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Which clippings match 'Creative Practitioner' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 MARCH 2013

The role of 'the work' in research

"This is sometimes another stumbling block, particularly to the Romantic notion of the practitioner whose aim is the expression of the self. We need to differentiate between activities that are to do with the personal development of the practitioner and his or her creativity, and activities that are significant for others in the field. It is only an activity that is significant for others that can be regarded as research. Personal development does not make a contribution to the 'advancement of knowledge, understanding and insight', except in the most parochial sense, i.e. my advancement. To illustrate this let us consider the discipline of arts therapies. It is the purpose of arts therapies to improve the well–being of the client through an intervention involving the client doing some kind of arts activity such as painting, music or drama, etc. Whether the client produces art, in the sense of 'a work of art' mentioned above, is irrelevant to the process. The activity is aimed at the personal development and self knowledge of the individual and not at the advancement of knowledge, understanding and insight into some issue shared by others. Of course, the client's case may contribute to the advancement of knowledge in arts therapies, but this would be an outcome for the therapist and not for the client. In addition, the client's productions may subsequently achieve the status of 'works' but this would be incidental to their original function in connection with improved well–being. Thus I would distinguish between (1) art as therapy (for the individual), (2) art as cultural practice (the production of works of art), and (3) art as research (meeting certain criteria under discussion). It is my claim that (1) and (3), that is, art as therapy and art as research, are mutually exclusive. I should emphasise that this does not mean that I deny that there is such a discipline as arts therapies research!"

(Michael A. R. Biggs, 2003, Practice as Research in Performance)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2013

What is Practitioner Based Enquiry?

"In practical terms PRE is a process in which teachers, tutors, lecturers and other education professionals systematically enquire into their own institutional practices in order to produce assessable reports and artefacts which are submitted for academic credits leading to the awarding of degrees, certificates and diplomas of universities, colleges and professional associations."

(Louis Murray and Brenda Lawrence, 2000, p.10)

Murray, L., & Lawrence, B. (2000). Practitioner–based enquiry: Principles for postgraduate research. London: Falmer Press.

TAGS

2000 • an examination of the artefact • Brenda Lawrence • constructionist epistemology • creative activitycreative practice as researchcreative practitioner • enquiring into ones own practice • insiders perspective • intellectual autonomy • keeping field notes • knowledge on creativity • Louis Murray • making the objects • methodological approach • ones own creative practice • PBE • pedagogy research • Practitioner Based Enquiry • reflective journalreflective practiceresearch artefactsresearch in art and designresearch methodresearch reports • self-reflective • self-reflective approach • self-reflective examination • systematic approach • systematically enquire

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JULY 2012

Art directory of gallery exhibitions & contemporary visual fine artists

"re–title.com, an artist initiative founded in London in 2005, is the information resource for emerging and professional contemporary art, providing directory and publicity services for internationally focused artists and galleries.

...used daily by thousands of artists, curators, critics, gallerists, writers, media professionals, collectors and enthusiasts for research and current information."

(Re–title.com)

Fig.1 Katharina Sieverding, Weltlinie, 1999, A/D/A Process, Acryl, Stahl, 2teilig; je 190 x 125 cm, Image © Katharina Sieverding, Courtesy Galerie Christian Lethert, Koln [http://www.re–title.com/artists/Katharina–Sieverding.asp].

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TAGS

2005artart collectorsart criticsart curator • artist initiative • artists • artists directory • arts and culturearts community • arts writer • contemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary visual artscreative practicecreative practice directorycreative practitionercreative practitionerscurator • current information • directory of creative practice • emerging artistic practices • emerging contemporary art • enthusiastsexhibitionfine art • fine artists • gallerists • information resource • internationally focused artists • internationally focused galleries • Katharina Sieverding • media professionals • online art directory • professional contemporary art • publicity services • Re-title.com • visual art academicsvisual art professionalsvisual artsvisual arts organisationsvisual arts research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MAY 2011

Effective and evocative research: difference through the form and outcomes of the iterative cycles and the type of feedback that informs the reflective process

"From the differences we have described, it might be assumed that the distinction between effective and evocative research is between the analytical and intuitive. However, it is important to note that, while analysis of the problem and context tends to come first in effective research, as in all research, it is intuition that leads to innovation. And, on the other hand, while evocative research may evolve intuitively through the interests, concerns and cultural preoccupations of the creative practitioner, it is rounded out and resolved by analytical insights.

Because of this combination of the intuitive and analytical, both ends of the spectrum may draw on bodies of theory such as Donald Schön's (1983) theories of reflective practice and principles of tacit knowledge and reflection–in–action, to frame an iterative development process. However, differences can be identified between the form and outcomes of the iterative cycles and the type of feedback that informs the reflective process.

In effective research, an iterative design process may involve an action research model and prototyping (paper prototype, rapid prototype, functional prototype and so on). Each iterative stage is evaluated through user testing by a representative group of end users (through quantitative or qualitative surveys or observations of use, for example). The purpose of this testing is to gauge the artifact's functionality, usability and efficacy. The gathered data informs changes and refinements in each cycle.

On the other hand, an artist might stage a number of preliminary exhibitions, but these are not staged to gather 'data', or to obtain successively closer approximations of a solution to a problem. Instead, they are part of an exploration of unfolding possibilities. Feedback might be sought from respected colleagues, and gathered in an informal setting (in the manner of a peer 'critique'). The purpose of gathering such insights is to allow the artist to reflect upon the project and its evocation and affect and to see their work through the insights of others, which may shed new light on the practice and its possibilities."

(Jillian Hamilton and Luke Jaaniste, 2009)

2). Hamilton, J. and L. Jaaniste (2009). "The Effective and the Evocative: Practice–led Research Approaches Across Art and Design". ACUADS: The Australian Council of University Art & Design Schools, Brisbane, Queensland, Queensland College of Art, Griffith University.

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TAGS

action research model • ACUADS • analysisanalytical processart and designartistic practice • Australian Council of University Art and Design Schools • conceptualisationcontextcreative practitioner • cultural preoccupations • data gatheringDonald Schon • effective research • evocative researchexegesisexhibitionsexploration of unfolding possibilitiesfeedbackfine artfunctional prototype • gathering insights • insightintuitionintuitiveiterative design processiterative developmentJillian Hamilton • Luke Jaaniste • observationpaper prototype • peer critique • postgraduate supervisionpractice-led research • problem analysis • prototypingqualitative methods • qualitative surveys • quantitativereflection-in-actionreflective practicereflective processresearch artefactresearch designtacit knowledgetestingtheory buildingvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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