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Which clippings match 'Train Station' keyword pg.1 of 3
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual

"In the 1960s, the New York subways were a mess, sign–wise. Station names and metro lines were spelled out in a hodgepodge of sizes, shapes, and styles. The original mosaic tiles had been joined by cut stone and terracotta–all of which clashed with newer enamel signs. They were not only inconsistent in terms of style but also in where they were placed, so straphangers didn't know where to look for directions on how to get from point A to point B.

In 1970, following the merger of the IND and BMT lines, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda, designers at the firm Unimark, to put an end to the typographic chaos. The system they devised still informs signs made today and is painstakingly outlined in a 174–page manual"

(Belinda Lanks, 15 September 2014, Businessweek)

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TAGS

1960s1970Bob Noorda • Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit • Christopher Bonanos • clashing design • communication designdestination identificationdirectional information • directions • fastidious detail • graphic communicationgraphic designer • Hamish Smyth • Helvetica • hodgepodge • inconsistencies • Independent Subway System (IND) • information design • instruction manual • International Typographic Style • Jesse Reed • Kickstarter • letter combination • manualMassimo Vignelli • merger • metro line • metro station • Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA • Michael Bierutmodern design • modernist graphics • New York City • New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual • New York subway • Niko Skourtis • official font • organisation and communicationPentagram Designrationalisation • reissue • sans-serif typefacesignagesignage designsigns • spacing • spatial orientation • standards manual • straphanger • style guidesubwaysymbol system • system signage • train station • typographic chaos • typography • Unimark • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2014

Blowing in the Wind: metro station screen reacts to train arrival

"On behalf of Åkestam Holst and Apotek Hjärtat we modified one of Clear Channel's Play screens on Odenplans subway platform. The mission was to capture the effect of the turbulence from the train and make it look like the models hair on the screen was caught by the breeze.

To do this we needed to build a device that could be calibrated to sense the arrival of the train and not react to passing passengers. Using an ultra sonic sensor, connected to a Raspberry Pi and a local network socket, we connected our device to the screens computer where the film could be activated by the passing trains.

Stopp managed the shooting and post production of all video material used for the customized screen at Odenplan and all other Play screens around the subway.

A simple idea, well executed, that let us use existing technology in a new way. The installation was appreciated by the head of Clear Channel and as a result Apotek Hjärtat was offered to keep it live for five additional days, as a way for them to show the opportunities their screens can offer."

(STOPP/STHLM)

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TAGS

2014adadvertising in public spacesadvertising screens • Akestam Holst • apolosophy • Apotek • Apotek Hjartat • arriving train • breeze • caught by the breeze • Clear Channel • Clear Channel Play • digital billboardsdigital screenshair • hair product • hair tousled by the wind • interactive animations • interactive subway ad • local network socket • metro station • moving train • Odenplan • Odenplan metro station • passing trains • pharmacyrail advertisingrailway advertisingrailway stationRaspberry PiStockholm • STOPP (integrated production company) • subwaySwedentrain arrivaltrain stationturbulence • ultra sonic sensor • ultrasonic sensor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2014

Waterloo Motion: 40x3m, 6mm pixel high-definition screen spanning length of Waterloo station concourse

"Automotive giant Audi took a turn into the sign industry recently after serving as the launch partner of Waterloo Motion, the UK's largest indoor advertising screen that is located in London's Waterloo railway station"

(Rob Fletcher, 27 Feb 2014, SignLink)

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TAGS

#AudiWaterloo • 2014 • ABC1 • advertisingadvertising in public spacesadvertising screensAudi • Audi Dashboard • BBH London • brand message • branded content • concourse • dashboarddigital billboardsdigital screensdigital signagedwell time • Grand Visual • high-definition screen • indoor advertising • JCDecaux • Kristian Dean • London • London Waterloo • Network Rail • on-screen conversations • One day in the life of Waterloo • rail advertisingrailway advertisingrailway station • real-time information • real-time visualisation • Spencer Berwin • train stationUK • Waterloo Motion • Waterloo station

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JANUARY 2014

Observation at high speed: slit-scan photography of passengers waiting at Shinjuku, Alexanderplatz and 42 Street stations

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JANUARY 2014

Moscow metro launches 'Squat to ride' Sochi promotion

"As part of the zealous promotion for Russia's upcoming Sochi Olympics spectacular, the Moscow metro is offering an alternative to its ticket machines and their queues. It is combining a keep–fit theme and making an attractive offer to commuters; get some gain from the pain and ride the train for free."

(Euronews, 08 November 2013)

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TAGS

2013advertising in public spacesawareness campaignawareness raisingcommutercreative advertising • Euronews • exercise • exercise machinehealth awareness • health promotion • keep-fit • Maria Kiseleva • metro • Moscow • Moscow Metro • obesityOlympic GamesOlympic Games 2014promotionpublic healthpublic spaceRussia • Russian Olympic Committee • Sochi 2014 Olympic • Sochi Olympics • sport • squat to ride • squats • ticket • ticket machine • ticket purchasingtrain station • train travel • Vystavochnaya station

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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