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Which clippings match 'Counterculture' keyword pg.2 of 3
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

R. U. a Cyberpunk

"R.U. a Cyberpunk" from Mondo 2000 magazine, no.10, 1993, p.30.

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1993cellular phonechart • checklist • Chris Hudak • computer geek • counterculturecyberpunk • cyberpunk manifesto • demon dialer • futurist magazine • futuristic societyfuturistic visiongadget • handset • hard-boiled hacker • laser • living in the future • mini video camera • Mondo 2000 • monocular • parody • phone scrambler • portable computer • poster • R.U. a Cyberpunk • realtime surveillance • rebellious lifestyle • shotgun • shoulder-surfing • Sony MiniDiscspoof • stun gun • talisman • technological savvy • third eye • torque wrench • utility belt • voice changer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2012

Repo Man: generic packaging in a plain pack world

"Clark Collins definition of Repo Man as an 'hilarious genre–hopping indictment of consumerism in which, for example, all cans of drink in the supermarket are labelled simply 'drink'' (Collins 2001: 36)"

(Nicholas Rombes)

Nicholas Rombes (2005). New Punk Cinema, Edinburgh University Press.

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1980s1984 • Alex Cox • alienanti-consumeristapocalyptic • apocalyptic cynicism • b-movieblack humour • Blair Witch Project • blue text • cans of drink • Chevrolet Malibu • Chevy Malibu • consumableconsumerismconsumptioncoolcounterculturecult moviecynicismdesign conceit • disenfranchised • drink • Emilio Estevez • filmfilm genre • Flipper (band) • food label • generic • generic brand • generically • grocery store • Gummo • humour • indictment of consumerism • labellow budget • memento • new wave • Otto (character) • packagingpackaging design • plain • plain pack • plain white • product packagingproduct placementpunkpunk rockpunk rock ethosrebellion • Repo Man (1984) • Requiem for a Dream (2000) • Ronald Reagan • Run Lola Run (1998) • shoppingsubculturesupermarket • The Celebration • Timecode (2000)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2012

Die Antwoord: a provocative celebration of otherness

"If Die Antwoord are a joke, they're a painfully acute one. This over–the–top South African rap–rave trio, comprising rappers Ninja and Yolandi Visser and a hulking DJ called Hi–Tek, purport to represent 'zef', a strain of working–class/underclass Boer' culture that perhaps most closely equates to our own pejorative term 'chav'.

The band's co–founder and frontman, Watkin Tudor Jones, aka Ninja, has previously appeared in a host of similar conceptual art–rap projects and situationist pranks."

(Ian Gittins, 16 November 2010)

Fig.1 Die Antwoord "Zef Side"

Fig.2 Die Antwoord "I Fink U Freeky", Directed by Roger Ballen & NINJA, Director of Photography Melle Van Essen, Edited by Jannie Hondekom @ Left, Post Production by Blade.

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Afrikaner • art projectbandBoer • Boer culture • chav • counterculture • Die Antwoord • dirtyDJ • DJ Hi-Tek (Marius Bosch) • grungy • lowbrow • lower socioeconomic status • mulletmusic video • Ninja (Watkin Tudor Jones) • othernessover-the-top • pejorative • poor white people • prankprovocativerap • rap-rave • raveshocksituationist • slur • social classSouth Africa • South African • subculturetrio • underclass • Watkin Tudor Jones • white trash • working class • Yolandi Visser • zef

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 SEPTEMBER 2011

Les Enfants Terribles: Illustrator Robert Williams

"This alternative art movement found its most congealing participant in one of America's most opprobrious and maligned underground artists, the painter, Robert Williams. It was this artist to brought the term 'lowbrow' into the fine arts lexicon, with his ground breaking book of 1979, The Lowbrow Art of Robert Williams. It was from this point, that the seminal elements of West Coast Outlaw culture slowly started to aggregate."

