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Which clippings match 'Obscenity' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 FEBRUARY 2016

Retailer uses drones to playfully respond to social media censorship

"clothing retail store BUYMA recently produced a creative commercial that strictly wants you to buy their clothes. Since Japanese TV programs are legally obligated to cover sensitive body parts, BUYMA uses drones to fully censor two professional belly [sic] dancers while they dance their routine naked."

[This Buyma ad which was created for television clearly plays with concepts around censorship - both in the context of Japanese broadcast media and perhaps more importantly in the context of social media where it will likely have most traction. In doing so the ad playfully references contemporary restrictions in place on sites such as Facebook.]

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TAGS

2015ballet • Buyma (retailer) • censorshipcheekyclassical balletclothing retailercomedy of mannerscultural conventionsdancedroneetiquette • flying drone • high-technology • hoverJapan • Japanese online retailer • morality • naked ballet dancing • naughty • nude man • nude women • nudity • obscenity • obscuring nudity • online retailer • playful provocation • playfulnesspolite societyquadcoptersexual taboo • social media censorship • social shopping service • tabootv adtv advertveiledviral advisual gag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2015

Sexed up: theorizing the sexualization of culture

"This paper reviews and examines emerging academic approaches to the study of ‘sexualized culture’; an examination made necessary by contemporary preoccupations with sexual values, practices and identities, the emergence of new forms of sexual experience and the apparent breakdown of rules, categories and regulations designed to keep the obscene at bay. The paper maps out some key themes and preoccupations in recent academic writing on sex and sexuality, especially those relating to the contemporary or emerging characteristics of sexual discourse. The key issues of pornographication and democratization, taste formations, postmodern sex and intimacy, and sexual citizenship are explored in detail."

(Feona Attwood, 2006)

ATTWOOD, F. (2006). Sexed up: theorizing the sexualization of culture. Sexualities, 9 (1), 77-94.

TAGS

2006Anthony Giddens • attitudes to sex • auto-eroticism • Brian McNair • Brigid Costello • casual sex • Catharine Lumby • commercial sex services • consumption spectacle • contemporary sexual discourse • cybersex • David Bell • David Buckingham • David Evans • Debbie Stoller • Dennis Altman • diverse sexual identities • Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim • email affairs • erotic life • Eva Illouz • excitation • female sexualityfemininity • Feona Attwood • gender relations • hedonism • Hilary Radner • Imelda Whelehan • intimate relations • Jane Arthurs • Jane Juffer • Jeffrey Weeks • Jon Binnie • Joseph Bristow • Juniper Wiley • Kenneth Plummer • liquid love • literature review • Mandy Merck • Marcelle Karp • Marj Kibby • Mark Jancovich • Michel Foucault • Natasha Forrest • obscenityonline datingpersonal life • personal relationships • phone sex • physical pleasure • physical sensation • plastic sexuality • pornographication • postmodern sex • radical sexual politics • renewable pleasures • romantic encounters • romantic relationships • Rosalind Gill • Rosalind Given-Wilson • Sara Bragg • sex and commitment • sex and reproduction • sex toysexismsexual behaviour • sexual citizenship • sexual commodification • sexual democratisation • sexual desire • sexual discourse • sexual encounter • sexual experience • sexual fitness • sexual identities • sexual intimacy • sexual meaning • sexual objectification • sexual obscenity • sexual practices • sexual preoccupation • sexual propriety • sexual regulation • sexual representation • sexual sensibilities • sexual subjectification • sexual values • sexualised culture • sexualised depictionssexuality • sexualization • sexually explicit texts • Sheffield Hallam University • SHURA • Simon Hardy • Stacy Gillis • taste formations • transient pleasures • Ulrich Beck • Walter Kendrick • William Simon • Zygmunt Bauman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Pre Certification Video

"A 'pre-cert video' (Pre-Certification) is any videotape (or laserdisc/CED) issued in the UK before the introduction of the 1984 Video Recordings Act.

Pre-cert videos were not required by law to be submitted to the BBFC so the era was unregulated, leading to many uncut releases of videos which would have fallen foul of the BBFC's strict guidelines, and would therefore have been censored if submission to the board was a legal requirement.

However, whilst many of the larger respectable companies simply issued their previously BBFC certificated cinema releases onto video to play safe as they feared there was bound to be a clampdown at some stage, some of the smaller independent companies decided to take advantage of the unregulated video rentals market by issuing 'strong uncut' versions depicting graphic violence and gore. A whole barrage of titles previously banned by the BBFC from getting a cinema release suddenly ended up uncensored on home video.

What began as a bill drafted by little known Luton Tory back bencher Graham Bright was made law after he and the tabloid press (most notably The Daily Mail) had successfully whipped the media into a frenzied hysteria over so-called 'video nasties'. Ban the Sadist Videos! was one of the more famous headlines they ran. When the bill was made law it became a legal requirement that all videotapes must be submitted to the BBFC for classification (and possible cuts).

The pre-cert video era is best remembered (amongst horror fans in particular) for the ensuing 'video nasty' debacle in which a selection of 72 videotapes were singled out and prosecuted by the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) under Section 2 or Section 3 of the OPA (Obscene Publications Act). Of these, 39 titles were deemed by the courts to be obscene and it's those titles which formed the final 'Video Nasties list."

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1984analogue mediab-moviebad tastebanned • Betamax • British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) • Capacitance Electronic Disc (CED)censorship • cinema release • collectiblesDaily Mail • DiscoVision • exploitation films • exploitation movies • film classification • gore • Graham Bright • graphic violencehome video • LaserDisc • legislationmisogyny • Music and Video (magazine) • nostalgia • Obscene Publications Act (OPA) • obscenityobsolete medium • Popular Video (magazine) • pre-cert video • pre-cert video era • pre-cert videos • pre-certification video • rare video releases • SelectaVisionsexploitation • shocksploitation • slasher • slasher film • sleaze • teensploitation • Television and Home Video (magazine) • UK • unregulated industry • VCR (N1500) • VCR (N1700) • VHS • Video 2000 • Video Business (magazine) • Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) • Video Cassette Recording • Video Compact Cassette (VCC) • video distribution • video nasties • video nasty • Video News (magazine) • Video Recordings Act • video releases • video rental • video rentals market • Video Retailer (magazine) • Video Review (magazine) • Video The Magazine • Video Today (magazine) • Video Trade Weekly (magazine) • Video Viewer (magazine) • Video Week (magazine) • Video World (magazine) • videocassette • videocassette recorder • VideoDisc • videotapes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2010

$#*! My Dad Says: Twitter one-liners basis of CBS television series

"Pressure? Get married when you want. Your wedding's just one more day in my life I can't wear sweat pants.'"

(Sam Halpern via Justin Halpern, 10.12.2009)

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$#*! My Dad Says • $h*! My Dad Says • 20092010 • Bleep My Dad Says • CBScitationcomedy • comedy writer • digital culture • expletive • father • Forgetting Sarah Marshall • Justin Halpern • Kristen Bell • Laughing Squid • obscenityone-liner • Patrick Schumacker • profanityquoteremediation • Rob Corddry • salty comments • Sam Halpern • San Diego • Sh*t My Dad Says • Shit My Dad Says • sitcomtelevision • The Daily Show • tweeted • TwittervulgarityWilliam Shatner

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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