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Which clippings match 'World Wide Web' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 NOVEMBER 2014

Remediation: current media remediates older and newer media

"It would seem, then, that all mediation is remediation. We are not claiming this as an a priori truth, but rather arguing that at this extended historical moment, all current media function as remediators and that remediation offer us a means of interpreting the work of earlier media as well. Our culture conceives of each medium or constellation of media as it responds to, redeploys, competes with, and reforms other media. In the first instance, we may think of something like a historical progression, of newer media remediating older ones and in particular of digital media remediating their predecessors. But ours is a genealogy of affiliations, not a linear history, and in this genealogy, older media can also remediate newer ones.[3] Television can and does refashion itself to resemble the World Wide Web [p.189], and film can and does incorporate and attempt to contain computer graphics within its own linear form. [p.153] No medium, it seems, can now function independently and establish its own separate and purified space of cultural meaning."

(David Bolter and Richard Grusin, 55.p, 2000)

David Bolter and Richard Grusin (2000). Mediation and Remediation. "Remediation: Understanding New Media", The MIT Press.

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2000computer graphics • cultural meaning • current media • David Bolterdigital mediafilm • genealogy of affiliations • historical progression • incorporation • linear form • media • media constellation • media formsmediationmedium • newer media • not a linear history • older media • refashion • remediating older media forms • remediation • remediators • Richard Grusintelevisionworld wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Feb. 8, 1996: We (Mostly) Celebrate 24 Hours in Cyberspace

"24 Hours in Cyberspace was the inspiration of photographer Rick Smolan, who created the 'Day in the Life' photo-essay series. Smolan used the same formula as 'Day in the Life,' recruiting 150 photojournalists to go out and chronicle a slice of everyday life, in this case as it pertained to the then-counterculturish phenomenon of the web.

The technology of the internet was not the subject: Smolan wanted (and got) pictures of how different people in different cultures were using the internet, and the effect that the medium of cyberspace was having on their lives.

The resulting work was edited and then displayed on a website. It also appeared as the cover story of that week's edition of U.S. News and World Report and, soon thereafter, as a coffee-table book."

(Wired.com, 8 February 2008)

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1996 • 24 hours • 24 Hours in Cyberspace (1996) • 8 February 1996 • a single day • book • coffee-table book • cyberspacedaily lifeday in the life • digital time capsule • glimpse • influence of the web • innocence • lives touched by the web • photographer • photographers around the world • random collection • Rick Smolan • single day on the internet • time capsule • visually capture • webWired (magazine)world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2014

Horizon: The defenders of anonymity on the internet

"Yet while anonymity offers a potential bulwark against surveillance, for those who do not wish to be watched, it has also helped in the development of that part of the online world known as the dark web.

Sites on the dark web like Silk Road have used Tor technology to hide their location and yet still be available to users who wish to visit them.

The dark web has now become a focus for law enforcement officers who believe it is facilitating a variety of illegal activities including financial crime and child abuse."

(Mike Radford, 3 September 2014, BBC News)

Fig.1 "Inside the Dark Web" 2014, television programme, BBC Two – Horizon, Series 51, Episode 4, first broadcast: 3 September 2014.

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2014 • anonymising networks • anonymity • anonymous communication • anonymous protocol • anonymous system • anonymous web browsing • BBC Twobitcoin • black market • Chelsea Manning • child abusecommunications monitoring • controversial technology • crime evasion • criminal actscryptographycybercrime • dark internet • dark web • data securityDavid Chaum • deep web • deepnet • detection • digital realm • dissidents • distributed filesharing network • distributed network • Edward Snowden • encryption • file sharing • financial crime • free market economy • GCHQ • government agencies • hidden network • hidden web • Horizon (BBC TV series) • I2P • information flowsinformation retrieval • information use • Internet • Interpol • invisible web • Jacob Appelbaum • Joss Wright • Julian Assangelaw enforcement • Mix Network • monitoring • National Security Agency • NSAonline activities • online marketplace • online space • Oxford Internet Institute • privacy and security • search engines • Silk Road (marketplace) • surface web • surveillancetelecommunicationsTim Berners-LeeTortraffic analysis • Troels Oerting • US Naval Research Laboratory Tor • Wikileaksworld wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 FEBRUARY 2013

Constant Association for Art and Media: an interdisciplinary arts-lab

"Constant works in–between media and art and is interested in the culture and ethics of the World Wide Web. The artistic practice of Constant is inspired by the way that technological infrastructures, data–exchange and software determine our daily life. Free software, copyright alternatives and (cyber)feminism are important threads running through the activities of Constant.

Constant organizes workshops, print–parties, walks and 'Verbindingen/Jonctions'–meetings on a regular basis for a public that's into experiments, discussions and all kinds of exchanges."

(Constant)

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1997artistic practice • arts-lab • Brussels • Constant (arts lab) • CRID • culture and ethics • cyberfeminismdaily life • data-exchange • experimental artistic practices • Francois Deville • Free Art License • Hasselt • interdisciplinary • interdisciplinary creative practices • Internet art • jonctions • Liesbeth Huybrechts • media and art • media artnet art • non-profit association • print-parties • RenovaS • Severine Dusollier • SPIP • technological infrastructure • University of Namur • verbindingen • world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2012

V2_Institute for the Unstable Media

"In the turbulent year of 1981 the building at Vughterstraat 234 in Den Bosch was squatted by a group of artists and musicians, including a young Joke Brouwer and an almost as young Alex Adriaansens. There was no place for their sounds, art or ideas in the established venues, so they created one of their own at 'V234,' quickly shortened to 'V2.' September 3 and 4, 1981 the first events where organized. In 1982, these pragmatic anarchists decided to organize themselves into a foundation, and V2_ was officially born."

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1981 • 3D projection • Alex Adriaansens • art in electronic networks • art installationart productionartist collectiveartistic means • arts practice • audiovisual arts • centre for art and media technology • communications media • computers as an artistic medium • cyberspace • Den Bosch • digital imagery • digital techniques • do-it-yourself • Dutch Electronic Art Festival • Einsturzende Neubauten • electronic mediaelectronic musicexhibition space • Institute for the Unstable Media • interactive installationsinteractive video • interdisciplinary workspace • international media laboratory • ISDN • Joke Brouwer • knowledge exchange • Laibach • machine art • manifesto • mixed media applications • multimedia centre • multimedia organisationNetherlands • network and communications media • new technical possibilitiesnew technology • pragmatic anarchists • public events • public spaceroboticsRotterdamSonic Youthsound installation • squatting • The building gave room for concerts and performances analogue media • unstable media • V2_virtual realityvisual arts • Vughterstraat 234 • world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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