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Which clippings match 'Narrative Photography' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 OCTOBER 2015

Taking re-focusable photos with the Lytro Illum camera

"LYTRO ILLUM is the first high-end camera to harness the entire light field – to retain the richness and depth of a scene. Explore focus, perspective, and depth of field within a single image and render full-color, 3-D living pictures. Use the Lytro Desktop application to adjust a wide range of photographic parameters, including the scene's depth of field, and transform those pictures into immersive cinematic animations."

(Lytro, Inc.)

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TAGS

angular variation • camera • depth information • depth of fielddepth of focusdepth-sensing cameradigital cameradirectional information • focal distance • focus spread • image capture • image focus • image sensor • interactive photography • interactive re-focusable pictures • light field • light field camera • light field technology • light rays • light-field photography • live view • living pictures • Lytro Illum • megaray • megaray sensor • mise-en-scenenarrative photographyperspective viewphotography • plenoptic camera • plenoptic image • plenoptic photography • point of focus • post-processing • post-shot refocusing • re-editable • re-focusable • refocus • refocused • refocusing • relative focus • Ren Ng • stereophotography • two-dimensional representation • visual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Hannah Starkey: reconstructed scenes from everyday life

"Using actors within carefully considered settings, Hannah Starkey's photographs reconstruct scenes from everyday life with the concentrated stylisation of film. Starkey's images picture women engaged in regular routines such as loitering in the street, sitting in cafes, or passively shopping. Starkey captures these generic 'in between' moments of daily life with a sense of relational detachment. Her still images operate as discomforting 'pauses'; where the banality of existence is freeze–framed in crisis point, creating reflective instances of inner contemplation, isolation, and conflicting emotion.

Through the staging of her scenes, Starkey's images evoke suggestive narratives through their appropriation of cultural templates: issues of class, race, gender, and identity are implied through the physical appearance of her models or places. Adopting the devices of filmography, Starkey's images are intensified with a pervasive voyeuristic intrusion, framing moments of intimacy for unapologetic consumption. Starkey often uses composition to heighten this sense of personal and emotional disconnection, with arrangements of lone figures separated from a group, or segregated with metaphoric physical divides such as tables or mirrors.

Often titling her work as Untitled, followed by a generalised date of creation, her photographs parallel the interconnected vagueness of memory, recalling suggestions of events and emotions without fixed location or context. Her work presents a platform where fiction and reality are blurred, illustrating the gap between personal fragility and social construction, and merging the experiences of strangers with our own."

(Saatchi Gallery)

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artificeawkwardnessbanalitycinematic conventionscultural appropriationcultural signals • cultural templates • daily lifedetachmentemotionlesseveryday lifefiction and realityfilm stylisationframed momentsfreeze frame • Hannah Starkey • in-betweenin-between narratives • inner contemplation • intimacyintrospectionisolation • loitering • momentsnarrative photographynarrative scenesobservationpausephotographyplaceness • regular routines • routineSaatchi Galleryscene reconstructionsettingstagingstylisedsuggestive narrativesvignette • voyeuristic intrusion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Tabitha Soren: in-between narratives capturing stories in flux

"Sometimes it's simply looking at a particular behavior in a new way that evokes a range of emotions. Photographer Tabitha Soren has created a series of photographs, Running, that stir up feelings of panic, tension, curiosity, and concern. Tabitha's photographs have power in their simplicity, and it's as if one edge of her photograph is the past and one is the future, creating an in–between narrative that captures a story in flux. As viewers, we are caught in a pivotal moment of cinematic tension, requiring us to imagine what came before and what comes after each image. The photographs become a series of short stories that seem to shout 'get me the hell out of here.'"

(Aline Smithson, 23 May 2012, Lenscratch)

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a story in flux • arresting imagesarresting time • cinematic photography • cinematic tensionconcerncuriosityemotionfeelings of panicget me the hell out of here • in flux • in media resin-betweenin-between narratives • influx • lookingnarrative photographynarrative scenespanicphotographerphotographspivotal momentrunningseries • series of photographs • series of short storiesslice of frozen timeslicedstasis • stir up feelings of panic • story • Tabitha Soren • tensionvisual spectaclewhat came beforewhat comes afterwoman photographerworld of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2008

Cindy Sherman’s work functions seamlessly (and successfully) within late capitalist society

"Although [Cindy] Sherman is often heralded as the quintessential 'postmodern' artist, the modernist tendencies of her work coupled with the critics' inability to confront the ambiguity of her work, have rendered her 'postmodern' label problematic. Postmodern theory advocates a deconstruction of the power structures embedded in late capitalist society. But Sherman's work functions seamlessly (and successfully) within the market strategies of the '80s, typified by corporate control of museums and market control of galleries. Given that her work can be read as both a challenge to the art market and a creative, marketable product, the boundary between postmodern critique of the market and marketability has clearly been eroded. While critics applaud Sherman's work for deconstructively denying the totality of a 'real Cindy', the meaning of her work is dependent upon the concept of the celebrity 'Cindy'. Simultaneously, critics partially negate her 'deconstruction', mythologizing her as the autonomous 'artist–genius', harkening back to the modernist heroization of the creative individual. On one level, Sherman's work appears to be subversively linked to 'low' art characterized by 'b–grade' film and photography, on another level, her work is fetishized as the modernist ideal of the 'high' art object."
(Nadine Lemmon)

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1980sambiguityartart marketart objectartist • artist-genius • authorship • b-grade • b-moviecapitalismcelebrityCindy Shermancreative practicecritiquecultural signalsculture jammingdeconstruction • film still • film stylisationgenius • heroine • late capitalist society • low art • modernismmuseummythologynarrative photographyphotographyPostmodernpowerpower structuresproductsexual fetish

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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