(Robert Williams)

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anthropomorphismartart and design practitionersart worldartistCalifornia • car culture • cartoonist • cinematic apocalypticism • comiccomic bookcomic book artistcounterculturecreaturedeviancefreaks • Gilbert Shelton • graphics • hot rod • hot rodding • illustrationillustrative styleillustratorinterviewJuxtapoz Magazine • Kenny Howard • Les Enfants Terribles • lowbrow • lowbrow art • Lowbrow Art Movement • painterphotocopypop culture artpop surrealismpop-culturepractitioner interviewpsychedelicpsychedelic imagerypunk • punk rock art • Robert Crumb • Robert Williams • Robt Williams • Salvador DalitransgressiontrashundergroundUSA • Von Dutch • Xerox • Zap Collective

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2011

Adam Curtis: the network ecology myth

"The new series, called All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace, takes complicated ideas and turns them into entertainment by the use of the vertigo–inducing intellectual leaps, choppy archive material and disorienting music with which all Curtis fans are familiar. The central idea leads Curtis on a journey, taking in the chilling über–individualist novelist Ayn Rand, former chairman of the Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan, the 'new economy', hippy communes, Silicon Valley, ecology, Richard Dawkins, the wars in Congo, the lonely suicide in a London squat of the mathematical genius who invented the selfish gene theory, and the computer model of the eating habits of the pronghorn antelope.

You can see why Zoe Williams once wrote that, while watching one of Curtis's programmes, 'I kept thinking the dog was sitting on the remote. ...'

Now he has moved on to machines, but it starts with nature. 'In the 1960s, an idea penetrated deep into the public imagination that nature is a self–regulating ecosystem, there is a natural order,' Curtis says. 'The trouble is, it's not true–as many ecologists have shown, nature is never stable, it's always changing. But the idea took root and spread wider–people started to believe there is an underlying order to the entire world, to how society is structured. Everything became part of a system, like a computer; no more hierarchies, freedom for all, no class, no nation states.' What the series shows is how this idea spread into the heart of the modern world, from internet utopianism and dreams of democracy without leaders to visions of a new kind of stable global capitalism run by computers. But we have paid a price for this: without realising it we, and our leaders, have given up the old progressive dreams of changing the world and instead become like managers–seeing ourselves as components in a system, and believing our duty is to help that system balance itself. Indeed, Curtis says, 'The underlying aim of the series is to make people aware that this has happened–and to try to recapture the optimistic potential of politics to change the world.'

The counterculture of the 1960s, the Californian hippies, took up the idea of the network society because they were disillusioned with politics and believed this alternative way of ordering the world was based on some natural order. So they formed communes that were non–hierarchical and self–regulating, disdaining politics and rejecting alliances. (Many of these hippy dropouts later took these ideas mainstream: they became the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who decided that computers could liberate everyone and save the world.)...

He draws a parallel with those 1970s communes. 'The experiments with them all failed, and quickly. What tore them apart was the very thing that was supposed to have been banished: power. Some people were more free than others – strong personalities dominated the weak, but the rules didn't allow any organised opposition to the suppression because that would be politics.' As in the commune, so in the world: 'These are the limitations of the self–organising system: it cannot deal with politics and power. And now we're all disillusioned with politics, and this machine–organising principle has risen up to be the ideology of our age.'"

(Katharine Viner, 6 May 2011, Guardian)

Episode 1: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: Love and Power', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 23 May 2011
Episode 2: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Use and Abuse of Vegetational Concepts', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 30 May 2011
Episode 3: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Monkey In The Machine and the Machine in the Monkey', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 06 June 2011

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1960s1970sabstract modelabstractionAdam Curtis • Alan Greenspan • All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace • archive footageAyn RandBBC2Bill MurrayblogsCarmen Hermosillochange • commune • computer model • computer utopianism • confessional memoirs • control societyconvergencecounterculturecultural expressioncyberspacedemocracydigital cultureecologyemotions become commodified • Esther Rantzen • evolution • expressions of power • Facebookfreedom • Georgia • global capitalism • hierarchical structures • hierarchies • hierarchy • hippy communes • hippy dropouts • hyper-consumerismideologyideology of the timeindividualisminternet utopianism • Kyrgyzstan • Loren Carpenter • machines • Mayfair Set • mercantilist economy • modern world • natural order • network ecologynetworked societynetworksnon-hierarchical • non-hierarchical societies • orderingPongpopular culture • punchdrunk • reflexive modernisationRichard Dawkinsscientific ideasself-organising systemself-regulating • self-regulating ecosystem • selfish gene theory • Silicon Valleysocial experimentssocial mediasocialist realismsociety • Soviet realism • stability • stable order • Stakhanovites • structuresystems theorytechnology convergencetelevision documentary • TUC • TwitterUkraineunderlying orderunstable • Westminster • White House • Zoe Williams

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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