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15 JUNE 2015

Sexting becoming the norm for teens: advice for parents

"A new campaign which aims to give parents the tools to deal with their children sexting is being launched by the National Crime Agency's CEOP Command. The campaign tackles the issues which arise from young people sending self-generated nude or nearly nude images and videos – commonly known as sexting."

(UK National Crime Agency, 15 June 2015)

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20152D animationad campaignadolescents • blackmail • body awarenessbody politics • Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) • child protection • cyber crime • digital youthdisplay of sexualitygraphic sex actsidentity performancein real life (IRL) • information for parents • internet saftey • National Crime Agency (NCA) • National Cyber Crime Unit (NCCU) • nearly nude images • normalising over-sharing • online protection • oversharing • photo sharing • posting images • posting onlinepractical advicepsychosocial maturationpublic service announcement • revealing images • risquesafety educationself-esteemselfiesextingsexual depictionssexualised depictionssocial consequencesspectacular society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Peggy Orenstein on our gender performance culture

"Peggy Orenstein ('Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie–Girl Culture') and Kaveri Subrahmanyam ('Digital Youth: The Role of Media in Development') had a conversation about girl culture and digital media for Googlers in Santa Monica on February 9, 2011. They were joined by Adriana Manago, who works with Kaveri at the Children's Digital Media Center (UCLA/CSULA)."
(About @Google Talks, 9 February 2011)

Fig.1 Kaveri Subrahmanyam talks to Peggy Orenstein about "Cinderella Ate My Daughter", About @Google Talks [18:24]

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Adriana Manago • Barbie Fashion Designer • boredomboys • bullying • chat roomCinderella • Cinderella Ate My Daughter • culture of prettydesiredigital mediadigital youthdoll playempowermentFacebookfeminismgendergender performance culture • girlhood • girlsGoogle Inc • Google Talks • identity • identity development • Kaveri Subrahmanyam • Lord and Taylor • market segmentationmedia literacy • media researcher • new medianew technology • nursery colours • overcoding • parent • Peggy Orenstein • performance cultureperformativitypinkpink and prettyplaying with dolls • popular zeitgeist • pornographyprettysextingsexual agencysexualisationsexualitysocial mediasocialisation • Tyler Clementi • young girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2010

Mediated environments: we must learn to write themselves into being

"In everyday interactions, the body serves as a critical site of identity performance. In conveying who we are to other people, we use our bodies to project information about ourselves.[32] This is done through movement, clothes, speech, and facial expressions. What we put forward is our best effort at what we want to say about who we are. Yet while we intend to convey one impression, our performance is not always interpreted as we might expect. Through learning to make sense of others' responses to our behavior, we can assess how well we have conveyed what we intended. We can then alter our performance accordingly. This process of performance, interpretation, and adjustment is what Erving Goffman calls impression management,[33] and is briefly discussed in the introduction to this volume. Impression management is a part of a larger process where people seek to define a situation[34] through their behavior. People seek to define social situations by using contextual cues from the environment around them. Social norms emerge out of situational definitions, as people learn to read cues from the environment and the people present to understand what is appropriate behavior.

Learning how to manage impressions is a critical social skill that is honed through experience. Over time, we learn how to make meaning out of a situation, others' reactions, and what we are projecting of ourselves. As children, we learn that actions on our part prompt reactions by adults; as we grow older, we learn to interpret these reactions and adjust our behavior. Diverse social environments help people develop these skills because they force individuals to reevaluate the signals they take for granted.

The process of learning to read social cues and react accordingly is core to being socialized into a society. While the process itself begins at home for young children, it is critical for young people to engage in broader social settings to develop these skills. Of course, how children are taught about situations and impression management varies greatly by culture,[35] but these processes are regularly seen as part of coming of age. While no one is ever a true master of impression management, the teenage years are ripe with opportunities to develop these skills.

In mediated environments, bodies are not immediately visible and the skills people need to interpret situations and manage impressions are different. As Jenny Sundén argues, people must learn to write themselves into being.[36] Doing so makes visible how much we take the body for granted. While text, images, audio, and video all provide valuable means for developing a virtual presence, the act of articulation differs from how we convey meaningful information through our bodies. This process also makes explicit the self–reflexivity that Giddens argues is necessary for identity formation, but the choices individuals make in crafting a digital body highlight the self–monitoring that Foucault describes.[37]

In some sense, people have more control online–they are able to carefully choose what information to put forward, thereby eliminating visceral reactions that might have seeped out in everyday communication. At the same time, these digital bodies are fundamentally coarser, making it far easier to misinterpret what someone is expressing. Furthermore, as Amy Bruckman shows, key information about a person's body is often present online, even when that person is trying to act deceptively; for example, people are relatively good at detecting when someone is a man even when they profess to be a woman online.[38] Yet because mediated environments reveal different signals, the mechanisms of deception differ.[39] "

(Danah Boyd 2008, p.128–129)

[32] Fred Davis, Fashion, Culture and Identity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992).

[33] Erving Goffman, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life (Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh, 1956).

[34] Erving Goffman, Behavior in Public Places (New York: The Free Press, 1963).

[35] Jean Briggs, Inuit Morality Play: The Emotional Education of a Three–Year–Old (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999).

[36] Jenny Sundén, Material Virtualities (New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2003).

[37] See David Buckingham's introduction to this volume for a greater discussion of this.

[38] Joshua Berman and Amy Bruckman, The Turing Game: Exploring Identity in an Online Environment, Convergence 7, no. 3 (2001): 83–102.

[39] Judith Donath, Identity and Deception in the Virtual Community, Communities in Cyberspace, eds. Marc Smith and Peter Kollock (London: Routledge, 1999).

1). Boyd, D. (2008). Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. D. Buckingham. Cambridge, MA, MIT Press: 119–142.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2010

Just The Facts About Online Youth Victimization Researchers Present the Facts and Debunk Myths

"The nation's foremost academic researchers on child online safety presented their research and answered questions over a luncheon panel on May 3. This was the first time these prominent academics have appeared together to present their research, which, altogether, represents volumes of data on the state of online youth victimization and online youth habits."

(Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee, 3 May 2007)

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2007adolescents • Amanda Lenhart • child pornographychildren • Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee • crimeDanah Boyd • David Finkelhor • digital citizenship • digital youthemotive manipulationethicsexploitationInternet • Internet Education Foundation • Michelle Yberra • online youth victimisationpersonal informationpredatorsafety educationsex offenderssocial networkingsocietyteenager • victimisation • vulnerability • YISS • young peopleyouth • Youth Internet Safety Survey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 MARCH 2009

Charlie bit my finger

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2007 • accidental fame • baby • bite • boysbrotherscandid shotcandid video • Charlie Bit Me (2007) • Charlie Bit My Finger (2007) • Charlie Davies-Carr • childchildhood innocencechildrendigital youthfame • famous • finger • finger-biting • giggle • growing up • Harry Davies-Carr • home video • Howard Davies-Carr • hurt • Internet mememememouth • ouch • painpainful experiencessiblings • that really hurt • user-generated contentvideo sharingviral videoyoung childYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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