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10 FEBRUARY 2012

Courtney Johnston: crowdsourcing weather and food history

"Taking the digital pulse of libraries, galleries and museums, looking at new and interesting ways to access and interact with collections from all over the world."

(Radio New Zealand, 30 November 2011 Radio New Zealand)

[Courtney Johnston takes time out of the National Digital Forum (http://ndf.natlib.govt.nz/about/2011Programme.htm) to talk to Radio New Zealand's Kathryn Ryan about crowdsourcing weather and food history. Read more on her blog at: http://best–of–3.blogspot.com/2011/12/day–after.html]



Old Weather, National Maritime Museum, London: a citizen–science project where volunteers are helping transcribe the logbooks of Royal Navy ships from around the time of World War One.
What's on the menu, New York Public Library: learning what people were eating a century ago in New York by transcribing NYPL's special collection of historical menus
Australian Dress Register: Collecting examples and information about clothing in New South Wales before 1945, from public and private collections.
Remix and Mash up competitions: Mix and Mash winners LibraryHack winners.

TAGS

2011accessAotearoa New Zealandarchives • Australian Dress Register • Boost New Media • Brenda Leeuwenberg • conference • Courtney Johnston • crowdsourcingdatabaseDickens Journals Onlinedigital collectionsdigital heritage • digital pulse • digitisationfandom • food history • galleries • historical menus • history • Kathryn Ryan • libraries • menus collection • museumMuseum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa • National Digital Forum • NDF • Nine to Noon • Old Weather • Radio New Zealand • transcribe • weather • weather history • Wellington

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 AUGUST 2010

The UK Soundmap project: mapping Britain's sonic environment

"The SoundMap is a partnership project of the British Library and the Noise Futures Network. It uses widely available mobile technology in a novel way to capture and aggregate research–quality audio samples. Your recordings will be studied by experts from the Noise Futures Network and we shall post an overview of the research results once sufficient data has been collected and analysed.

Britain's sonic environment is ever changing. Urbanisation, transport developments, climate change and even everyday lifestyles all affect our built and natural soundscapes. The sounds around us have an impact on our well being. Some sounds have a positive or calming influence. Others can be intrusive and disturbing or even affect our health. By capturing sounds of today and contributing to the British Library's digital collections you can help build a permanent researchable resource."

(The British Library Board)

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TAGS

around usaudioaudio samplesbelongingcitycollectiveconvergencecountrysideculturedigital collectionsenvironmenteverydayexperiencegeographylifestylelocationlocation-specificmobilemobile technology • natural soundscapes • Noise Futures Network • placeplace-based contentrecordingresearchresourcesocial changesonic environmentsound • SoundMap • soundscapetechnologyUKurbanisationwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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