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Which clippings match 'Qualitative Data' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 AUGUST 2013

An improved method of studying the user/search process in user-system interactions

"A major 'user/search process' limitation identified by Kinsella and Bryant (1987) is the inability to isolate and characterise individual users of on–line systems in order to describe the pattern of their use. Users' perceptions of their searches are not recorded, transaction logs cannot measure the information needs that users' are unable to express in their search statements (input), and they cannot reflect users' satisfaction with search results (output). As Kurth states, '[the fact] that transaction logs are unable to address such cognitive aspects of on–line searching behaviour is a true limit of the methodology' (Kurth, 1993: 100). Supplementary research, such as questionnaires, protocol analysis and interviews, must be undertaken in order to build a fuller picture of searching behaviour, success and satisfaction."

(Griffiths, J. R., R. J. Hartley, et al., 2002)

Jillian R. Griffiths, R.J. Hartley and Jonathan P. Willson. (2002). "An improved method of studying user–system interaction by combining transaction log analysis and protocol analysis." Information Research 7(4).

TAGS

2002 • characterising users • cognitive actionsdata collectiondata gathering instruments • electronic information resources • end user studiesend-users • information needs • Information Research (journal) • information system evaluation • information-seeking • information-seeking behaviourinterview (research method) • Janet Kinsella • Jillian Griffiths • Jonathan Willson • limitations of quantitative methodologies • Martin Kurth • online systems • open access journalpatterns of usepeer-reviewed journal • Philip Bryant • protocol analysisqualitative dataquestionnaire • Richard Hartley • search and retrieval • search behaviour • search logging • search process • search results • search results satisfaction • search statements • searchersearching and browsing • searching behaviour • searching for information • success and satisfaction • supplementary research • system requirements • talk-aloud comments • think aloud (research method)transaction log analysis • transaction logging • transaction logging datatransaction logsusability testing • user search process • user-based evaluation • user-system interaction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2013

The Qualitative Research Interview

"While all interviews are used to get to know the interviewee better, the purpose of that knowing varies according to the research question and the disciplinary perspective of the researcher. Thus, some research is designed to test a priori hypotheses, often using a very structured interviewing format in which the stimulus (questions) and analyses are standardised, while other research seeks to explore meaning and perceptions to gain a better understanding and/or generate hypotheses. This latter research generally requires some form of qualitative interviewing which encourages the interviewee to share rich descriptions of phenomena while leaving the interpretation or analysis to the investigators. The purpose of the qualitative research interview is to contribute to a body of knowledge that is conceptual and theoretical and is based on the meanings that life experiences hold for the interviewees. In this article we review different qualitative interview formats with a focus on the face–to–face, in–depth qualitative research interview and conclude with a discussion of related technical and ethical issues."

(Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree, 2006)

Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree (2006). "The Qualitative Research Interview", Medical Education, Volume 40, Issue 4, pages 314–321, Wiley Online Library

TAGS

a priori hypotheses • Barbara DiCicco-Bloom • Benjamin Crabtree • body of knowledge • disciplinary perspective • ethical issues • explore meaning • explore perceptions • face-to-faceface-to-face interview • generate hypotheses • in-depth interview • interpretationinterview (research method)interviewinginterviews • investigators • life experiences • qualitative data • qualitative interview formats • qualitative interviewing • qualitative interviewsqualitative research • qualitative research interview • researchresearch interviewsresearch questionrich descriptions • standardised data • structured interviewing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2012

Qualitative Research Methods: interview questions

"Basic descriptive questions
Can you talk to me about your car accident? Tell me what happened on that evening?
Describe how you felt that evening?

Follow–up questions
You mentioned that 'planning time' is important to you. Can you tell me how you use planning time?

Experience/example questions
You mentioned that you loved going to London. Can you give me an example or two of what made you love London?
Talk about your impressions of London.

Simple clarification questions
You have used the term 'constructivist teacher' today. Can you clarify that for me? What exactly can you talk about regarding your constructivist teaching?

Structural/paradigmatic questions
You state that this class was a problematic one. What would you describe as the cause of these problems?
Of all the things you have told me about being a critical care nurse, what is the underlying premise of your work day? In other words, what keeps you going everyday?

Comparison/contrast questions
You said there was a big difference between a great principal and an ordinary principal. What are some of these differences? Can you describe a few for me?"

(Hora Tjitra, Slide 12)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2010

Trust Network Sclerosis: The Hazard of Trust in Innovation Investment Communities

"This article considers the role of trust in structuring and sustaining entrepreneurial networks in Anglo–American communities. Interviews with stakeholders involved in innovation investment demonstrate how shared identity and experience serve as proxies for trust in influencing decisions, and subsequently how trust can serve as a proxy for thorough due diligence. Where relationship plays a role vital to the venture capital investment process, close dialogue reveals the ways nascent business development is affected by excessive reliance on trustworthiness, thereby introducing a form of lock–in labeled 'trust network sclerosis.' Qualitative data informs this analysis of how opinion–leaders shape high–risk, information–asymmetric investment decisions with ultimate community accumulation and effect. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for entrepreneurial communities, other high–trust networks, and economic geography broadly."

(Terry Babcock–Lumish)

Babcock–Lumish, T. L., 'Trust Network Sclerosis: The Hazard of Trust in Innovation Investment Communities' (March 13, 2009). Journal of Financial Transformation, Vol. 29, pp.163–172 . Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1358926

TAGS

2009business developmentdecision makingeconomic geography • entrepreneurial communities • entrepreneurial networks • entrepreneurship • high-trust networks • influencing decisions • innovation • innovation investment communities • investmentnetworks • opinion-leaders • organisationsqualitative datashared experience • shared identity • SSRNTerry Babcock-Lumishtrust • trust network sclerosis • trust networks • trustworthinessventure capital • venture capital investment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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