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Which clippings match 'New York Times' keyword pg.1 of 3
15 AUGUST 2017

Cognitive closure and the price of certainty

"during times of fear and anxiety — like, for example, right now — everybody’s need for closure increases. We tend to make judgments more quickly, regardless of the facts. We’re also drawn to leaders who are decisive and paint solutions in simple terms. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Dr. Kruglanski and his team of researchers found that as the color-coded terrorism threat system increased, support for President George W. Bush went up accordingly. The more uncertain our world seems, the more we compensate by seeking out certainty."

(Daniele Anastasion, 1 November 2016, The New York Times)

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TAGS

2016 • alt-right • ambiguityappeal to emotion • Arie Kruglanski • be vigilant • binary thinking • cognitive closure • cognitive flexibilitycolour codingcomplex problem-solvingcomplexityconfused and disorientedconservatism • conservative thought • contradictory perspectivescritical thinking • Daniele Anastasion • decision-making capabilitiesdestabilised perceptionDonald Trump • Eric Strauss • exploiting fearsextremismfear mongeringfound to be true by manygaslightingGeorge W Bushgullibilityliberal tolerancemainstream medianationalism • need for certainty • need for closure • New York TimesOp-Docsperceptions of reality • personal agency • polarised politics • post-truth worldrhetorical fearscare tacticsscaremongeringSeptember 11 attacksshort documentarysimple evaluationssocial psychologysound judgmentspreading of fear • terrorism threat system • terrorist threat • times of fear and anxiety • truth • uncertain world • uncertainty • uncertainty avoidance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JUNE 2017

Sowing Climate Doubt Among Schoolteachers Through Unscientific Propaganda

"The book [Why Scientists Disagree about Global Warming] is unscientific propaganda from authors with connections to the disinformation-machinery of the Heartland Institute. In a recent letter to his members, David L. Evans, executive director of the National Science Teachers Association, said that 'labeling propaganda as science does not make it so.' He called the institute’s mass mailing of the book an 'unprecedented attack' on science education.

Judging from the responses of educators I know who have received 'Why Scientists Disagree About Global Warming' in recent weeks, most copies of it are likely to be ignored or discarded. But if only a small percentage of teachers use it as intended, they could still mislead tens of thousands of students with it year after year."

(Curt Stager, 27 April 2017, The New York Times)

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TAGS

2015 • 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference • Breitbart • climate changeclimate change casualty • climate change denialists • climate change propaganda • climate change scepticismclimate contrarians • climate crisis • climate experts • climate reconstructions • climate science skeptics • climate scientists • conservative think tank • creationism • creationist perspectives • dishonesty • Energy Makes America Great • explanation of phenomena • fake science • false assertions • false premise • fossil fuel emissions • global warming • human-driven climate change • ice cores • Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change • IPCC • Joseph Bast • lake sediments • Marita Noon • misrepresentationNew York Times • paleoclimatology • propagandaresponsibility • school teachers • science educators • scientific consensus • scientific evidence • solar activity • The Heartland Institute • the role of human activity on climate change • tree ringsunnatural phenomenon • volcanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2015

Illuminating North Korea by photojournalist David Guttenfelder

Fig.1 "Illuminating North Korea", photographs and video by David Guttenfelder, 10 June 2015, The New York Times.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MAY 2015

Welcome to our corporate-controlled future Internet with Facebook Instant Articles et al.

"There's a generational shift in technology happening right now: From the open Web to native apps, from desktops to mobile phones, from platforms built on standards to platforms owned by corporations. Let's call it the second Internet. Here's what it looks like: "Facebook Instant Article". That's right — it's Facebook. More than 1.44 billion people use Facebook every month, and almost a billion of them use it every day. The majority do so via the Facebook app on their phones.

Think about that: A decade ago, the majority of people using the Internet were doing so on desktop computers or laptops, accessing HTML and JavaScript websites. Today, a vast number — maybe not a majority, but a lot — experience the Internet primarily through Facebook's mobile app.

That's why publishers like the New York Times, Buzzfeed, and National Geographic were so eager to test out Facebook's new Instant Articles platform.

This platform puts publishers' stories directly into the Facebook app (on iOS only, for now), where they load more quickly than they would if Facebook just linked to the publishers' websites — which take an average of eight seconds to load, Facebook says. Instant Articles also offer a variety of snazzy tools for publishers to present their images and interactive elements."

(Dylan Tweney, 15 May 15 2015, VentureBeat)

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TAGS

2015boundaries in cyberspace • Buzzfeed • closed systemcontent integrationcontent publishers • corporate exclusivity • corporate-controlled environment • corporatisationexclusivityFacebook app • Facebook Instant Articles • framed by the windowfunctionalist paradigm • future Internet • homogenizationhypermediated spaceimmediacy of experience • Instant Articles platform • instrumental rationalitylisablelogic of hypermediacymobile appsNational Geographic • native apps • New York Timesopen webperformativityproduct usabilitypublishing platform • Slack (app) • sterile placestechnology transparencyunified mediumuniformityusability engineering • VentureBeat • walled garden • window on to the world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2012

Small business marketing: tweeting globally, accessed locally

"SAN FRANCISCO – Three weeks after Curtis Kimball opened his crème brûlée cart in San Francisco, he noticed a stranger among the friends in line for his desserts. How had the man discovered the cart? He had read about it on Twitter.

For Mr. Kimball, who conceded that he 'hadn't really understood the purpose of Twitter,' the beauty of digital word–of–mouth marketing was immediately clear. He signed up for an account and has more than 5,400 followers who wait for him to post the current location of his itinerant cart and list the flavors of the day, like lavender and orange creamsicle.

'I would love to say that I just had a really good idea and strategy, but Twitter has been pretty essential to my success,' he said. He has quit his day job as a carpenter to keep up with the demand.

Much has been made of how big companies like Dell, Starbucks and Comcast use Twitter to promote their products and answer customers' questions. But today, small businesses outnumber the big ones on the free microblogging service, and in many ways, Twitter is an even more useful tool for them."

(Claire Cain Miller, 22 July 2009, New York Times)

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TAGS

ad budget • advertising and marketing • advertising strategy • being discovered • big companies • cart • Coca-Cola • Comcast • creme brulee cart • current location • Curtis Kimball • customers • Dell • desserts • digital word-of-mouth marketing • e-commerce business • fresh • itinerant cart • little-bitty store • little-bitty town • local businesslocal businesseslocalisationMcDonaldsmicroblogging • mom-and-pop shops • multiplatform marketers • New York Times • promote products • San Franciscoshopping behavioursmall businesssmall businesses • small-business owners • social mediaStarbucks • supersmall businesses • sushi restaurant • tactical engagementTweetDeckTwitter • Twitter followers • Twitter localisation • Umi (restaurant) • word of mouth • word-of-mouth • word-of-mouth promotion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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