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Which clippings match 'Film' keyword pg.1 of 33
12 NOVEMBER 2014

Remediation: current media remediates older and newer media

"It would seem, then, that all mediation is remediation. We are not claiming this as an a priori truth, but rather arguing that at this extended historical moment, all current media function as remediators and that remediation offer us a means of interpreting the work of earlier media as well. Our culture conceives of each medium or constellation of media as it responds to, redeploys, competes with, and reforms other media. In the first instance, we may think of something like a historical progression, of newer media remediating older ones and in particular of digital media remediating their predecessors. But ours is a genealogy of affiliations, not a linear history, and in this genealogy, older media can also remediate newer ones.[3] Television can and does refashion itself to resemble the World Wide Web [p.189], and film can and does incorporate and attempt to contain computer graphics within its own linear form. [p.153] No medium, it seems, can now function independently and establish its own separate and purified space of cultural meaning."

(David Bolter and Richard Grusin, 55.p, 2000)

David Bolter and Richard Grusin (2000). Mediation and Remediation. "Remediation: Understanding New Media", The MIT Press.

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TAGS

2000computer graphics • cultural meaning • current media • David Bolterdigital mediafilm • genealogy of affiliations • historical progression • incorporation • linear form • media • media constellation • media formsmediationmedium • newer media • not a linear history • older media • refashion • remediating older media forms • remediation • remediators • Richard Grusintelevisionworld wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2014

O Menino e o Mundo (The Boy and the World, 2013)

"'O menino e o mundo' é o segundo longa–metragem de animação de Alê Abreu, paulistano de 42 anos, também diretor de 'Garoto Cósmico' e autor/ilustrados de livros infantis. Para espectadores habituados a animações cada vez mais sofisticadas, aceleradas e dependentes de efeitos especiais, em um primeiro momento o filme pode causar estranheza por sua linguagem simples e econômica, ou por sua cadência tranquila, na contracorrente do mercado. Além disso, ele é atravessado por uma melancolia incomum no gênero, fazendo do olhar de uma criança veículo para uma inquietante crítica social–e confrontando o espectador com o desafio de pensar sobre aquilo que vê, coisa incomum no gênero."

(Luciano Trigo, 19/01/14)

Sofrendo com a falta do pai, um menino deixa sua aldeia e descobre um mundo fantástico dominado por máquinas–bichos e estranhos seres alienígenas. Uma inusitada animação com várias técnicas artísticas que retrata as questões do mundo moderno através do olhar de uma criança.

Suffering from the absence of a father, a boy leaves his village and discovers a fantasy world dominated by machines, animals and strange aliens. An unusual animation with various artistic techniques that portrays the issues of the modern world through the eyes of a child.

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TAGS

20132D animation • Adriana Barbosa • Ale Abreu • alone in the wildernessboyBrazilchildrens book illustrationcolourfulcritical commentarydrawing • eyes of a child • fatherfilm • Gustavo Kurlat • hand-drawn animationhand-generated illustrationshand-painted stop motion animationhand-painted styleillustrationillustrative stylemodern world • Nana Vasconcelos • O Menino e o Mundo (2013) • quest • Ruben Feffer • social critique • The Boy and the World (2013) • villagervisual spectacleyoung children

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2013

When Is Now? The Historical Present in Creative Practice

Thursday 27th June 2013, 10:00am – 4:30pm, Waterside 2, The Watershed, Bristol, UK.

"This one–day symposium explores the historical present in creative practice. In a cultural climate that valorizes the 'now' what does it mean to occupy the present moment? Our aim is to examine the present tense of creative practice as itself historical as opposed to understanding it as the end point of a linear chronological line. The symposium is motivated by a desire to pay attention to the atmospheric 'thickness' of the present tense in art, media and design practices and to imagine what kinds of experience can be articulated when what Lauren Berlant calls the 'ongoingness' of life is slowed down and brought into visibility. The symposium includes papers on the historical present in relation to painting, sound, photography, film, digital media and video."

TAGS

2013 • Betty Nigianni • Caroline Molley • chronological line • chronological sequencecontemporary presentcreative practice • Deborah Withers • design practicedigital media • Dot Rowe • film • Frank Bowling • historical present • historical understanding • inventing history • Jerry Walton • Katie Davies • Lauren Berlantlinear • linear timeline • media practicemomentmoments • moving sound • now • ongoingnesspainting • Peter Wright • photography • present moment • present tense • repetition • Rose Butler • School of Arts (UWE) • simultaneitysnapshotsoundstill imagesymposium • thickness • Tony Oursler • UKUniversity of the West of England • UWE • videovisual culture • Visual Culture Research Group (UWE)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MAY 2013

Pablo Ferro: graphic designer and film titles designer

"for over 40 years, Pablo has been putting his stamp on the moving image through works such as the opening of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove and the revolutionary split–screen montage of 1963's The Thomas Crown Affair. He has also created the opening titles for Hal Ashby's Being There (1979) and Gus Van Sant's To Die For (1995)."

(Art of the Title)

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TAGS

1963 • Academy Pictures • animation • Being There (1979) • cinemacredit sequenceCubanDr Strangelove (1964) • Elektra Studios • film • film titles designer • graphic designer • Gus Van Sant • Hal Ashby • motion designopening titles • Pablo Ferro • Pablo Ferro Films • Preston Blairsequence designsplit-screenStanley KubrickThomas Crown Affair (1968)title sequence • To Die For (1995) • visual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2013

Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art

"Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD–Rom, DVD–Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth–century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD–Rom. A novel research archive of international significance, the collection complements the holdings in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections of illuminated manuscripts and the early modern printed book, and adds to the breadth of its important collections in human sexuality, Asian Studies, and Media, Film, and Music."

(Cornell University Library)

TAGS

2002American • American new media arts • archiveart • catalogues • CD-ROMChinese • Chinese new media arts • cinemacollection • commercialisation of mass media • Contact Zones • Cornell UniversityCornell University Library • designs • digital interfaces • DVD-ROMfilmholdingsinstallation • international art • InternetInternet artmass mediamediamonographs • multimedia artworks • musicnet artnew media artnew media artsonline and offlinephotography • Professor Rose Goldsen • research archive • resource guides • soundspecial collections • Timothy Murray • twentieth-century developments • unpublished manuscripts • video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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