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Which clippings match 'New Zealand On Screen' keyword pg.2 of 2
26 JULY 2011

Mana Waka: feature-length documentary showing the re-building of the seven wakataua/war canoes of the Great Maori Fleet

"Mana Waka, working title Canoe, is a feature–length documentary made to launch New Zealand's 1990 centennial celebrations. The documentary has a fascinating history. Princess Te Puea Herangi of the Turangawaewae Marae, Ngauruawahia, was a great Maori leader committed to work that would uphold, and be used for the benefit of, the Maori people. During the late 1930s she conceived the idea of celebrating the 1940 centennial of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by re–building the seven wakataua/war canoes of the Great Fleet, According to legend these canoes had journeyed from Hawaiki to Aotearoa some 25 generations previously. Princess Te Puea asked stills photographer R.G.H. (Jim) Manley, who had not previously made a film, to film the re–building, and he did so over a period of three years. Up north in the Puketi Forest, a great kauri tree was felled for the building of the Nga–toki–matawhaorua canoe which is now housed at Waitangi. Two totara trees from the Oruanui Forest provided the timber for the canoes that were carved and built at Turangawaewae."

(Helen Martin, 8 July 2011, Onfilm Magazine)

Fig.1 Still from "Mana Waka": NZ 1990 Documentary prod co Nga Kaitiaki o Te Puea Estate and the Turangawaewae Marae Trust dir Merata Mita camera R.G.H. Manly (filmed 1937 – 1940) ed Annie Collins kai korero/narrator Tukuroirangi Morgan film preservation Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga The New Zealand Film Commission, Ngā Kaitiaki Ō Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua The New Zealand Film Archive, NFU Laboratory, NFU Sound finecut Nga Kaitiaki o Te Marae o Turangawaewae sound Merata Mita, David Madigan, Chris Verberg, Mike Hedges, Annie Collins. 85 minutes.

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TAGS

1930s193719401990Annie CollinsAotearoa New Zealandcanoecarvingcentennialcraftcultural heritagedocumentaryfeature-length documentaryfilm • Great Fleet • Hawaiki • heritageIndigenous • Jim Manley • kauri • Mana Waka (film) • MaoriMaori peopleMerata MitaNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • Nga Kaitiaki O Nga Taonga Whitiahua The New Zealand Film Archive • Ngauruawahia • NZ Film Archive • Oruanui Forest • photographerpreservation • Princess Te Puea Herangi • Puketi Forest • Te Tiriti o Waitangi • Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga The New Zealand Film Commission • totara • Treaty of Waitangi • Tukuroirangi Morgan • Turangawaewae Marae Trust • Waikato • wakataua • war canoes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2011

Annie Collins on her 30 year career cutting New Zealand films

"Editor Annie Collins has worked with some of New Zealand's most provocative directors, including Barry Barclay (The Neglected Miracle), and Merata Mita (Patu!) over a 30 year editing career. Collins has also edited key feature films, (Scarfies, Out of the Blue) and was part of the editing team on Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings.

NZ On Screen's Clare O'Leary visits Collins at her home and Collins reflects on:

Her beginnings in the industry and being convinced by producer Pat Cox to shelve her design training and become an editor.

What she requires of directors ('that they've done their homework!')

Cutting Patu! with Merata Mita: evading the police and becoming conscious of the Springbok Tour Protests' relevance to New Zealand history and realising the (different) echoes it had for Mita as a Māori filmmaker.

Working with director Robert Sarkies on Scarfies and Out of the Blue

The four and a half years she spent working on the Lord of the Rings trilogy and the realisation that despite the 'profound experience' of working on such a massive scale project that she needed to get back to New Zealand stories.

Her consciousness of the power of the edit: 'it takes about five seconds for you to destroy somebody in a cut, or edit, on national TV.'

The ethics of story–telling: the need for the people who are involved in a documentary (or a story where the subjects are still alive) to follow 'good process' and the importance of 'clarity of mind and heart.'"

(Clare O'Leary, 12 February 2009, NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 direction and Interview – Clare O'Leary, camera and editing – Leo Guerchmann

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TAGS

1981 Springbok rugby tourAnnie CollinsAotearoa New ZealandAramoana • Barry Barclay • creative practicedesign trainingdocumentaryethics • film directors • film editorfilm industryfilmmaking • Graeme Tuckets • historyLord of the RingsMaoriMerata MitaNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand filmmaker • New Zealand history • New Zealand on Screen • New Zealand stories • NZ On Screen • Out of the Blue • Pat Cox • Patu!Peter Jacksonpost productionRobert Sarkies • Ruby & Rata • Scarfies • Springbok Tour • storytelling • Ted Coubray • The Neglected Miracle • women in film

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JULY 2010

NZ on Screen: An Archive of Aotearoa New Zealand Screen Culture

"In 2007 NZ On Air initiated the NZ On Screen project as an integral part of its digital strategy. Since 1989 NZ On Air has funded over 15,000 hours of local television production. Much of this content, as well as thousands more hours supported by broadcasters, film investors and other funding sources, is not easily accessible to the public.

NZ On Screen is unlocking the treasure chest, providing access to the wealth of television, film, music video and new media produced in NZ, along with knowledgeable background information."

(New Zealand on Screen)

Fig.1 Murphy, G. (1981). Goodbye Pork Pie. Aotearoa New Zealand, NZ Film.
Fig.2 Tamahori, L. (1994). Once Were Warriors. Aotearoa New Zealand, New Zealand Film Commission
Fig.3 Ballantyne, A. (2009). The Strength of Water. Aotearoa New Zealand, NZ Film.

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TAGS

19892007Aotearoa New Zealandarchivebroadcastcontentculturedigital strategyfilmfilm makingfilmmakerfundinginvestmentiwilocal television productionMaori • Maori Television • mediamedia culturemoving imagemusic videoNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on ScreenNZ Film ArchiveNZ On Screenold mediaproductionscreen culture • Te Mangai Paho • televisionTVNZ • TVNZ Archives

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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