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03 NOVEMBER 2010

Clay Shirky: How cellphones, Twitter, Facebook can make history

16 June 2009

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TAGS

2009cell phonecensorshipchange • changing the nature of politics • citizenshipClay Shirkycollaborationcommunicationcommunity • control of news • convergenceconversationdigital cultureempowermentFacebookgroupshistoryinnovationinteractionmedia landscapemessageNigeriaold mediaorganisationsparticipationprint revolution • repressive regimes • social changesocial constructionismsocial interactionTED Talkstransformation • transformed media landscape • Twittertxt

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2010

Chris Anderson: How web video powers global innovation

Filmed July 2010

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TAGS

2010 • Chris Anderson • creative economy • crowd accelerated innovation • cycle of learningdance • driving innovation • entrepreneurshipinnovationknowledge-based economy • league of extraordinary dancers • LXD • open sourceorganisationsprint revolution • radical openness • Technology Entertainment Design • TED • TED Conference • TED Talksvideoweb video • worldwide • YouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2009

Marshall McLuhan Foresees The Global Village

"Marshall McLuhan's insights made the concept of a global village, interconnected by an electronic nervous system, part of our popular culture well before it actually happened.

Marshall McLuhan was the first person to popularize the concept of a global village and to consider its social effects. His insights were revolutionary at the time, and fundamentally changed how everyone has thought about media, technology, and communications ever since. McLuhan chose the insightful phrase 'global village' to highlight his observation that an electronic nervous system (the media) was rapidly integrating the planet –– events in one part of the world could be experienced from other parts in real–time, which is what human experience was like when we lived in small villages.

McLuhan's second best known insight is summarized in the expression 'the medium is the message', which means that the qualities of a medium have as much effect as the information it transmits. For example, reading a description of a scene in a newspaper has a very different effect on someone than hearing about it, or seeing a picture of it, or watching a black and white video, or watching a colour video. McLuhan was particularly fascinated by the medium of television, calling it a 'cool' medium, noting its soporific effect on viewers. He took great satisfaction years later when medical studies showed that TV does in fact cause people to settle into passive brain wave patterns. One wonders what McLuhan would make of the Internet?"

(Bill Stewart, 2000)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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