Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'New Zealand On Screen' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 AUGUST 2016

1974 documentary about Aotearoa New Zealand artist Ralph Hotere

"Directed by Sam Pillsbury, this 1974 film observes Ralph Hotere — one of New Zealand's greatest artists — at a moment when excitement is gathering about his work. Lauded as a 'classic' by Ian Wedde, the documentary is framed around the execution of a watershed piece: a large mural Hotere was commissioned to paint for Hamilton's Founders Theatre. Interviews with friends and associates — poets Hone Tuwhare and Bill Manhire, art critics, officials and dealers — are intercut with fascinating shots of Hotere working (including making art by photocopying or 'xerography')."

1

TAGS

197420th century artabstract artists • Ad Reinhardt • Aotearoa New Zealandart critics • art dealer • art documentary • art historian • artist • Barry Lett • Bill Manhire • Brian Shennan • David Fowler • Dunedinfine art • Founders Theatre • geometric abstraction • Gordon Brown (art historian) • Hamilton • Hone Tuwhare • Ian Wedde • Jack Body • John Scott • Land Wars • Landfall (literary journal) • Lynton Diggle • MaorimuralNew Zealand artistNew Zealand on ScreenNZ Film ArchiveNZ On Screenpainting • photocopying • Port ChalmersRalph Hotere • Rodney Kirk-Smith • Roger Collins • Sam Pillsbury • spray painting • Te Aupouri • Te Rarawa • visual artist • xerography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 AUGUST 2012

O Tamaiti: young boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings

"Sima Urale's debut short film, beautifully realised in black and white, tells the story of a young Samoan boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings. As his parents struggle in their new country, he is overwhelmed by the responsibility. When faced with his grief, the adults fail to recognise his pain. Poignant attention to details that convey a child's perspective (eg. the movement of a spacies game and shopping trolley are intercut) saw O Tamaiti win awards at film festivals around the globe, including the prestigious Silver Lion at Venice."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig. 1 Dir. Sima Urale, 15mins, NZ, 1996, black & white, 1.1:66

1

TAGS

1996Aotearoa New Zealandarcade gameattention to detailAustralasiababyblack and whitechildrenchilds perspectivechurch • Coke machine • coming of age • cot death • deathdebutfamily • female filmmaker • hospitalimmigrant • Kara Paewai • kiwi short films • new baby • New Zealand • New Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • O Tamaiti • PacificPacific IslanderPolynesianpregnancySamoan • sensitive portrayal • shopping trolley • short filmsiblings • Sima Urale • socialsoundSpace InvadersspaciesThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Filmyoung boy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 AUGUST 2012

Stroke: an individual struggles against a dehumanised mass

"Christine Jeffs made her directing debut with this lush, high end (35mm film, Dolby sound) short film. Dorothy (Fiona Samuel), a lone swimmer, luxuriates in tranquil bliss at a deserted pool – only to have her solitude rudely interrupted by a squad of swimmers. A wordless, strikingly choreographed conflict ensues as Dorothy attempts to assert herself against the dehumanised aggression of the swimmers. Stroke was invited to international festivals including Cannes and Sundance; and Jeffs went on to direct feature films Rain and Sunshine Cleaning."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Christine Jeffs (1994), "Stroke" (short film excerpt) Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 8 minutes.

1

TAGS

199435mmAotearoa New Zealand • assertiveness • Australasia • choreographed conflict • choreographies for camerachoreographychoreography of conflict • Christine Jeffs • dehumanisation • dehumanised aggression • Fiona Samuel • kiwi shortkiwi short filmskiwi shortsmoving imageNew Zealand on ScreenNZ On Screennz short film • Robin Laing • short filmsportswimmerswimmingThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Film • tranquillity • wordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2012

Neoliberal whizz-kid: Aotearoa New Zealand PM John Key in 1987

"A 1987 video has been unearthed featuring a 25–year–old squash–playing, accountancy graduate John Key. The bright–eyed Mr Key features in an early Close–Up story called Big Dealers. The 'portrait of 80s job du jour: foreign exchange dealer', shows the now Prime Minister in 'the pit' (trading room) as a senior forex dealer. 'Forex dealing is a work hard, play hard world with an image of rich brats who wreck restaurants but always somewhere else,' says the reporter. 'I am not denying that, that has happened and I guess that will happen again in the future but I personally perform in that way,' Mr Key responded."

