiple–loop system in which one enters into a conversation; a continual and constructive information exchange.' Emphasis mine, as I think that's a subtle yet powerful distinction: rather than creating immutable, unchanging spaces that define a particular experience, they suggest inhabitant and structure can–and should–mutually influence each other.

This is our way forward. Rather than tailoring disconnected designs to each of an ever–increasing number of web devices, we can treat them as facets of the same experience. We can design for an optimal viewing experience, but embed standards–based technologies into our designs to make them not only more flexible, but more adaptive to the media that renders them. In short, we need to practice responsive web design. But how?"

(Ethan Marcotte, 25 May 2010)

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TAGS

A List Apart • adaptive • adaptive approachadaptive layoutarchitecture • art installations • climate control systems • constructive information exchange • contextconvergencecrowdCSS3designdesign for the screendevice • embedded robotics • Ethan Marcotte • flexibilityform and contentHTML5information in contextJackson Pollockmedia queries • Michael Fox • Miles Kemp • mobile • motion sensors • responsive • responsive architecture • responsive designresponsive web designSimon Collison • smart glass • solutionspacetechnology • tensile materials • usabilityvisualisation • wall structures • web designweb standards

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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