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22 DECEMBER 2013

Global Technology Outlook 2013: Personalised Education

"An industry at the brink of transformation: The education industry is at the brink of an IT–enabled transformation. This transformation is driven by a demand for quality education that outstrips supply especially in the growth markets, misalignment between education and employment needs, and impatience with inefficiencies of education systems. For example, the government of Brazil is already funding students to go abroad because of a shortage of education infrastructure and quality educators. If growth continues to follow the existing trajectory, India will need about 800 more traditional universities than current levels today of about 350 universities.

Today, the most talked about application of technology to address these gaps is the advent of Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC, which are growing rapidly. Several startups have emerged including Udacity, Khan Academy and Coursera, with millions of students enrolled across hundreåds of countries. Large amounts of new data are being created, which thus far is untapped for its potential.

What is Personalized Education: Education today is mainly delivered on a one size fits all basis. This is a key cause of the poor quality and inefficiencies associated with the industry. Educational institutions can learn from healthcare by drawing the parallels of doctors to educators, patients to learners, medicine/treatment to courses/learning, and payers to education loan providers. From a technology point of view, the use of electronic health data to form patient records, derive evidence, and provide patient–centric personalized healthcare can be extended to education, with the formulation of digital student records helping to inform and provide personalized learning pathways based on the capabilities of the learner and the desired outcomes.

Implications for the industry: The education industry is ripe for innovation, as new business models are instantiated on the emerging new sources of data, in particular the longitudinal learning data (tracking student information over multiple years in multiple schools). Predictive and prescriptive analytics will be applied to improve outcomes and efficiency. Clustering learners into groups, assigning new learners to existing clusters, identifying when a learner is deviating from a particular path are some possible outcomes. Prescriptive analytics would identify personalized learning pathways, track progress, and provide feedback to ultimately improve timely graduations and employability. Combined with industry demand data, supply estimates could be provided and targeted courses created with intakes tweaked to meet estimated demand. What will it take to succeed?: Ultimately there are many stakeholders who will be involved in improving education. This includes academic institutions, state education departments, students, learning management systems (LMS) and MOOC providers, government social service agencies and corporations. In order to achieve their often–shared goals, particularly to improve graduation and employment rates, they'll need to come together to create an open platform for sharing this data and insights from the analytics."

(William LaFontaine, 2013, IBM Research)

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TAGS

2013 • Alabama State Education • analyticsBrazilCourseradata integration • demand for quality education • Desire2Learn • digital student records • e-learningeducationeducation and employment • education industry • education shortage • electronic health data • healthcareIBM • IBM Global Technology Outlook (GTO) • IBM Research • IndiaKhan Academy • learning management systems • LMSlongitudinal learning dataMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCsone-size-fits-all solution • outcomes and efficiency • patient records • patient-centric • personalised educationpersonalised healthcarepersonalised learning • personalised learning pathways • predictive analytics • prescriptive analytics • Qatar Supreme Education • study abroadUdacity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 DECEMBER 2013

Video lecture of the December TEL Event at Bournemouth University

"BU December TEL Event", Uploaded on 17 Dec 2013 by BU Business School.

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TAGS

2013Blackboard (LMS)Bournemouth UniversityBrazil • Centre for Excellence in Media Practice (CEMP) • creating and integrating small dataDesire2Learneducation technology • Gelareh Roushan • IBMIndian • internet learning • John East • learning engagementlearning technologyLMS • Media School at Bournemouth University • MOOCspeople and organisationspersonalised educationpersonalised healthcareRaspberry PiRavensbourneremote learningresearch and innovation • reverse outsourcing • small data • Small Private Online Course (SPOC) • SPOCs • Stephen Heppellstudent engagementTELvideo lecture • window on the world • Wipro Technologies Ltd

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Teach and Learn Online: Die LMS die! You too PLE!

"The PLE project recognises the fundamental flaws in Virtual Learning Environments or Learning Management Systems (VLE, LMS), but falls short in its vision of an alternative. At this stage in the project it is suggesting that the PLE be a desktop application for a student (sounds a bit like my old Perfect LMS idea) or a singular portal online.

At risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll have to repeat my defining question about Internet enhanced learning, but this time in response to the PLE.

Question to the PLE: Why do we need a PLE when we already have the Internet? The Internet is my PLE, ePortfolio, VLE what ever. Thanks to blogger, bloglines, flickr, delicious, wikispaces, ourmedia, creative commons, and what ever comes next in this new Internet age, I have a strong online ID and very extensive and personalised learning environment. Actually I think the PLE idea is better envisioned by the futurist concept known as the Evolving Personalised Information Construct (EPIC). I think we already have EPIC, so why do we need the PLE?

