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Which clippings match 'Speech Synthesis' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 FEBRUARY 2014

Western Electric AT&T: early computer graphics

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1968AT and T • Beflicks • Bell Laboratories Flicks • Bell LabsBell Telephone Laboratoriescomputer graphicscomputer history • computer movie • Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two) • digital drawing • digital movie • digital pen • early computer-erahuman speechlight penPrelinger Archivespunch cards • random letters • robotic voice • sheet music • speakingspeechspeech synthesissynthesis machines • synthesized speech • The Incredible Machine (1968) • typewriter

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2012

Cleverbot: talk to an intelligent bot

"Cleverbot is Artificial Intelligence. Say whatever you like – songs, jokes, memes or anything, and it will respond. It learns what people say, in context, and imitates. Cleverbot is an entertainment – not made to be logical, give advice, or be useful. Many people keep talking for hours, and say it's too clever to be a bot – that it must be human. Yet it never is: it is a bot. Cleverbot is software. Maybe it even contains a little Actual Intelligence."

(Rollo Carpenter, Icogno Ltd.)

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AIappartificial intelligenceavatarawarenessbehaviourbot • Cleverbot • Cleverlips • communicationconversation • Dragon Dictate • emotion • emotional avatar • human speechhuman-computer interactionhuman-likeinteractive toyiOSiPadiPhoneiPod Touchlifelikemachine learningman machine • Nuance Communications • Nuance software • nuanced • pattern recognitionrepresentationrobot • Rollo Carpenter • simulationSirisociable robotspeakingspeechspeech recognitionspeech synthesissyntheticsynthetic-life • talk out loud • voice • voice tech

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2010

The Voder: first attempt to synthesise human speech

"The Bell Telephone Laboratory's Voder* was the first attempt to synthesise human speech by breaking it down into its component sounds and then reproducing the sound patterns electronically to create speech.

That sounds simple in theory and, in fact it was. The Voder actually produced only two basic sounds: a tone generated by a radio valve to produce the vocal sounds and a hissing noise produced by a gas discharge tube to create the sibilants. These basic sounds were passed through a set of filters and an amplifier that mixed and modulated them until what came out of the loudspeaker sounded something like this.

Unfortunately, as is often the case, what was simple in theory was extremely difficult in practice. To get the machine to actually speak required an operator to manipulate a set of keys and a foot pedal to convert the hisses and tones into vowels, consonants, stops, and inflections. And the operator needed a year's practice just to master the keys."

(David H. Szondy)

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1939audioBell LabsBell Telephone Laboratoriescomputer historydevicediscoveryfuturistic machineshuman speechindustrial designinnovationkeyboardmachinemusical instrument • New York World's Fair • Pedro • pioneeringproduct designrobot • she saw me • simulationsoundspeculative designspeech synthesistechnology • Voder • voice • voice synthesis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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