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Which clippings match 'Modularity' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2015

Lubna Chowdhary transforms spaces using colour

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TAGS

aesthetic qualitiesBritish artist • ceramic elements • ceramic tile • ceramic works • ceramicist • ceramicscolourcolourwayscraftcraftsmanshipdecorative artsdesign consultancyfemale artistgeometric abstractiongeometryglaze • glaze firing • hand-blended colours • hand-painted • handcrafted ceramic works • handcrafted works • handcrafting • individually crafted works • interior decorationinterior design • Lubna Chowdhary • material practicesmodularity • ready-made elements • traditional craftsmanship • truth to materialsvisual abstraction • visual geometry • visual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services

"This agreement allows you to create customized terms and conditions for different types of design engagements. Updated in 2009, it is modular to meet the needs of a growing design community involved in various disciplines.

It does not take a one–size–fits–all approach, and it is not an extensive pre–printed document where you simply fill in the blanks. Instead, this agreement acknowledges that most design firms develop their own custom proposal document for each project and are looking for an appropriate set of terms and conditions to attach to it. When put together and signed, the custom proposal document and its attached terms and conditions comprise the binding agreement with the client. With this in mind, the focus of the AIGA Standard Form of Agreement is on those terms and conditions.

In addition to being more customizable, the modularity also helps to keep individual agreements down to a more manageable size. The first two modules, Basic Terms & Conditions and Intellectual Property Provisions, should be used for all design assignments. An additional three modules are provided as supplements that can be added to the agreement as needed: Print–specific Terms & Conditions, Interactive–specific Terms & Conditions and Environmental–specific Terms & Conditions."

(American Institute of Graphic Arts)

2). AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2010

Disruptive Innovation: displacing established competitors

"Disruptive innovation, a term of art coined by Clayton Christensen, describes a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves 'up market', eventually displacing established competitors.

An innovation that is disruptive allows a whole new population of consumers access to a product or service that was historically only accessible to consumers with a lot of money or a lot of skill. Characteristics of disruptive businesses, at least in their initial stages, can include: lower gross margins, smaller target markets, and simpler products and services that may not appear as attractive as existing solutions when compared against traditional performance metrics.

Because companies tend to innovate faster than their customers' lives change, most organizations eventually end up producing products or services that are too good, too expensive, and too inconvenient for many customers. By only pursuing 'sustaining innovations' that perpetuate what has historically helped them succeed, companies unwittingly open the door to 'disruptive innovations'."

(Clayton Christensen)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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