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Which clippings match 'Collaborative Learning' keyword pg.1 of 2
27 JUNE 2014

Collaborative peer learning through pair programming

"Pair programming is a style of programming in which two programmers work side–by–side at one computer, continuously collaborating on the same design, algorithm, code, or test. One of the pair, called the driver, types at the computer or writes down a design. The other partner, called the navigator, has many jobs. One is to observe the work of the driver, looking for defects. The navigator also has a more objective point of view and is the strategic, long–range thinker. Together, the driver and the navigator continuously brainstorm a solution. Periodically, the programmers switch roles between the driver and the navigator."

(Laurie Williams, 2007)

Williams, L. (2007). "Lessons learned from seven years of pair programming at North Carolina State University." SIGCSE Bull. 39(4): 79–83.

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TAGS

active learning • brainstorming solutions • co-learnercollaborative learningcomputer programming education • continuously collaborating • design pedagogy • design roles • design teams • driver (peer learning) • Laurie Williams • learn to codelearning is socially enactedlearning processlearning software • learning strategies • learning support • navigator (peer learning) • North Carolina State University • pair programming • participatory learningpedagogic approachespedagogic practicespeer instructionpeer learningpeer-production • role specialisation • side-by-side • social learningsocial-constructivist approachsoftware programmingtechnology educationworking practicesworking together

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
04 OCTOBER 2013

Meredith Davis: A Call to Action for Design Educators

"I believe that design education, at the most fundamental level, views complexity as a problem to be overcome through reductivist artifacts, not as an inevitable and pervasive attribute of life in the post–industrial community. So if the future is about an ever–expanding web of connectedness, how are we preparing students for meaningful work in this complex world? I'd like to suggest that we're not. Despite the obvious emotional impact of Glaser's poster, he belongs to a generation in which the goal of design was to make things simple. Negroponte, on the other hand, is a technologist for whom the design goal is to render the complex manageable and to make complicated things meaningful.

Almost everything about today's graphic design education is matched to Glaser's worldview. We structure both curricula and projects in craft–based progressions from simple to complex, from the abstract to the contextualized. In typography classes, for example, we begin with the letter, and then advance to the word, sentence, paragraph, and page. Sequences of typography courses are built on this simple to complex progression, when opening InDesign demands that students address the formal and interpretive issues of publication design simultaneously; how do you defer a discussion of leading, of column width, of the modernist preconceptions of software, of language? The only option is default, and what kind of typographic lesson is that?

The reality is that our strategy for teaching typography is residue from how students could comp type in predigital times; by drawing. It is the organizational structure for every type book since James Craig's 1970 Designing with Type, but it holds less relevance for what students need to know about communication in a digital world. Typography today is a complex relational system that depends on the interplay of formal, technological, linguistic, and cultural variables. Yet we persist in teaching this progression of scale, isolating such variables within their own distinct conceptual frameworks and rules.

The same strategy exists for how students progress in other studies of form. Foundation lessons begin with abstraction: point, line, and plane; color wheels; and paper–folding exercises. We defer discussions of meaning and context until later levels of the curriculum and beginning students learn these abstraction principles only through patterns in what makes their teachers smile. Nothing about these studies resembles what students know about in the real world, and as a colleague recently suggested, what the clients of design see in our work. So what if we begin with the familiar and complex?"

(Meredith Davis, 4 April 2008, AIGA Boston Presentation)

Presentation made at W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century, Emily Carr University of Art+Design, Vancouver, Canada, 7–9 December 2011.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 SEPTEMBER 2013

Ladies Learning Code: promoting a diverse workforce

"Ladies Learning Code is a Toronto–based not–for–profit organization that runs workshops for women (and men) who want to learn beginner–friendly computer programming and other technical skills in a social and collaborative way. Today we have chapters across Canada, a thriving girls' program called Girls Learning Code and a permanent workshop space in Toronto. Oh, and we're just getting started."

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TAGS

beginner-friendlyCanadacode clubcollaborative learningcomputer programmerscomputer programmingcomputer programming education • diverse teams • diverse workforce • gendered technology • Girls Learning Code (workshop) • girls programme • Heather Payne • Ladies Learning Code (workshop) • learn to codelearning softwarenot for profitsocial learningsoftware developerssoftware developmentsoftware literacySTEM subjects • technical skills • technology educationTorontowomenwomen and technologywomen in technologyworkshop for womenworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 AUGUST 2013

Action Learning, Action Research Association: Australasian Conference 2013

"The ALARA 2013 Australasian Conference will be held at Riverglenn, Brisbane, Australia on 23–24 September 2013. The conference will provide an opportunity for professional and personal development and renewal of practitioners in business, government, education and community sectors. Around the theme 'Creating a Better World', the conference will investigate how individuals, organisations and communities contribute to handing on a better world. We have presenters coming from the United Kingdom, United States of America, Malaysia, Singapore, Vanuatu and most states of Australia."

TAGS

2013action learningAction Learning Action Research Associationaction researchALARA • ALARA 2013 Australasian Conference • Arizio Sweeting • Australasian conference • AustraliaBrisbanecollaborative learningconference • creating a better world • Emmanuel Tetteh • Michael Dent • strategic network • sustainable societytransformationtransformational engagement • transformational practices • transforming businesses • transforming colleges • transforming communities • transforming governments • transforming schools • transforming universities • transforming voluntary organisations • transforming workplaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2012

Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

"CSCL is focused on how collaborative learning supported by technology can enhance peer interaction and work in groups, and how collaboration and technology facilitate sharing and distributing of knowledge and expertise among community members."

(Lasse Lipponen, 2002)

2). Lipponen, L. (2002). "Exploring foundations for computer–supported collaborative learning". Proceedings of the Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning: Foundations for a CSCL Community. Boulder, Colorado, International Society of the Learning Sciences: 72–81.

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19962002ACM • CAI • Carmen Egido • collaboration and learningcollaborative learning • collaborative nature • Computer Assisted Instruction • computer assisted learningComputer Supported Collaborative LearningComputer Supported Cooperative Work • CSC • CSCLCSCWeducational technology • emerging paradigm • group workgroupware • human cognition and learning • Intelligent Tutoring Systems • ITS • Jay David Bolter • Jolene Galegher • knowledge distribution • knowledge sharing • Lasse Lipponen • learning and teachinglearning technology • Logo-as-Latin • parallelismpedagogy • peer interaction • Robert Kraut • Roy Pea • Saul Greenberg • sharing and distributing knowledgetechnology and collaborationtechnology facilitated sharing • Timothy Koschmann • University of Helsinki • working in groups

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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