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Which clippings match 'British Film Institute' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 JULY 2015

Britain on Film: collection of archive footage goes online today

"Around 2,500 films including home movies, documentaries and news footage from Victorian times up to the 1980s is now available online.

The grainy footage is of dozens of shifty men in flat caps, smoking cigarettes, talking to each other in a market square, some exchanging money, others nervously keeping watch. And then men in trilbies spring from nowhere, making arrests and bundling people into vans. The remarkable surveillance footage is from 1935 and is significant because it was the first film used as evidence in a British court of law. Police, or specifically PC Saunders – proudly named in the end credit – filmed what was an illegal betting ring going on in Chesterfield’s market square.

The film is one of around 2,500 from the BFI archives – that are now accessible online, via the BFI Player, from Tuesday as part of a huge project called Britain on Film. They include home movies, documentaries and news footage from Victorian times to as recently as 1980."

(Mark Brown, 07 July 2015)

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1935BFI • BFI archives • BFI National Archive • BFI Player • Britain on Film • British Film Institute • court of law • cultural heritagedigitisation projectfilm archive • flat cap • grainy footage • illegal behaviour • illegal betting ring • market square • national cultural heritage onlinenational film archivenews footagepolice • shifty men • social history • surveillance footage • trilby

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2012

World's first colour film footage viewed for first time

"'It's very significant indeed, it's the world's first natural colour film and the fact that it's a Brit who invented it is fantastic.'

Bryony Dixon, curator of silent film at the British Film Institute (BFI) National Archives, said the 1902 footage was of international significance for the cinema world.

The films were made by Edward Raymond Turner from London who patented his colour process on 22 March, 1899. Some of the footage features Mr Turner's children in the garden of their home in Hounslow."

(12 September 2012, BBC News)

The world's first colour moving pictures dating from 1902 have been found by the National Media Museum in Bradford after lying forgotten in a tin for 110 years.

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1902BFIBFI National ArchiveBritish Film Institute • Charles Urban • cinema • cinema apparatus • colour • colour effect • colour filmcolour process • colour reproduction • cultural history • Edward Raymond Turner • George Albert Smith • historical importancehistory of cinema • international significance • invention • invention of cinema • Kinemacolour • mechanical deviceNational Media Museumnatural colour • natural colour film • non-standard size • pioneeringprojectorsilent cinemasilent filmTechnicolortechnology innovationUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2012

BFI National Archive: Inview online

"Welcome to BFI InView. Here you will find over 2,000 non–fiction film and television titles from the 20th century to the early 21st. InView is easily searchable, comprehensively catalogued and clearly organised under six main Themes, each with an introductory essay by an academic historian."

(British Film Institute, 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2011

Video for Wikipedia: Guide to Best Practices

"This new effort takes advantage of a movement toward open video – a movement that has its roots in the free software movement that is largely powering the web today and which, through companies such as Apache, IBM, Mozilla, Oracle and Red Hat, has resulted in trillions of dollars of value creation for the stakeholders involved. The open or open–source video movement recognizes the contributions from, but also the limitations inherent in, the video work of industry leaders such as Adobe, Apple, and Microsoft. Flash, Quicktime, Windows Media and Silverlight are handsome technologies. But they have been developed and controlled by commercial companies that often protect themselves against innovations by outside coders, designers, developers, programmers – technologists, lawyers, producers, and educators keen to move away from proprietary solutions that are delivered for the benefit of shareholders first and the billions of everyday people who connect via the web a pale second.

The open video movement recognizes the importance of rights and licensing strategies designed to create profit or serve national interests, but it is critical of systems that prohibit access to film and sound assets becoming part of our collective audiovisual canon. Many film and sound resources digitized for preservation, for example, do not appear online because of dated copyright rules; and some of the great investments (millions of dollars in fact) by, for example, the U.K. government in film and sound resource digitization result in materials being put online only behind educational and national paywalls that keep students in Nairobi and Nashville from using London–based resources in their work.

Enabling video to catch up to the open–source movement on the web goes to the heart of our efforts to improve our understanding of the world. The central technologies of the web – HTML, HTTP, and TCP/IP – are open for all to build upon and improve, and video's future should be similarly unobstructed."

(Peter B. Kaufman, 2010)

Fig.1 Kid Kameleon, CC BY SA NC

2). Video for Wikipedia and the Open Web October 2010 An Intelligent Television White Paper PETER B. KAUFMAN INTELLIGENT TELEVISION WWW.INTELLIGENTTELEVISION.COM THE OPEN VIDEO ALLIANCE Version 1.0

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2010AdobeAdobe FlashApache Software Foundation (ASF)AppleaudiovisualBBC archiveBritish Film InstituteBritish Governmentcontent rightscopyrightcopyright rulesdigitisation • educational paywalls • film resources • free software movement • HTML • HTTP • IBMinnovationLibrary of Congress • licensing strategies • media resources • MicrosoftMITMozillaNairobi • Nashville • national paywalls • open sourceopen video • open-source movement • open-source video movement • Oracle Corporation • ownership • paywall • preservation • proprietary solutions • proprietary technologiesQuickTime • Red Hat (Linux) • remix cultureSilverlightsound resources • U.S. National Archives • value creationWikipedia • Windows Media • Yale University

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2010

BFI gets Halas & Batchelor animation archive

"the husband and wife–run Halas & Batchelor, sometimes called the British Disney–which for more than 50 years produced adverts, public information pieces, feature films, TV cartoons and serious award–winning animation respected the world over.

Today, 15 years after the studio's last release, the British Film Institute will announce that it has been given the Halas & Batchelor archive, including film prints, stills, scripts, correspondence and original cells. It is the largest ever single donation of British animation and was welcomed as 'an extraordinarily rich gift' by the BFI director, Amanda Nevill. 'We look forward to working on ensuring these films and artefacts are enjoyed by the widest possible group of people in years to come,' she said. ...

Curator Jez Stewart hopes that the BFI will be now be able to open up Halas & Batchelor to new generations of animation fans and practitioners. Aardman Animation's Nick Park said he had fond memories of watching the company's animated educational films at school. 'They have always been part of my life,' he said. 'John Halas was the judge on the first animated competition I ever entered–I didn't win, but admired him and looked up to him as a great figure in British animation.'"

(Mark Brown, 3 December 2010, The Guardian)

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19401954advertadvertising • Amanda Nevill • Animal Farm (1954)animationart historyartefactBFIBritainBritish animationBritish Film Institutecartooncollectioncommercial • Corn Flakes • donationfeature filmfilm • film print • Halas and BatchelorheritagehistoryJohn HalasJoy BatchelorKelloggsLondon • pioneers • political allegorypublic informationpublic information filmscript • stills • studioTVVivien HalasWalt Disney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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