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Which clippings match 'Audio Samples' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 AUGUST 2014

How we made the pop song 19 by Paul Hardcastle

"Then, one night, I was watching TV and happened to tape a documentary–it was ABC's Vietnam Requiem–about the war. When I watched it back, what struck me was how young the soldiers were: the documentary said their average age was 19. I was out having fun in pubs and clubs when I was 19, not being shoved into jungles and shot at. One line–'None of them received a hero's welcome'–really struck a chord. When the soldiers came home, people wondered what had happened to the smiling kids who went out there. What did they expect if they'd been through that shit?

I started messing around and adding music to the narrative. The main sound was electro–I was hugely into Afrika Bambaataa at the time–but I added a bit of jazz and a nice melody. I used an Emu Emulator, an early type of sampler that had a two–second limit when it came to doing samples. That's why the hook was 'N–n–n–nineteen'. It was the only bit of the narrative that made sense in two seconds."

(Interviews by Dave Simpson, The Guardian, 24 September 2012)

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TAGS

19 (song) • 1980s1985Afrika Bambaataa • anti-war message • audio collageaudio samplesaverage age • British musician • critical commentary • crowd noise • dance musicdestructiondriving beat • Emu Emulator • interview dialogue • Mike Oldfield • military bugle call • news report • nineteen • North America • Paul Hardcastle • Peter Thomas • post-traumatic stress disorder • processed speech • remixsampled musicsamplessoldierspoken-word samplingstutter effect • top selling single • United States Armed Forcesveteran • Vietnam Requiem (1984) • Vietnam warwaryoung men

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 AUGUST 2010

The UK Soundmap project: mapping Britain's sonic environment

"The SoundMap is a partnership project of the British Library and the Noise Futures Network. It uses widely available mobile technology in a novel way to capture and aggregate research–quality audio samples. Your recordings will be studied by experts from the Noise Futures Network and we shall post an overview of the research results once sufficient data has been collected and analysed.

Britain's sonic environment is ever changing. Urbanisation, transport developments, climate change and even everyday lifestyles all affect our built and natural soundscapes. The sounds around us have an impact on our well being. Some sounds have a positive or calming influence. Others can be intrusive and disturbing or even affect our health. By capturing sounds of today and contributing to the British Library's digital collections you can help build a permanent researchable resource."

(The British Library Board)

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TAGS

around usaudioaudio samplesbelongingcitycollectiveconvergencecountrysideculturedigital collectionsenvironmenteverydayexperiencegeographylifestylelocationlocation-specificmobilemobile technology • natural soundscapes • Noise Futures Network • placeplace-based contentrecordingresearchresourcesocial changesonic environmentsound • SoundMap • soundscapetechnologyUKurbanisationwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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