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Which clippings match 'Fascism' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 NOVEMBER 2016

Alex Gendler: how to recognize a dystopia

"The genre of dystopia – the 'not good place'– has captured the imaginations of artists and audiences alike for centuries. But why do we bother with all this pessimism? Alex Gendler explains how dystopias act as cautionary tales – not about some particular government or technology, but the very idea that humanity can be molded into an ideal shape."

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TAGS

Aldous Huxley • Alex Gendler • Animal Farm (1954)artificial intelligence • aryan • atomic energyBlade Runner (1982)brave new world • Brave New World (1932) • cautionary talecommunist systemconcentration campdemocracydepletion of natural resourcesDr Strangelove (1964) • drudgery • dystopia • dystopian fiction • dystopian literature • dystopian science fictioneugenicsfactory workerfascismfree willgas chambergenetic engineering • Gullivers Travels (1726) • H G Wells • humanitys future • impoverished masses • impoverishment • industrial ageindustrial revolution • industrial warfare • It Cant Happen Here (1935) • Jack London • Jonathan Swift • mass entertainment • mass media ageMetropolis (1927) • modern anxieties • nightmare world • Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)nuclear war • oligarchy • oppressionoverpopulationparadise • perfect world • political structures • povertyprogress narratives • resource depletion • science fiction • Sinclair Lewis • slumsocial rolessocial structures • space colony • space travelspeculative fiction • squalor • surveillance state • TED-Ed • The Handmaids Tale (1985) • The Iron Heel (1908) • The RepublicThe Time MachineThomas Moretotalitarianism • tyrannical oligarchy • tyranny of modernismutopia • V for Vendetta (2006) • Watchmen (2009) • We (1924) • Westworld (1973) • WW1WWII • Yevgeny Zamyatin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2013

Call to Order: the pretentious sterility of culture

"In a masterstroke of design, the curator of Chaos and Classicism, Kenneth Silver, chose a work of art to illustrate the Nazi annexation of neoclassicism that at first glance is anything but threatening. The Four Elements by Adolf Ziegler decorated the walls of Hitler's Munich apartment. A member of the Nazi Party, Ziegler was charged by Hitler in 1937 to stage–manage the purge of modern art in the notorious Exhibition of Degenerate Art. Ziegler's depiction of four nude women who symbolize fire, earth, air and water, the four elements of nature recognized in antiquity, personifies little but the pretentious sterility of culture under the Third Reich. Yet, it is the perfect embodiment of the banality of evil."

(Ed Voves, 4 October 2010)

Fig.1 Adolf Ziegler, The Four Elements: Fire, Water and Earth, Air, (Die vier Elemente. Feuer, Wasser und Erde, Luft), before 1937, Oil on canvas, three panels, left to right: 170.3 x 85.2 cm, 171 x 190.8 cm, and 161.3 x 76.7 cm, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Sammlung Moderner Kunst in der Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich.

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TAGS

1937Adolf Hitler • Adolf Ziegler • air • antiquitybanalitycall to orderchaos and classicismclassical beautyclassical formcorrectioncultural productionEarth • elements • emasculation • essential elements of artessentialismExhibition of Degenerate Artfascismfire • Kenneth Silver • masterstroke of design • modern artmodernismMunichnatureNazi • Nazi Party • neoclassical revivalneoclassicismnude women • pretentious sterility of culture • purificationpurity • racial purity • return to ordersterility • The Four Elements • Third Reichwaterwork of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2003

Fasci: A Bundle Of Sticks Symbolising Unity

"The bundle of sticks, a fasces, on the back of the [American] Winged Liberty (Mercury) dime was used as a symbol of authority by officials in ancient Rome. The sticks represented the power of individuals. Individually they broke easily. But by binding them together and inserting an ax, they could not be broken easily. That way they represented the united power of many working together as one.

The bundle of lictor's rods (fasces) was appropriated by Mussolini to symbolise Fascism in 1919.Fasces appeared on the back of American dimes minted between 1916 and 1945. These dimes are referred to as the 'Mercury' or 'Liberty' dimes."
(Mike Metras)

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TAGS

binding • bundle of sticks • dime • fasces • fasci • fascism • individually • liberty • lictor • Mercury • Mussolini • Rome • united power
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