Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Gift Culture' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 AUGUST 2012

Teach and Learn Online: Die LMS die! You too PLE!

"The PLE project recognises the fundamental flaws in Virtual Learning Environments or Learning Management Systems (VLE, LMS), but falls short in its vision of an alternative. At this stage in the project it is suggesting that the PLE be a desktop application for a student (sounds a bit like my old Perfect LMS idea) or a singular portal online.

At risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll have to repeat my defining question about Internet enhanced learning, but this time in response to the PLE.

Question to the PLE: Why do we need a PLE when we already have the Internet? The Internet is my PLE, ePortfolio, VLE what ever. Thanks to blogger, bloglines, flickr, delicious, wikispaces, ourmedia, creative commons, and what ever comes next in this new Internet age, I have a strong online ID and very extensive and personalised learning environment. Actually I think the PLE idea is better envisioned by the futurist concept known as the Evolving Personalised Information Construct (EPIC). I think we already have EPIC, so why do we need the PLE?

To extend the statement: We insignificant little teachers and our out of date schools and classrooms don't need to be investing in media projects like VLEs, LMS and even PLEs. Our dam walls of knowledge have burst! and no amount of sand bagging will stop the flood that is clearly discrediting our authority over learning. Media, and with it communications, will evolve (as it certainly has in the last 50 years or more) well beyond the limitations of our classrooms, with investments and broadcast influence we can't even fathom. Why waste our precious money and time on projects that only serve to suspend our true position within that media scape. The PLE makes me think of ELGG, and it all makes me wonder why it is we educationalists still think we are even relevant anymore. The people (yes that includes us) are learning how to read and write for themselves, and in an amazing act of collective generosity, the people are teaching each other – why do they even need our classrooms... is it perhaps only credentialism that we offer? Or is it also sense of security and safety? Is it false?"

(Leigh Blackall, 13 November 2005)

Fig.1 "Lords of Graphite" by 5star (Neil Caldwell).

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TAGS

2005authorised voiceBlogger (software) • Bloglines • broadcast societycentralised platformclassrooms • collective generosity • Creative CommonscredentialismDeliciousdesktop application • desktop classroom • e-portfolio • educationalists • ELGG • EPIC (acronym) • ePortfolio • Evolving Personalised Information Construct • Flickrgift cultureinformation literacy • internet enhanced learning • learning and teaching • learning centre • Learning Management System • learning media • learning platform • learning portal • Leigh Blackall • LMSmedia literacymediascape • network literate • new Internet age • online portal • open Internet • Ourmedia • out of date • personalised learning environment • pervasive mediaPLEschools • singular portal online • virtual learning environmentsVLEWikispaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Scientific publishing: the price of information

"On January 21st Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at Cambridge University, wrote a blog post outlining the reasons for his longstanding boycott of research journals published by Elsevier. This firm, which is based in the Netherlands, owns more than 2,000 journals, including such top–ranking titles as Cell and the Lancet. However Dr Gowers, who won the Fields medal, mathematics's equivalent of a Nobel prize, in 1998, is not happy with it, and he hoped his post might embolden others to do something similar.

It did. More than 2,700 researchers from around the world have so far signed an online pledge set up by Tyler Neylon, a fellow–mathematician who was inspired by Dr Gowers's post, promising not to submit their work to Elsevier's journals, or to referee or edit papers appearing in them. That number seems, to borrow a mathematical term, to be growing exponentially. If it really takes off, established academic publishers might find they have a revolution on their hands. ...

Dr Neylon's petition, though, is symptomatic of a wider conflict between academics and their publishers–a conflict that is being thrown into sharp relief by the rise of online publishing. Academics, who live in a culture which values the free and easy movement of information (and who edit and referee papers for nothing) have long been uncomfortable bedfellows with commercial publishing companies, which want to maximise profits by charging for access to that information, and who control many (although not all) of the most prestigious scientific journals."

(Feb 4th 2012, The Economist)

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TAGS

academicacademic journalacademicsboycott • bundling • Cambridge University • Cell (journal) • Elsevier (publisher) • free access • free and easy movement of information • funded researchgift culture • Lancet (journal) • libraries • Nick Fowler • online publishing • petition • prestigious • publicationpublisherpublishers • publishing companies • referee papers • Research Works Act • scientific journals • subscribe • taxpayer-funded research • The EconomistTimothy Gowers • Tyler Neylon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2011

Drew's Script-O-Rama: free film and TV screenplays since 1995

"It was eons before I discovered that 'lauded' was a good thing.

Anyway, I'm more like that slack–assed buddy who doesn't return your phone calls, has owed you twenty bucks for the last 14 years and flirts with your wife when it comes to updating the site at times. For that I feel shame. Shame, I feel. But hey, it's 2010 now, and I'm a changed man. Besides, don't I get some slack since I've had this site up since 1995? Val Kilmer used to be Batman back then! And Mr. Showbiz left you high and dry, but your friend Drew, he sticks with you while simultaneously referring to himself in the third person!"

(Drew, 2010)

[Note that this site includes a large number of inelegant ads.]

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TAGS

1995artistic practiceauthorauthorshipBatmancharactercharacterisationculture • draft • dramafeature filmfictionfilm genrefilm scriptsfilmmakerfreegenregift cultureHollywoodHollywood movieslinks worklistliterature • Mr. Showbiz • narrative fictionplotprecedencerepositoryresourcescreen culturescreenplay • screenwriter • screenwritingscript • Script-O-Rama • televisiontranscript • Val Kilmer • writing process

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 SEPTEMBER 2010

Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us

"Daniel Pink provides concrete examples of how intrinsic motivation functions both at home and in the workplace."

(Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, 8 April 2010)

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TAGS

Andrew Parkanimated presentationApache Software Foundation (ASF)Apple • Atlassian • autonomy • carrot and stick • cognitive skillscollaboration • Daniel Pink • empowermentengagementfreegift culture • gift economy • ideologyLinux • Madurai • managementmasteryMITmoneymotivationparticipationperformancepunishmentpurposerewardRSA AnimateSkypesocial constructionismUKvolunteervolunteerismWikipedia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2005

Intimate Bureaucracy: experimental art that depends on networks of participants

"I coin the phrase, 'intimate bureaucracy' to capture this type of experimental art that depends on networks of participants. ... These almost opposed values of collective action and self–promotion combined to form the alternative to more hierarchical systems of appraising art works. Mixing the apparently contradictory collective versus conspiratorial action, Boggs' intimate bureaucracy is a poetic use of the trappings of large bureaucratic systems and procedures (e.g., money, receipts, correct change, official letters from bureaucrats, etc.) to create intimate aesthetic situations including the pleasures of sharing a special knowledge or a new language among a small network of participants."
(Craig Saper)

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TAGS

collective actioncounterfeit • Craig Saper • exchangegift culture • intimate bureaucracy • J. S. G. Boggs • money • networks of participants • participationtransaction
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