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Which clippings match 'Design For The Screen' keyword pg.1 of 6
11 MARCH 2019

The Wellcome Collection's Interactive Digital Stories

"Digital Stories was developed by Wellcome Collection in 2014 to make the outputs of our ambitious digitisation programme both accessible and meaningful to an audience beyond academic researchers. Each story is arranged in six chapters, following a narrative arc or thematic thread: each chapter takes the form of a long scrolling page containing frames of text, interactives, graphics, and video. Image Galleries and further interactives are accessed by hotspots on the pages. Each image is accompanied by a link to the original source and an option to download."

(Danny Birchall, Anna Faherty, 2016, MW2016: Museums and the Web 2016)

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2014 • Air Loom • all-controlling Air Loom • Anna Faherty • antisemitic stereotype • Anton Mesmer • Ark of curiosities • back and forth in time • cabinet of curiosities • causes of death • chapter metaphor • classificationcollection • Danny Birchall • design for the screen • Digital Stories (2014) • digital story • digital storytellingdigitisation programme • fan mail • fantasy • hypnotism • i-Doc • infinite canvas • interactive digital mediainteractive digital narratives • interactive infographic • interactive information graphicsinteractive information visualisationinteractive multimediainteractive narrativeinteractive storyinteractives • James Tilly Matthews • John Tradescant • Lambeth • Mike Jay • mind control • Mindcraft (digital story) • multimedia interactive • Museums and the Web (conference) • MW2016 • obituary data • online multimediarepositoryscrolling experience • seventeenth century • Sigmund Freud • Sir Henry Wellcome • six individuals • Svengali • The Collectors (digital story) • thematic thread • thirst for knowledge • UKvertical scroll • Wellcome Collection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2015

i-Docs: website of this emerging interactive documentary form

"You will find a number of definitions and points-of-view on what constitutes an interactive documentary. At this point in the development of this fast-moving field we feel that it is important to have an expansive definition that can embrace the many different kinds of work that are emerging. The i-Docs site includes coverage of projects that you may find elsewhere described as web-docs, transmedia documentaries, serious games, cross-platform docs, locative docs, docu-games, pervasive media. For us any project that starts with an intention to document the 'real' and that does so by using digital interactive technology can be considered an i-doc. What unites all these projects is this intersection between digital interactive technology and documentary practice. Where these two things come together, the audience become active agents within documentary – making the work unfold through their interaction and often contributing content. If documentary is about telling stories about our shared world; we are interested in what happens as the audience get more closely involved in this way. At the heart of i-Docs is the question; what opportunities emerge as documentary becomes something that is co-created?"

(Digital Cultures Research Centre at University of the West of England)

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2011 • active agents • active audienceBristolco-creator-ship • cross-platform docs • design for the screen • Digital Cultures Research Centre • digital storytelling • docu-games • docufiction • document the real • documentary formdocumentary practicedocumentary truthhybrid formshypermediai-Doc • i-Docs project • interactive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive multimediainteractive storytelling • Jon Dovey • Judith Aston • locative docs • online multimedia • our shared world • pervasive media • Sandra Gaudenzi • serious gamestheir stories • transmedia documentaries • University of the West of England • UWE Bristol • web-based documentary • web-docs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2015

Illuminating North Korea by photojournalist David Guttenfelder

Fig.1 "Illuminating North Korea", photographs and video by David Guttenfelder, 10 June 2015, The New York Times.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2014

BBC Footballers United WWI interactive drama

"I undertook the interaction design of the project on behalf of 100 Shapes. I worked with the visual designer to develop and refine the concept over several months, informed by feedback from the clients, producer and developers. In designing this piece we overcame unique creative challenges, including revealing the wealth of supporting content and archive material within the context of the linear drama to allow viewers to follow a a different journey to explore the deeper human narrative."

(Suzie Blackman, November 2014)

[A discussion about he design process of creating BBC History's interactive drama entitled Footballers United (2014), which was produced by Somethin' Else and 100 Shapes (who produced the website and interactive features). ]

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100 Shapes (agency) • 2014audience interactionBBC History • BBC World War One centenary season • creative challenges • creative lead • cue sheet • design for the screendesign processdigital agency • digital products • football teamFootballers United (2014) • graphing technique • interaction designinteraction designerinteractive dramainteractive featuresinteractive mediainteractive timeline • page schematic • page-plan • Prix Italia • screen blueprint • Somethin Else (agency) • Suzie Blackman • user experience design (UX) • user experience designer • UX designer • website wireframe • went to war • wireframe • wireframing • women designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2013

CSS Fonts Module Level 3: the @font-face rule

"The @font–face rule allows for linking to fonts that are automatically fetched and activated when needed. This allows authors to select a font that closely matches the design goals for a given page rather than limiting the font choice to a set of fonts available on a given platform. A set of font descriptors define the location of a font resource, either locally or externally, along with the style characteristics of an individual face. Multiple @font–face rules can be used to construct font families with a variety of faces. Using CSS font matching rules, a user agent can selectively download only those faces that are needed for a given piece of text."

(World Wide Web Consortium, 3 October 2013)

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2013CSS3 • Cufon • design for the screen • design goal • End User Licensing Agreement • EOT • EULA • font • font choice • font descriptor • font embedding • font family • font linking • font matching • font resource • font-face • font-face rule • fonts • inline SVG • Open Font License (OFL) • openfonts • Opentype • OTF • platform independent • selectively download • sIFR • style characteristics • SVG • TTF • typetypefaceTypekittypography • Typoteque • ubiquitous web fonts • user agent • W3Cweb design • web design typography • web technologies • web type • web typography • webfont • WOFF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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