Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Experimental' keyword pg.1 of 3
02 APRIL 2012

Disinformation: 'The Origin of Painting'

"The Origin of Painting' by Disinformation – luminous graffiti, live electromagnetic sound and shadow photography, autodestructive portraiture and experimental painting installation, live at Fabrica Gallery, Brighton, UK, Nov 2001. A huge new version of 'The Origin of Painting' features in 'The Party Project' fiesta (organised by J&B, Diageo and Advanced Music / Sonar Festival) – a major exhibition of urban street art and graffiti culture that tours Seville, Madrid, Valencia, Barcelona, La Coruña, Malaga in July and August 2008. …

This Disinformation installation was first exhibited under the title 'Artificial Lightning' at The Hayward Gallery in London in April 2000. The installation takes its current name from the painting 'The Maid of Corinth, or The Origin of Painting' depicted by Joseph 'Wright of Derby' in 1782 (and Disinformation's tribute was exhibited at Q Arts, 35 Queen Street, Derby in June 2004, just a few doors from Wright's former home at 26 Queen Street, Derby). This exhibit also inspired the production 'Luminous' by experimental choreographer Saburo Teshigawara, on which Disinformation worked with the Japanese dance company Karas. 'The Origin of Painting' also inspired a project called 'Anti Matter' (exhibited at Huddersfield, Wrexham etc) – a Disinformation video which explores themes suggested by ideas of the physicist Paul Dirac."

('Disinformation' Aka Joe Banks, YouTube)

1

TAGS

1782 • 2001 • Anti Matter (installation) • art installation • Artificial Lightning (installation) • autodestructive portraiture • Disinformation (pseudonym) • electromagnetic sound • experimental • experimental painting installation • graffiti culture • Joe Banks • Joseph Wright of Derby • live performanceluminous • luminous graffiti • painting • Paul Dirac • Saburo Teshigawarashadowshadow photography • The Origin of Painting • This Disinformation (installation) • UK • urban street art • virtual graffitivisual spectaclevisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2012

The Interactive Institute: Swedish experimental design research centre

"The Interactive Institute is a Swedish experimental IT & design research institute that conducts world–class applied research and innovation. With pioneering spirit and courage, we challenge prevailing norms in technology and design. Our process is based on people's future needs and potential with a vision to improve everyday life for a creative and sustainable society. The results are developed in close collaboration with industry and society.

We develop new research areas, concepts, products and services, and provide strategic advice to corporations and public organizations. Our results are communicated and exhibited worldwide and brought out to society through commissioned work, license agreements and spin–off companies.

Over the course of a decade, the Interactive Institute has established itself at the forefront of research and development in design, data visualization, sustainability and entertainment, positioning Sweden as a leading force in the lifestyle technology research sector. The Interactive Institute has worked systematically to identify new research fields and to create pioneering projects within these with great potential for innovation. The projects have given rise to larger research programs and funding initiatives that not only have created renewal within Swedish research, but also played an important part for Swedish industry, regional development and the image of Sweden as an innovative nation.

Since the start in 1998, our work has been characterized not only in the way we conduct traditional academic research but also in our exploration of the borders between art, design and technology in industrial and academic settings as well as public and private sectors. With our expertise, we bring an innovative edge into policy work, we connect stakeholders for extraordinary synergies, we bring renewal to traditional industry and we add context and involvement to the processes we are involved in. In bringing together our knowledge of business and creative values with world–class research results, we offer a unique set of skills to the Swedish research and innovation sector in the international arena.

The Interactive Institute has 50 employees per December 2010, and is organized around studios localized in Piteå, Umeå, Stockholm, Eskilstuna, Norrköping and Gothenburg. The headquarters is situated in Stockholm/Kista. The Interactive Institute is a non profit distributing organization."

(The Interactive Institute)

1

TAGS

1998applied research • art design and technology • collaboration with industry • data visualisationdesign • distributing organisation • everyday lifeexperimentalfuture needsHCIinnovation • IT and design • lifestyle technology research • new research areas • new research fields • non profit • pioneering projects • private sectorproducts and servicespublic sectorregional developmentresearch and developmentresearch centreresearch institutespin-off companies • strategic advice • sustainabilitysustainable societySwedentechnology and design • The Interactive Institute

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

The AHRC definition for Speculative Research

"The broad aim of this route is to support high–quality research where the speculative, experimental or exploratory nature of the work means that results or outcomes are uncertain or cannot be guaranteed, or where a significant degree of risk is involved."

(University of Glamorgan)

1

TAGS

AHRCapplied researchartistic practicediscoveryexperimentalexperimentation • exploratory • exploratory projects • high-risk • riskspeculative research • speculative research grants • theory building • uncertain • University of Glamorgan

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2011

1970 reconstruction of Oskar Schlemmer's 1926 Triadisches Ballett

"Video de la reconstrucción del Ballet triádico hecha por Margarete Hastings en 1970. El video completo dura 32 minutos. Esta versión contó con la asesoría de Ludwig Grote y Xanti Schawinsky (alumnos de Schlemmer en la Bauhaus) y de Tut Schlemmer, la viuda de Oskar Schlemmer. La música es de Erich Ferstl. Está dividido en tres partes: amarillo, rosa y negro. Esta versión es una reconstrucción basada en la documentación sobre el ballet triàdico."

(http://triadicos.wordpress.com)

Fig.1–3 Marianne Hasting, Franz Schömbs (1970). "Triadisches Ballett", Dancers: Edith Demharter, Ralph Smolik and Hannes Winkler

Fig.4 Triadic Ballet costumes by Oskar Schlemmer, Metropol Theatre, Berlin 1926

1

TAGS

19261970artavant-gardeballetBauhaus SchoolBerlinblackchoreographycolourcostumecostume designcreative practicedancedesign formalism • Edith Demharter • Erich Ferstl • experimentalfigures in space • Franz Schombs • Hannes Winkler • Ludwig Grote • Marianne Hasting • Metropol Theatre • movement • Oskar Schlemmer • performancepink • Ralph Smolik • reconstructionrecorded movementreenactment • Triadic Ballet • Triadisches Ballett • Tut Schlemmer • visual designvisual spectacleXanti Schawinskyyellow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2011

The Fluxus Reader offers the first comprehensive overview on this challenging and controversial group

"Fluxus began in the 1950s as a loose, international community of artists, architects, composers and designers. By the 1960s, Fluxus has become a laboratory of ideas and an arena for artistic exprmentation in Europe, Asia and the United States. Described as 'the most radical and experimental art movement of the 1960s', Fluxus challenged conventional thinking on art and culture for over four decades. It had a central role in the birth of such key contemporary art forms as concept art, installation, performance art, intermedia and video. Despite this influence, the scope and scale of this unique phenomenon have made it difficult to explain Fluxus in normative historical and critical terms. The Fluxus Reader offers the first comprehensive overview on this challenging and controversial group. The Fluxus Reader is written by leading scholars and experts from Europe and the United States."

(Ken Friedman, Swinburne Research Bank)

Fig.1 Robert Watts (1965). 'TV Dinner' from the exhibition Art in Our Time: 1950 to the Present, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, September 5, 1999 to September 2, 2001.

1

TAGS

1950sarchitectsart and cultureart movement • artistic experimentation • artistic practiceartistsAsiaAustraliaavant-gardechallenging conventional thinking • composers • concept art • contemporary art forms • creative practicecritiquedesignersEuropeexperimentalFluxus • Fluxus Reader • installationintermediainternational communityjournal • laboratory of ideas • North Americaperformance artpre-prepared mealradical • Swinburne University • video art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.