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Which clippings match 'Performance Metrics' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 DECEMBER 2016

Michael Moore: Why Finland has the Best Education

"Where To Invade Next is an expansive, hilarious, and subversive comedy in which the Academy Award®-winning director, playing the role of 'invader,' visits a host of nations to 'steal' some of their best ideas and bring them back home to the U.S. of A."

Extract from Michael Moore's 2015 film "Where to Invade Next".

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TAGS

2015academic achievementAmerican dreambest practicescitizenship • civics • documentary film • duties of citizens • education policyeducation systemeducational modelexemplary models • failure of performance testing • feature documentary • find your happiness • FinlandFranceGermany • great education • homework • human rights and duties • IcelandItaly • Krista Kiuru • Michael Moore • national best practices • Norway • operation and oversight of government • performance metrics • performance testing • performativityplaytime • political provocateur • Portugalschool performanceSloveniastandardisationstandardised testingstudent-centredteaching to the test • togetherness • Tunisia • Where to Invade Next (2015)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 OCTOBER 2015

Is competition good for learning? Exploring ipsative assessment as an alternative

"Ipsative assessment is a powerful and under-used approach that provokes a radical rethink of the purposes and methods of assessment. Ipsative assessment means making comparisons with a learner's previous work to mark progress and enable learners from all backgrounds to achieve a personal best. The seminar presents a case for partially replacing competitive assessment with ipsative assessment in a dual systems approach, and it explores the possibilities and the challenges using research evidence and examples from case studies in the recently published book Ipsative Assessment: Motivation through marking progress by Gwyneth Hughes."

(Gwyneth Hughes, 07 October 2014)

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TAGS

2014 • all learners can succeed • Amanda West • assessment for learningassessment techniques • attainment • Carol Dweckcomparison with previous performance • competition and performativity • competitive assessment • conference presentation • Diane Reay • Dylan Wiliam • George Madaus • grading against external standards • Graham GibbsGwyneth Hughesimprovement against past performance • instrumental conditioning • instrumental learning • ipsative assessment • learning and attainment • learning and development • learning and teaching • learning not outcomes • learning pathways • learning process • marking progress • marks and performance • measuring individual performance • Miriam David • motivational needsmotivational theory • Patricia Broadfoot • Paul Black • performance metricsperformativitypersonal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvementRichard Sennettself-esteem • self-referential assessment • Stephen Ball • student achievement • Sue Bloxham • unequal access

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

Rank Irrelevance : How Academia Lost Its Way

"It is impossible to abandon rankings outright, since the impulse to grade things seems hard–wired into human nature. Rankings also serve an important bureaucratic purpose. University administrators crave simple metrics of performance, which help guide decisions on where to invest scarce resources. They steer students and their parents toward some institutions and away from others. Finally, they help government and philanthropists make decisions about where to award lucrative grants and donations. In other words, rankings save work, eliminating the time–consuming tasks of reading of book manuscripts or carefully learning about the substance of academic fields.

The ease of using them explains, in part, why university rankings are such big business. Today, there is a veritable cottage industry for them. They run the gamut from the simple U.S. News & World Report to the NRC approach. University rankings have also gone global: foreign scholars, new private companies such as Quacquarelli Symonds, and long–standing publications such as The Times Higher Education Supplement have all entered the rankings market to tell professors where they sit in the global intellectual pecking order. ...

stakeholders within and outside academia should take all rankings with a grain of salt. Even the most sophisticated ones have flaws and biases, and capture only indirectly and poorly important things such as creative thinking and exciting teaching. Rankings of all kinds should be downgraded in university decision–making. Of course, this means that university faculty and administrators will have to put in the hard work of familiarizing themselves with the substance of the academic fields they oversee. But doing so will ultimately produce better scholarship that also speaks to audiences outside university walls."

(Peter Campbell and Michael C. Desch, 16 September 2013, Council on Foreign Relations, Inc.)

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academia • academic fields • bureaucratic purpose • contribution to societycultural impactdemonstrable valuediverse metrics • grant money • lecturersnarrow measuresnew measurement frontier • pecking order • performance metricsperformativitypublic value • Quacquarelli Symonds • ranking • rankings • rankings market • significancestakeholdersTimes Higher Education Supplement • university academics • university administrators • university decision-making • university faculty • university rankings

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MARCH 2013

Finland's school system accomplishes some impressive feats: so what makes Finnish students so successful?

"Students get plenty of teacher interaction: Finland and New York City have the same number of teachers. But Finland has nearly half the number of students. Standardized testing is kept to a minimum: before a New York student reaches high school, he or she will have taken 10 standardized tests. Collectively, US students take 100 million standardized tests a year. Finland's only standardized test is taken when students are 16 years old. Kids have more time to be kids: an average us 5th grader has 50 minimum of homework per day. Finnish students rarely do homework until their teens. And while us elementary students average 27 minutes of recess students in Finland get about 75 minutes a day). Finland knows good teachers are essential: teachers in Finland are all required to have a Master's degree (which is fully subsidized by the state)."

(OnlineClasses.org, 21 January 2013)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

Animated Presentation Describing Grade-Based Assessment at NTU

"For the 2012 / 13 academic year, NTU is introducing a new scheme for assessing undergraduate students' work. The scheme is known as grade–based assessment or GBA.

A major advantage of GBA is that it ensures that there is a direct link between the expected learning outcomes of the part of the course being assessed and what you, the student, have demonstrated in the assessment. This short video explains this.

The specific arrangements relating to the assessment of a module will be set out in module documentation. Previously, assessed work was awarded a mark, usually a percentage. Following the introduction of GBA, each piece of assessed work will be awarded one of 17 grades.

You will be informed about what is expected of you in order to achieve a particular grade. This information will mean that feedback on your work will be clear and you will be able to evaluate your progress towards your final degree classification."

(Nottingham Trent University)

[This animated presentation provides an overview of the grade–based marking scheme which is being introduced at Nottingham Trent University for the 2012 / 13 academic year. The presentation is clearly aimed at NTU students (and refers to the university–specific VLE called the "NOW" – the "NTU Online Workspace"), despite this the clip covers issues which I expect have more general relevance to students studying at other institutions.]

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17-point marking scale • 2012academic progressanimated explainer videoanimated presentationassessed workassessmentcourse modules • degree classification • expected learning outcomes • feedbackfeedback and assessment • GBA (assessment) • grade-based assessment • grade-based marking scheme • gradinglearning outcomesNottingham Trent University • NOW (acronym) • NTU • NTU Online Workspace • pedagogy • percentage • performance metricsprogramme modulessummative assessment • summative evaluation • UKundergraduate students

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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