Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Colour Scheme' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 NOVEMBER 2016

The vaporwave aesthetic and the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory

"Vaporwave isn’t just something you listen to either, it’s something you experience, and experiences include visuals. Vaporwave visual art, simply referred to as 'aesthetics,' is varied but tends to honor some core tenets. If you’re looking at something pink and teal with a marble classical bust and a glitchy Windows 95 logo, you’re probably looking at a vaporwave aesthetic. If you’re watching a YouTube video with a title written in a weirdly soothing stretched out font, you’re probably watching a vaporwave aesthetic.

If you haven’t guessed by now, vaporwave is a bit of a joke, or more accurately, an internet meme. Vaporwave’s trippy immediate artistic ancestor 'seapunk' was a running inside joke on Tumblr during 2011 about fashion and art and music inspired by the ocean. The look and sound of a psychedelic club run by a hipster Ariel from The Little Mermaid is a pretty accurate summation. Neon seapunk imagery even found its way into Rihanna’s 2012 Saturday Night Live performance, confounding many viewers with its colorful and stylish but garish, cheap, and seemingly unprofessional grainy green screen look. The exact difference between seapunk and vaporwave is blurry, but as far as I understand vaporwave trades the aquatic focus for a fascination with the emptiness of aging and/or amateur glossy commercialism. It’s the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory."

(Jordan Minor, 03 June 2016)

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1980s retro styleamateur cultural production • amateur glossy commercialism • anti-corporate aesthetic • appropriationcheesy • classical bust • colour schemecolourfulcomputer graphicsconsumption spectacle • cultural aesthetic • digital texts • emptiness • fan art • Floral Shoppe (2011) • inside joke • internet art form • internet cultureInternet memeirony • Japanese funk • Macintosh Plus (musical alias) • manipulating samples • manufactured nostalgia • marble • memenetworked productionnew forms of expression • new sincerity • nostalgic styleoceanparticipatory mediapinkpsychedelic imageryreappropriationremix cultureretro cheesinessretro computer graphics • runaway consumerism • seapunk • Sega Genesis • Simpsonwave • Simpsonwave aesthetic • slow jams • stretched out font • teal • tech-fueled nostalgic loop • tech-savvy • The Little Mermaid • The Simpsons (television) • trippy • Tumblrvaporware • vaporwave • vaporwave aesthetic • vaporwave visual art • Vektroid (electronic musician) • video gamesvisual aestheticsWindows 95

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2014

Eduardo Paolozzi: Turkische Musik, 1974

"Eduardo Paolozzi's work often, as in the Türkische Musik series, may be printed in different color schemes or on different papers. All these elements combine to suggest that the image is often discovered in the act of creating it; the artist's role is integrally balanced between active calculation and chance. No longer confined to a single plan, the artist–printmaker and his work signify an exciting new order of print– making, one in which technological expertise becomes a useful vehicle for personal expression."

(Georgette Lee, 1986)

Precision of Image: Technology in Printed Art : 20 April – 7 September, 1986, The Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery at Syracuse University in Syracuse.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JULY 2010

London Underground Victoria Line ceramic tiles

The Victoria Line that opened between 1968 and 1971 "provided the opportunity to produce a new and consistent look across the whole line, from the trains themselves to the stations and platforms. All aspects of design were overseen by Misha Black, the Design Consultant for London Transport (1964–1968), who previously had a similar role with British Rail. He employed the talents of the The Design Research Unit (DRU) – a collective of designers, artists and architects who designed all aspects of the VIctoria Line.

Each platform was designed with a very muted colour scheme, described by some of the press at the time as the 'late lavatorial style' (1, P58). The tiled designs in each seat recess provided much needed colour and decoration, and gave each stop its own visual identity. The results were a mixture of direct inspiration from the station name and references to historical details of the local area."

(Ian Moore, Design Assembly, 3 May 2010)

Fig.1 Stockwell by Abram Games – a semi–abstract swan, representing the nearby pub of the same name.

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19681969197120th century • Abram Games • blocks of colourBritish Rail • Brixton • ceramic tileceramicscolourcolour schemecreative practicedecorationdesigndesign historyDesign Research UnitDRUgeometric designshistorical detailhistoryidentitylocalLondon TransportLondon Underground • Misha Black • motif • name • rail • station platform • Stockwell • train stationTube (transport)tube stationUKundergroundunderground line • VIctoria Line • visual communicationvisual depictionvisual designvisual identityvisual motif • Walthamstow Central • Warren Street

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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