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Which clippings match 'Digital Divide' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 OCTOBER 2015

Digital Economies

Environment and Planning A 2012, volume 44, pages 1009 – 1010

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2015big datacultural anthropology • cultural labour • digital anthropologydigital dividedigital economics • digital labour • digital sweatshops • digital work • digital work practices • economic geography • economic inequality • gamed labour • geographic information science • Global Conference on Economic Geography • global Internet geography • global south • globalised production • human geography • immaterial labour • information geographies • Internet and information geographies • Mark Graham • means of production • microwork • outsourcingOxford Internet Institutepatterns of userestaurant findersocial inequality • sociocultural anthropology • space of flows • virtual labour • Wikipedia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Cafés: hybrids involving analogue and digital, virtual and real

"Terms like 'Internet café' or 'cybercafé' bring us right back to the 90s along with phrases like 'web page' or 'digital divide', which were invented to describe new hybrids involving analog and digital, virtual and real as well as the present and near future.

It's not that these terms have grown obsolete. It's rather that these 20th–century phenomena they once described have outgrown their terminology. They were born as metaphors, but over time turned into idioms, and their analog parts were the first [to] lose their original meanings. People who did not witness the emergence of the web do not fully understand why browser content is still called a 'page'. It's has also become unclear what public internet access facilities have in common with cafés, yet we continue calling them 'internet cafés' or 'cybercafés'."

(Olia Lialina, 2012–01–10)

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1990s20th century20th century phenomenaanalogue and digitalarchaeology • Bart Plantenga • browser content • cafecafescyber archaeology • cybercafe • cybercafes • cyberculture • Danja Vasiliev • digital archaeologydigital culturedigital divideDragan Espenschiedemergence of the web • Florian Cramer • Goethe Institute • Goethe-Instituthistoryhome pagehybrid formidiomInternetinternet archaeology • internet cafe • internet cafes • inventionJODI (art collective) • Leslie Robbins • metaphor • near future • new cosmopolitanism • new hybrids • obsolescenceOlia Lialina • original meaning • outgrownpage metaphorphenomenaphenomenonPiet Zwart Institute • Piet Zwart Institute Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University • public internet access • Renee Turner • Rotterdam • Rotterdam University • terminologythe pastvirtual and realwebweb pages • Wendelien van Oldenborgh • Willem de Kooning Academy • www

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2010

High Tech High: building a high-tech work force

"High Tech High was originally conceived by a group of about 40 civic and high tech industry leaders in San Diego, assembled by the Economic Development Corporation and the Business Roundtable, who met regularly in 1996–98 to discuss the challenge of finding qualified individuals for the high–tech work force. In particular, members were concerned about the 'digital divide' that resulted in low numbers of women and ethnic minority groups entering the fields of maths, science, and engineering. Gary Jacobs, Director of Education Programs at Qualcomm, and Kay Davis, Director of the Business Roundtable, were key participants in these discussions.

In late 1998 the group voted to start a charter school and engaged Larry Rosenstock, then President of Price Charities in San Diego, as the founding principal. The founding group was clear about its intent: to create a school where students would be passionate about learning and would acquire the basic skills of work and citizenship. Rosenstock, a former carpentry teacher, lawyer, and high school principal who had recently directed the U.S. Department of Education's New Urban High School project, brought a vision and a sense of the design principles by which this mission might be accomplished (see Design Principles, below).

From January 1999 to the opening of the Gary & Jerri–Ann Jacobs High Tech High in September of 2000, Rosenstock and the founding group, led by Gary Jacobs, worked in tandem. Rosenstock located a site, prepared the charter application, hired staff, and oversaw the development of the program, while Jacobs and the business community took the lead in addressing issues of financing and facilities development."

(High Tech High Foundation)

Fig.1 Christopher Gerber/High Tech High

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1996-98 • 2000business community • charter school • digital divideengineering • ethnic minority groups • Gary Jacobs • High Tech High • High Tech High Foundation • high-tech work force • horizontal relationships • innovation • Kay Davis • knowledge-based economyLarry Rosenstocklearningmaths • New Urban High School • participationpedagogypeer learningSan Diegosciencesocial practicesteachingtechnologywomenworkforceworld of work

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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