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Which clippings match 'Impression Management' keyword pg.1 of 2
03 JULY 2014

Teenage subculture identities discussed in 1979 on UK youth TV programme Something Else

"In this edition from Birmingham, the Coventry band the Specials had just finished playing and George is sitting beside Martin Degville, just in front of Jane Kahn, partner in the seminal outrage shop Kahn & Bell."

(David Johnson, 28 June 2010)

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1970s197970s televisionaggression • BBC Community Programmes • BBC TVBBC2Birmingham • Boy George • British televisionclothescounterculturecultural codescultural normscultural signalsdisaffected youthdressing upfashionfashionable fad • fighting • George ODowd • identity performanceimpression managementinnocence • Jane Kahn • Kahn and Bell • magazine programme • make-up • Martin Degville • naivety • new romantics • prejudicepunk rock • punks • rebellionsocial norms • Something Else (TV series) • street fashionsubcultureteddy boyteenage rebellionteenager • The Specials • urban clothingyouth culture • youth culture magazine programme • youth subculture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 FEBRUARY 2014

Identity performance: YouTubers, real-life dolls and cosplayers

Fig.1 "My Strange Addiction: I'm a Living Doll", TLC, Season 5 (2014), original air date 1 January 2014.

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2014Barbie dollbelongingbody modificationcelebrity • china doll • china figurine • commodity fetishismcompulsive behaviourconstructed identitiesconsumer aestheticscosplay • cosplayer • digital narcissismdolldoll fetishism • doll-like features • dollificationdress-up • Emily Smith • escapismexhibitionismfadfamefantasy characterfashionable fadfetishismidentity performanceimpression management • Justin Jedlica • living dolllolitamediated representationmimicry • My Strange Addiction (TV Series) • online behaviouronline followersperformativitypersonapersonal identityplastic surgeryreal-life dollrole playingsensationalismspectacular societysuperficial appearance • TLC (TV network) • Venus Isabelle Palermo • Victoriana • video bloggervisual depictionYouTubers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2012

21 year old Valeria Lukyanova wants to be a real-life Barbie doll

"Most little girls grow up playing with Barbie dolls. Some even want to look like them. One 21–year–old has become one, or so she says.

Valeria Lukyanova has become an internet sensation in her home country of Russia, claiming on her blog to be the most famed woman on the Russian–language internet.

Her doll–like features, long blonde hair and 'perfect' body make her look like a real life Barbie."

(Laura Cox, PUBLISHED: 18:14, 22 April 2012 | UPDATED: 01:40, 25 April 2012, Dailymail.co.uk)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Aleks Krotoski's The Digital Human

"Aleks Krotoski asks not just what technology can do for us but also what is it doing to us and the world we're creating? Each week she takes us on a journey to where people are living their digital lives to explore how technology touches everything we do both on and offline.

Taking broad themes of modern living as a starting point she charts the experiences of homo digitas; both the remarkable and the mundane, to understand how we are changing just as quickly as the advances in our technology.

What does the deluge of images from digital photography mean for our memory when every second is being recorded, edited and posted online for posterity? Are the identities we create in social media no more than exercises in personal branding, to be managed and protected like any other product? And as traditional churches struggle to leverage technology to spread their faith do the behaviours we all display online have more in common with religion than rationality?

The time for wonder at the digital world is over, we live with it in every day. The question really is who are we now because of it?"

(BBC Radio 4)

Fig.1 "Mack on a summer morning", 30 March 2011 [http://www.mydogearedpages.com/2011/03/photographic–memories.html].

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2012advances in technology • Aleks Krotoski • BBC Radio 4 • being edited • constructed identitiescultural identitycyberpsychology • deluge of images • digital photography • digital world is over • display online • every second is being recorded • everydayfaith • homo digitas • human behaviouridentityidentity performanceimpression management • leverage technology • living digital livesmediated environmentsmemorymodern livingnew technologyonline and offlineour digital livespersonal branding • posted online • posterityrationalityreligionself-monitoringself-reflexivitysocial changesocial mediasocial media identitiestechnology touches everythingvirtual presence

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2011

Green USP? Greenwashing and design in the age of ethical consumption

"In the contemporary era of heightened green awareness and 'ethical consumption', major companies have quickly realised that consumers are looking for greener brands, writes Lynne Ciochetto. Design has played a key role in reinventing company profiles with new environmental messages, and designers should question these claims.

As companies have started using green concepts or claims in their advertising, branding and marketing a trend has emerged called 'greenwashing'. 'Greenwashing' refers to marketing is that is misleading, untruthful or creates false impressions (see Fred Pearce's column in the Guardian)."

(Lynne Ciochetto, 24 March 2010)

Fig.1 2010 Toyota Prius "Harmony" TV Commercial

Fig.2 Nick Turner, "BP Exec", from Art Not Oil satirising BP's revamped green corporate identity.

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advertising • Art Not Oil • BP • BP Exec • brandingcommodity • company profiles • consumptioncorporate identity • design in the age of ethical consumption • design journaldesign responsibilityemotive manipulation • environmental messages • ethical consumptionethicsEye (magazine) • Fred Pearce • graphic design • green awareness • green claims • green concepts • green corporate identity • greener brands • greenwashing • impression managementLynne CiochettomarketingmisleadingtrendsUSP

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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