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Which clippings match 'Existentialism' keyword pg.1 of 3
12 JUNE 2015

Belief in the here and now: a Humanist perspective

Written & produced by the British Humanist Association, and narrated by Stephen Fry. Animated by Hyebin Lee. Thank you to Alom Shaha, Craig Duncan, Andrew Copson, and Sara Passmore That's Humanism logo design by Nick Cousin

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2D animationafterlifeanimated short filmbelief systemsbeliefs • biological death • British Humanist Association • consciousnesscontemplating mortalitydeathdisembodimentdyingend of life • eternal life • existentialismfaith • faith in nature • fulfilmentheaven • here and now • human consciousnesshumanism • Hyebin Lee • life • making the most of life • material realitymaterial worldmortalitynothingnessobjective realityrationalist perspectiverealm of existence • reincarnation • spiritualityStephen Fry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MARCH 2014

The Magic Canvas (1948): An animated quest for freedom

"After the war years the studio made this beautifully fluid experiment in animation, a remarkable achievement before computers were born. The film shows how the union of the material and spiritual natures of man can lead to fulfilment. John Halas with the Hungarian designer Peter Foldes produced and directed Magic Canvas with an original score by Matyas Sieber, a student of Bella Bartok."

Year: 1948; Length: 10 mins; Production: John Halas, Joy Batchelor; Direction: John Halas; Script: John Halas; Design: John Halas, Peter Foldes; Animation: Wally Crook; Music: Matyas Sieber.

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19482D animation • abstract score • animation • associative images • balletbirdBritish animationcel animationdanceenvironment as antagonistescapeexistential insightexistentialismfreedomfulfilmentHalas and Batchelorhand-painted stop motion animationimprisonmentJohn HalasJoy Batchelor • Matyas Sieber • Peter Foldes • separation • struggling to be free • surrealist style • The Magic Canvas (1948) • traditional animationtrapped • visual association • visual metaphor • Wally Crook • war years

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JANUARY 2012

The Empathic Civilisation: our (collective) empathetic consciousness

"Never has the world seemed so completely united–in the form of communication, commerce, and culture–and so savagely torn apart–in the form of war, financial meltdown, global warming, and even the migration of diseases. ...

The human–made environment is rapidly morphing into a global space, yet our existing modes of consciousness are structured for earlier eras of history, which are just as quickly fading away. Humanity, Rifkin argues, finds itself on the cusp of its greatest experiment to date: refashioning human consciousness so that human beings can mutually live and flourish in the new globalizing society…

As the forces of globalization accelerate, deepen, and become ever more complex, the older faith–based and rational forms of consciousness are likely to become stressed, and even dangerous, as they attempt to navigate a world increasingly beyond their reach and control. Indeed, the emergence of this empathetic consciousness has implications for the future that will likely be as profound and far–reaching as when Enlightenment philosophers upended faith–based consciousness with the canon of reason."

(Jeremy Rifkin)

[A noble effort to explain the consequences of post–traditional society framed through a biological deterministic lens.]

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biological determinism • blood-ties • civilisationcollective consciousness • collective resources • earlier eras • empathetic consciousness • empathic sociability • empathy • emphatic development • European Enlightenmentevolutionary determinism • evolutionary psychology • evolutionary theoryexistentialismfaith • faith-based consciousness • globalisationglobalising society • globalising world • glocalhuman beingshuman consciousnesshuman narrative • human race • human-made environment • humanity • Jeremy Rifkin • man made • modes of consciousness • narcissismpost-traditionalpost-traditional society • rational forms of consciousness • reductionismreductionist perspectiveRSA Animateselfhoodsocialisationthe past • think globally and act locally

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2011

What Does It Mean To Become A Master?

"In the 1960's and 70's, the advent of computers not only reinforced this notion of man as a rational animal, it also led many people to predict that we would soon have machines that could think and act just like human beings. In 1972, however, Hubert Dreyfus's seminal and controversial book What Computers Can't Do anticipated the failure of what came to be known as 'artificial intelligence'.

In the book, Dreyfus explains that human beings are not at all like computers. We do not apply abstract, context–free rules to compute how to act when we engage in skilled behavior. Instead, Dreyfus argued, the fundamental thing about humans is that we are embodied beings living in a shared world of social practices and equipment. In the end, it is our skillful mastery and our shared practices that not only distinguish us from machines but allow us to assume meaningful identities."

(Tao Ruspoli, 2010)

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19722010 • a sense of wonder • a world full of meaning • abstract thoughtAlbert Borgmannartificial intelligence • Being in the World (film) • Charles Taylor • context-free rules • craftsmanshipcreative skills • embodied beings • exemplary figures • existential phenomenologists • existential philosophers • existentialism • flamenco master • godsheroes • Hiroshi Sakaguchi • Hubert Dreyfushuman being • Iain Thomson • jazz master • John Haugeland • Leah Chase • Lindsay Benner • living in a shared worldmachines • man as a rational animal • Manuel Molina • Mark Wrathall • Martin Heidegger • master carpenter • master chef • master juggler • masters • masterymeaning • meaningful identities • modern day masters • musical genius • rational animal • sacred • saints • Sean Kelly • shared practices • sinners • skilful masteryskillskilled behaviourskillful copingsocial practicessports stars • Tao Ruspoli • Taylor Carman • thinking machines • unique situation • What Computers Can't Do

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2011

American Conservatory Theater's No Exit: blurs the lines between film and theatre

"Fresh from sold–out performances across Canada, Jean–Paul Sartre's redefined classic makes its U.S. debut at A.C.T. A mysterious valet ushers three people into a shabby hotel room, and they soon discover that hell isn't fire and brimstone at all –it's other people. Sartre's existential classic, skillfully reimagined through the perspective of a series of hidden cameras, turns the stage into a cinema, and the audience into voyeurs, as a thrillingly staged 'live film' takes place before your eyes. A.C.T. continues its tradition of welcoming the work of innovative international artists to the Bay Area with this riveting multimedia event."

(American Conservatory Theater, 2011)

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2011 • American Conservatory Theater • audience • Bay Area • Canadacreative practiceexistentialexistentialismexperimental theatrehell • hidden cameras • hotel room • Jean-Paul Sartre • live film • living picturesmedia literacymultidisciplinarymultimedia • multimedia event • No Exit (1944)proscenium archradical stagingreimaginedstagesurveillancetheatre • valet • visual literacy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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