To extend the statement: We insignificant little teachers and our out of date schools and classrooms don't need to be investing in media projects like VLEs, LMS and even PLEs. Our dam walls of knowledge have burst! and no amount of sand bagging will stop the flood that is clearly discrediting our authority over learning. Media, and with it communications, will evolve (as it certainly has in the last 50 years or more) well beyond the limitations of our classrooms, with investments and broadcast influence we can't even fathom. Why waste our precious money and time on projects that only serve to suspend our true position within that media scape. The PLE makes me think of ELGG, and it all makes me wonder why it is we educationalists still think we are even relevant anymore. The people (yes that includes us) are learning how to read and write for themselves, and in an amazing act of collective generosity, the people are teaching each other – why do they even need our classrooms... is it perhaps only credentialism that we offer? Or is it also sense of security and safety? Is it false?"

(Leigh Blackall, 13 November 2005)

Fig.1 "Lords of Graphite" by 5star (Neil Caldwell).

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TAGS

2005authorised voiceBlogger (software) • Bloglines • broadcast societycentralised platformclassrooms • collective generosity • Creative CommonscredentialismDeliciousdesktop application • desktop classroom • e-portfolio • educationalists • ELGG • EPIC (acronym) • ePortfolio • Evolving Personalised Information Construct • Flickrgift cultureinformation literacy • internet enhanced learning • learning and teaching • learning centre • Learning Management System • learning media • learning platform • learning portal • Leigh Blackall • LMSmedia literacymediascape • network literate • new Internet age • online portal • open Internet • Ourmedia • out of date • personalised learning environment • pervasive mediaPLEschools • singular portal online • virtual learning environmentsVLEWikispaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JULY 2012

CETIS: JISC Pedagogical Vocabularies Review

"The JISC Pedagogical Vocabularies project was a short study, managed by CETIS, to scope the potential for identification, development and use of pedagogical vocabularies for the UK post–16 and HE communities. After a period of data gathering and community consultation, a Working Group of experts from various sectors and communities developed two reports along with recommendations to JISC that will be used to inform future development in this area, in collaboration with JISC partners."

(Joint Information Systems Committee, UK)

1). Pedagogical Vocabularies Review, which inventories existing pedagogical vocabularies, including flat lists, taxonomies, thesauri, ontologies and classification schemes, relevant to the UK post–16 and HE education sectors, with reference to current work in Europe. Final Draft, 23rd December 2005.

TAGS

2005 • capturing vocabularies • Centre for Educational Technology Interoperability Standards • CETIS • classification schemes • community consultation • current standards • data gathering • developing vocabularies • e-learning • existing pedagogical vocabularies • flat lists • funding policy • HE communities • investment policy • JISC • JISC partners • Joint Information Systems CommitteelearningLMS • managing vocabularies • ontologies • pedagogical vocabularies • Pedagogical Vocabularies Review • pedagogypost-16project scopestrategic planningtaxonomiesTEL • thesauri • UK • vocabularies • vocabulary capturing methodologies • vocabulary capturing technologies • vocabulary management technologies • vocabulary management technologies review • vocabulary specifications
08 JULY 2012

From LMS to VLE or from supermarkets to airports: Classifying elearning platforms using metaphors

"This paper presents a rational model developed to make sense of various elearning platforms currently in use in Australian universities. The conceptualisation and organisation of the elearning platforms is underpinned by an educational psychology framework of social construction of meaning, data visualisation and story telling for meaning making. The model explains how various elearning platforms can be integrated to represent a threedimensional, hierarchical construct that has the potential to aid understandings about the utility of information systems (IS) for learning and teaching. The model shows that LAMS, which has gained increasing popularity in Europe (Laurillard & Masterman, 2010), is usefully depicted as a 'middle ground' system, successfully bridging conventional LMSs and more advanced IS, referred here as (MU)VLEs (Multi–User Virtual Learning Environments). The model has important implications on how university lecturers, classroom teachers and students come to engage with an increasingly complex elearning environment."

(Eva Dobozy & Patricia Reynolds, LAMS Conference Sydney 2010)

Dobozy, E. & Reynolds, P. (2010). From LMS to VLE or from supermarkets to airports: Classifying elearning platforms using metaphors. Proceedings of the 5th International LAMS Conference 2010. http://lamsfoundation.org/lams2010sydney/papers.htm

TAGS

2010airport • airport metaphor • AustraliaAustralian universitiesclassification scheme • classifying • classroomcollaborationconceptual modelconceptualisationconference paper • constructivist approach • data visualisationDiana Laurillarde-learninge-learning application • e-learning conference • e-learning platformeducational psychologyelearning • elearning environments • elearning platforms • electronic portfolioengagement • Eva Dobozy • hierarchical orderinginformation systemsinformation visualisation • IS • LAMS • LAMS Conference • learninglearning and teachinglearning designlearning design support environmentlecturer • Liz Masterman • LMSmeaning makingmetaphor • Multi-User Virtual Learning Environments • MUVLE • Patricia Reynolds • pedagogysocial construction of meaningsocial constructivismsocial-constructivist approachstorytellingstudentssupermarketteachinguser requirementsvisual metaphorVLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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