(Deanna Harris, 02 Sep 2010, MediaWorks TV)

1

TAGS

1980s1987 • 3 News • accountancy graduate • Aotearoa New Zealand • Big Dealers (television) • bright-eyed • businesscapital accumulationcapitalismChristchurch • Close-Up (television) • economyfinance • finance industry • financial dealingfinancial flowsfinancial gainfinancial innovationfinancial markets • financial risk • financial transactionsfinancing • foreign exchange • foreign exchange dealer • foreign exchange dealers • forex dealer • forex dealing • free market economyglobal capital flowsglobal financial marketJohn Keylifestyle • MediaWorks TV • money making • neoliberalismNew Zealand on Screen • NZ News • personal financial gain • Prime Ministerprofitrich bratriskrisk-takingsocial conservatism • squash-playing • stock marketstocks • trading room • TV3unit of capital accumulation • whizz-kid • winning • young upwardly-mobile professional • young urban professional • yuppie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2011

Mana Waka: feature-length documentary showing the re-building of the seven wakataua/war canoes of the Great Maori Fleet

"Mana Waka, working title Canoe, is a feature–length documentary made to launch New Zealand's 1990 centennial celebrations. The documentary has a fascinating history. Princess Te Puea Herangi of the Turangawaewae Marae, Ngauruawahia, was a great Maori leader committed to work that would uphold, and be used for the benefit of, the Maori people. During the late 1930s she conceived the idea of celebrating the 1940 centennial of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by re–building the seven wakataua/war canoes of the Great Fleet, According to legend these canoes had journeyed from Hawaiki to Aotearoa some 25 generations previously. Princess Te Puea asked stills photographer R.G.H. (Jim) Manley, who had not previously made a film, to film the re–building, and he did so over a period of three years. Up north in the Puketi Forest, a great kauri tree was felled for the building of the Nga–toki–matawhaorua canoe which is now housed at Waitangi. Two totara trees from the Oruanui Forest provided the timber for the canoes that were carved and built at Turangawaewae."

(Helen Martin, 8 July 2011, Onfilm Magazine)

Fig.1 Still from "Mana Waka": NZ 1990 Documentary prod co Nga Kaitiaki o Te Puea Estate and the Turangawaewae Marae Trust dir Merata Mita camera R.G.H. Manly (filmed 1937 – 1940) ed Annie Collins kai korero/narrator Tukuroirangi Morgan film preservation Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga The New Zealand Film Commission, Ngā Kaitiaki Ō Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua The New Zealand Film Archive, NFU Laboratory, NFU Sound finecut Nga Kaitiaki o Te Marae o Turangawaewae sound Merata Mita, David Madigan, Chris Verberg, Mike Hedges, Annie Collins. 85 minutes.

1

TAGS

1930s193719401990Annie CollinsAotearoa New Zealandcanoecarvingcentennialcraftcultural heritagedocumentaryfeature-length documentaryfilm • Great Fleet • Hawaiki • heritageIndigenous • Jim Manley • kauri • Mana Waka (film) • MaoriMaori peopleMerata MitaNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • Nga Kaitiaki O Nga Taonga Whitiahua The New Zealand Film Archive • Ngauruawahia • NZ Film Archive • Oruanui Forest • photographerpreservation • Princess Te Puea Herangi • Puketi Forest • Te Tiriti o Waitangi • Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga The New Zealand Film Commission • totara • Treaty of Waitangi • Tukuroirangi Morgan • Turangawaewae Marae Trust • Waikato • wakataua • war canoes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.