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01 APRIL 2014

Kawehi lays down The Way You Make Me Feel layer by layer

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beat • beatbox • beatbox artist • beatbox music • bedroom • Boss FS6 Dual Footswitch • Boss RC-300 Loop Station • digital creativitydrum beat • effects pedal • effects unit • FX pedal • generated loopsHawaiianHonolulu • Kawehi • layered technique • loopingloopsmaking musicMichael Jacksonmulti-trackmusic covermusic loopsmusical interpretationmusiciannew approachespattern • Paul Wight • performerplaying music • realtime recording • revelationreverse-engineerrhythmsamplingsequencersingersound performance • The Way You Make Me Feel (song) • tracksvirtual band • vocal effects • voiceswomen in music

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2013

Isadora: an interactive media presentation tool for artists

"Isadora is the award winning, interactive media presentation tool that allows you to follow your artistic impulse. Whether you are an artist, designer, performer, or VJ, you can quickly and easily harness the limitless potential of digital media and real–time interactivity with Isadora. ...

Created by composer and media–artist, Mark Coniglio, Isadora was initially developed to realize the performances of Troika Ranch, the pioneering media intensive dance company he co–founded. Isadora reflects over 20 years of practical experience with real–time live performance and media interactivity."

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analogue correspondenceauthoring environmentcreative practicedance • dance company • dance performancegesture • graphic programming environment • IDEinteractive mediainteractive performanceIsadoralive media artlive performance • Mark Coniglio • media artist • media interactivity • motion dataOpen Sound Controlperformance artistperformerpresentation toolprogramming environmentreal-time graphicsreal-time interactivity • real-time manipulation • real-time visualisationsoftware • Troika Ranch • TroikaTronix • VJVJ software

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2013

The arts and sciences are drawn more closely together by technology

"A passion for bringing together expertise in the arts, computing and technology is inspiring the University of Greenwich's new Professor of Digital Creativity.

Gregory Sporton, who joins in January [2013] from Birmingham City University, has spent much of his academic career researching the impact of new technology on the visual and performing arts. He is a former professional dancer and has also researched the history of ballet in Soviet times.

He is excited about introducing a new and original focus on the arts to Greenwich. 'I aim to gather together the expertise we have in so many disciplines, such as creative arts, computing, visualisation and all the rest, and make something new and interesting,' Professor Sporton says.

'The arts and sciences are drawn more closely together by technology: there is less differentiation than people think, and at Greenwich I want to build a research environment to explore that."

(University of Greenwich News, 17 December 2012)

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2017artsarts and sciences • ballerina • ballet • Birmingham City University • Birmingham Institute of Art and Designbodycomputingcreative artsdancerdigital creativityGreenwich • Gregory Sporton • impact of new technology • institutional strategic agenda • MotivePro Suit • performerperforming artsposture • Professor of Digital Creativity • research agenda • research environmenttraining • University of Greenwich • visual artsvisualisationVisualisation Research Unit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

onformative a studio for generative design: unnamed soundsculpture

"The basic idea of the project is built upon the consideration of creating a moving sound sculpture from the recorded motion data of a real person. For our work we asked a Laura Keil, a berlin based dancer to interpret a musical piece – Kreukeltape by Machinenfabriek – as closely as possible with the movement of her own body. She was recorded by three depth cameras (Kinect), in which the intersection of the images was later put together to a three–dimensional volume (3d point cloud), doing so we were able to use the collected data throughout the further process.

The three–dimensional image allowed us a completely free handling of the digital camera, without limitations of the perspective. The camera also reacts to the sound and supports the physical imitation of the musical piece by the performer. She moves to a noise field, where a simple modification of the random seed can consistently create new versions of the video, each offering a different composition of the recorded performance. The multi–dimensionality of the sound sculpture is already contained in every movement of the dancer, as the camera footage allows any imaginable perspective.

Similar to painting, a single point appears to be still very abstract, but the more points are connected to each other, the more complex and concrete the image seems. The more perfect and complex the 'alternative worlds' we project and the closer together their point elements, the more tangible they become. A digital body, consisting of 22 000 points, thus seems so real that it comes to life again.

Using 3 different microsoft kinect cameras the movement of the dancer was recorded into those 3d pointclouds that were synced and exported as one large dataset as Krakatoa particle files to be loaded into 3ds max for further rendering and creation of the 3d scene including the camera movement that is controlled by the audio as well."

(Cedric Kiefer and Julia Laub, onformative a studio for generative design)

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2012 • 3D point cloud • 3D pointclouds • 3D scene • 3ds Maxanalogue correspondenceanimationaudio controlledBerlinbodycamera footage • Cedric Kiefer • concrete image • connected points • creative practicedancedancer • Daniel Franke • depth cameras • design projectdesign studio • digital body • generative designgesture • Julia Laub • KinectKrakatoa (software) • Kreukeltape • large dataset • Laura Keil • Machinenfabriek • Microsoft Kinectmicrosoft kinect camera • modification of the random seed • motion datamovement • moving sound sculpture • multi-dimensionality • multiple perspectives • noise field • onformative • performerpersonal workperspective • physical imitation • Processing (software) • random seed • recorded motion data • recorded performance • sound sculpturespatial • spatial volume • studio for generative design • three-dimensional image • three-dimensional volume • transposing materials • unnamed soundsculpture • visual musicvisual spectaclevisualisationvolumetric particle rendering

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2010

There was relatively little divide between spectator and performer in the archaic theatre

"In the archaic theatre there was relatively little divide between spectator and performer, seeing and doing; people danced and spoke, then retired to a stone seat to watch others dance and declaim. By the time of Aristotle, actors and dancers had become a caste with special skills of costuming, speaking, and moving. Audiences stayed offstage, and so developed their own skills of interpretation as spectators. As critics, the audience sought to speculate then about what the stage–characters did not understand about themselves (though the chorus on stage sometimes also took on this clarifying role)."

(Richard Sennett, 2008, p.125)

Fig.1 Lysistrata Summer 2006 University of Florida

2). Sennett, R. (2008). "The Craftsman". New Haven & London, Yale University Press.

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2008actor • archaic theatre • Aristotleaudienceauthorshipboundary • chorus • Classicalcostumedance • demarcation • engagementjoinorderingparticipationperformanceperformerRichard Sennettscriptibleseeing and doingshow (spectacle)skillspectatorshipstageThe Craftsmantheatre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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