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Which clippings match 'Directional Information' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 OCTOBER 2015

Taking re-focusable photos with the Lytro Illum camera

"LYTRO ILLUM is the first high-end camera to harness the entire light field – to retain the richness and depth of a scene. Explore focus, perspective, and depth of field within a single image and render full-color, 3-D living pictures. Use the Lytro Desktop application to adjust a wide range of photographic parameters, including the scene's depth of field, and transform those pictures into immersive cinematic animations."

(Lytro, Inc.)

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TAGS

angular variation • camera • depth information • depth of fielddepth of focusdepth-sensing cameradigital cameradirectional information • focal distance • focus spread • image capture • image focus • image sensor • interactive photography • interactive re-focusable pictures • light field • light field camera • light field technology • light rays • light-field photography • live view • living pictures • Lytro Illum • megaray • megaray sensor • mise-en-scenenarrative photographyperspective viewphotography • plenoptic camera • plenoptic image • plenoptic photography • point of focus • post-processing • post-shot refocusing • re-editable • re-focusable • refocus • refocused • refocusing • relative focus • Ren Ng • stereophotography • two-dimensional representation • visual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual

"In the 1960s, the New York subways were a mess, sign–wise. Station names and metro lines were spelled out in a hodgepodge of sizes, shapes, and styles. The original mosaic tiles had been joined by cut stone and terracotta–all of which clashed with newer enamel signs. They were not only inconsistent in terms of style but also in where they were placed, so straphangers didn't know where to look for directions on how to get from point A to point B.

In 1970, following the merger of the IND and BMT lines, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda, designers at the firm Unimark, to put an end to the typographic chaos. The system they devised still informs signs made today and is painstakingly outlined in a 174–page manual"

(Belinda Lanks, 15 September 2014, Businessweek)

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TAGS

1960s1970Bob Noorda • Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit • Christopher Bonanos • clashing design • communication designdestination identificationdirectional information • directions • fastidious detail • graphic communicationgraphic designer • Hamish Smyth • Helvetica • hodgepodge • inconsistencies • Independent Subway System (IND) • information design • instruction manual • International Typographic Style • Jesse Reed • Kickstarter • letter combination • manualMassimo Vignelli • merger • metro line • metro station • Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA • Michael Bierutmodern design • modernist graphics • New York City • New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual • New York subway • Niko Skourtis • official font • organisation and communicationPentagram Designrationalisation • reissue • sans-serif typefacesignagesignage designsigns • spacing • spatial orientation • standards manual • straphanger • style guidesubwaysymbol system • system signage • train station • typographic chaos • typography • Unimark • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2012

Adrift in a shopping maze: it's a successful no-exit strategy

"Alan Penn, director of the Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment at University College London, has come to a conclusion that Ikea stores are 'designed just like a maze'. In doing so he's given scholarly validation to a feeling that will have occurred to many shoppers as they blunder around the blue and yellow hangar looking for a new TV unit only to emerge with two candles, a wok and a bottle of lingonberry cordial.

Penn went on to suggest that it was Ikea's strategy to keep customers inside the store for the maximum time possible. They achieve this by setting a route round the store from which it's difficult to deviate. Taking the shortcuts (which are only there to conform with fire regulations) often leaves you adrift in a sea of lampshades.

The effect is to boost impulse purchases. See a coathanger, and you might buy 'because the layout is so confusing you know you won't be able to go back and get it later'."

(Ian Tucker, 30 January 2011, The Observer, Guardian News and Media Limited)

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TAGS

a sea of lampshades • adrift • Alan Penn • circulation • coathanger • cognitive map • confusing • customersdesigndirectional informationexperience design • floor plan • IKEA • Ikea stores • impulse buy • impulse purchase • layout • maze • mental imagenavigationno escape • no-exit • organising spacesprogrammatic spaceroutesensemakingsequence of spacesshopping experiencespatial designspatial literacyspatial narrative • spatial sequence • store • store designtrappedUniversity College London • Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment • wayfindingyou are here

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2011

Britains road traffic signs developed as unified national system

"Jock Kinneir and his assistant, Margaret Calvert, were the first professional designers of a national system of road traffic signs. Elsewhere it is still usual for this to be done by engineers and surveyors–and it shows. Kinneir's work, starting with the motorway system from 1957, was new. Existing signs did not meet standards of salience, conspicuity and discriminability, to support drivers' planning and execution of often safety–critical decisions–at speed, sometimes under adverse conditions."

(Paul Stiff, Winter 2010, Eye magazine)

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TAGS

1960s • Akzidenz Grotesk (typeface) • British Rail • British road signage • communication designcommunication designersdesign systemsdestination identificationdirectional informationgraphic information design • Heathrow Airport • Herbert Spencer • information design • instructional systems design • Jock Kinneir • Margaret Calvert • Ministry of Transport • motorway • motorway network • pictogram systempictorial systems • Rail Alphabet (typeface) • Richard Kinneir • road signage • road signssans-serif typeface • sign systems • signagesignage designstandardisationstreet signsymbol system • Transport (typeface) • typefacetypographer • Typographica (typography) • unified design vocabulary • unified visual language • United Kingdomvisual communicationvisual informationvisual language • visual sign systems • visual system

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 SEPTEMBER 2010

Wayfinding: the organization and communication of our dynamic relationship to space and the environment

"Wayfinding is the organization and communication of our dynamic relationship to space and the environment. Successful design to promote wayfinding allows people to: (1) determine their location within a setting, (2) determine their destination, and (3) develop a plan that will take them from their location to their destination. The design of wayfinding systems should include: (1) identifying and marking spaces, (2) grouping spaces, and (3) linking and organizing spaces through both architectural and graphic means."

(Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access, School of Architecture and Planning, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York)

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architectural communication • boundarycirculationcognitive mapconceptual mapconceptual model • cues • design • destination • destination identificationdirectional information • districts • edgesenvironmentgraphic communicationgraphic deviceslegibilitylinkinglocalitylocationmarkersmental imagenavigationnavigational methodsnodeorganisation and communicationorganising spacesorientationpathperceptionrepetitionrhythmsignagespace • tactile marking systems • wayfindingwayfinding systemsyou are herezone

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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