Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Angel' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

1
2
3

TAGS

2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • experience design • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train station • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2010

Drawing study: Head of a Girl

"The eminent art expert Bernhard Berenson called this sheet 'the most beautiful drawing in the world.' It is thought to be a study for the angel in the Virgin of the Rocks in the Musée du Louvre, Paris."

(Web Gallery of Art)

Fig.1 Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1483. Silverpoint and white highlights on prepared paper, 181 x 159 mm, Biblioteca Reale, Turin.

1

TAGS

1483 • angelartistic practice • Bernhard Berenson • conceptualisationcreative practicedesign processdrawingdrawing studyfine art • Head of a Girl • Leonardo da Vinci • Musee du Louvre • polymathsketchsketchbook • Virgin of the Rocks • visual artsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2005

Halo: an immersive audiovisual experience

"The work of the Australian–born artist Simon Biggs marries old with new, bringing a sophisticated technological gloss to themes and motifs drawn from classical art and mythology.

In 'Halo', Biggs bought his trademark digital tableaux to atmospheric and historic architectural spaces. An interactive installation, 'Halo' drew upon a frame of reference that extended from Baroque and Renaissance painting to the visionary writings of William Blake. Produced in collaboration with composer Stuart Jones and choreographer Sarah Rubidge, 'Halo' was staged at the gallery of Harewood House near Leeds and then expanded to more spectacular proportions inside the converted church of Fabrica in Brighton.

'Halo' was curated and produced by Film and Video Umbrella. Supported by the National Lottery through the Arts Council of England. Exhibition equipment sponsored by Saville Audio Visual."

(Film and Video Umbrella)

1

Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.