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Which clippings match 'Primary School' keyword pg.1 of 2
30 NOVEMBER 2013

Confiscation Cabinets: an exhibition of confiscated childhood objects

"Artist Guy Tarrant's display cabinets show artefacts gleaned from 150 different London primary and secondary schools over three decades. These objects include homemade games, keepsakes, cult toys, peculiar adornments, weapons and other forbidden objects which characterise the flotsam and jetsam of contemporary school children.

Since qualifying as a teacher, Guy Tarrant has investigated pupil interaction, play and resistant behaviour. The objects in the cabinets highlight mischievous and distracted behaviour played out in the controlled school setting where children spend much of their time. These confiscated items are evidence of the pupils' playful and impulsive activities and how they may reject or evade rules."

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ad-hoc • adornments • artefactsauthoritychildhood imagination • confiscated items • Confiscation Cabinets • confiscation drawer • controlcontrolled environments • cult toys • cultural significance of objectsdiscipline and punishmentdistracting attentiondistracting behaviourDIYfad • flotsam and jetsam • forbidden objects • Guy Tarrant • homemade bombs • homemade gamesimprovisation • impulsive activities • intriguing objects • keepsake • makeshiftmaterial culturemischievous behaviour • Museum of Childhood • personal cultural production • personal objects • plastic toysplayful activitiesprimary schoolpunishmentregulationresistant behaviourrulesschool children • school setting • secondary schoolsocial interactionsubversive actionssymbolic controltoy • toy guns • V and Aweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JUNE 2013

A Class Divided: Jane Elliott's daring classroom experiment

"On the day after Martin Luther King was killed, I––one of my students came into the room and said they shot a king last night, Mrs. Elliott, why'd they shoot that king? I knew the night before that it was time to deal with this in a concrete way, not just talking about it, because we had talked about racism since the first day of school. But the shooting of Martin Luther King, who had been one of our heroes of the month in February, could not just be talked about and explained away. There was no way to explain this to little third graders in Riceville, Iowa. ...

I decided at that point that it was time to try the eye color thing, which I had thought about many, many times but had never used. So the next day I introduced an eye color exercise in my classroom and split the class according to eye color. And immediately created a microcosm of society in a third–grade classroom."

(Jane Elliott, 1985, PBS)

Frontline "A Class Divided": Season 3, Episode 9, A Class Divided (26 Mar. 1985), Director: William Peters, Writers: Charlie Cobb, William Peters.

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197019841985 • A Class Divided (1985) • ABC News (USA) • attitudes • Charlie Cobb • classroom • classroom experiment • colourcultural assumptionsdiscrimination • eye colour • human experimentationhuman subjects • Iowa • Jane Elliott • lives and attitudes • Martin Luther King • PBSprejudiceprimary schoolracial discriminationracial inequalityracism • Riceville • school pupilschool students • schoolteacher • simulation studysocial responsibility • subhuman • teacherthird gradetranscript • William Peters • women in pedagogy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2013

Earth houses give pupils refuge from Heathrow noise

"Buildings originally designed for earthquake and emergency zones in Asia and Africa are now being erected in London playgrounds to shield schoolchildren from the noise of aircraft landing at Heathrow. ...

The superadobe design was an invention of the Iranian architect Nader Khalili, originally with a view to lunar settlements but first employed in a refugee crisis after the 1990–91 Gulf war, before answering the needs of west London's noise–afflicted schoolchildren. The buildings can withstand tremors with a magnitude of up to 5.7. Their domes are also immune to the damage occasionally wrought on local homes' tiled roofs by vortices from incoming jets.

The headteacher, Kathryn Harper–Quinn, estimates that when outside, teachers are rendered inaudible to pupils for 25 seconds in every 90. 'I've been very concerned about the effects of the noise on the children's learning,' she said.

In the huts, she added, 'you can still hear the planes but you can also hear your own voice'. She said that as outdoor learning was both valued by teachers and a statutory part of the curriculum, staff had developed strategies to deal with aircraft noise, including the use of whistles to alert children who could not hear when teachers were speaking.

She said it was also important that the adobe structures were a refuge for children outside lesson times. 'When kids are playing they are also developing their language skills, and in the playground again they're being interrupted.'"

(Gwyn Topham, 22 April 2013, The Guardian)

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adobe structuresaeroplaneair traffic • aircraft landing • aircraft noise • airport noise • amphitheatre • built environmentchildren • dome • environmental noise • excessive noise • flight-path • Hounslow Heath • hut • inaudible • infant school • Iranian • Julian Faulkner • Kathryn Harper-Quinn • kidslandscape architecturelanguage skills • London Heathrow Airport • Nader Khalili • noise • noise level • noise pollution • outdoor noise • outside lesson • passenger aircraftplace for childrenplaygroundprimary schoolrefuge • roar • Slough • superadobe • The GuardianUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MARCH 2013

Finland's school system accomplishes some impressive feats: so what makes Finnish students so successful?

"Students get plenty of teacher interaction: Finland and New York City have the same number of teachers. But Finland has nearly half the number of students. Standardized testing is kept to a minimum: before a New York student reaches high school, he or she will have taken 10 standardized tests. Collectively, US students take 100 million standardized tests a year. Finland's only standardized test is taken when students are 16 years old. Kids have more time to be kids: an average us 5th grader has 50 minimum of homework per day. Finnish students rarely do homework until their teens. And while us elementary students average 27 minutes of recess students in Finland get about 75 minutes a day). Finland knows good teachers are essential: teachers in Finland are all required to have a Master's degree (which is fully subsidized by the state)."

(OnlineClasses.org, 21 January 2013)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2012

UK Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum

Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum
Westminster Education Forum National Curriculum Seminar Series 2013
Timing: Morning, Wednesday, 13th February 2013
Venue: Central London

"As the Government concludes its National Curriculum review, this timely seminar focuses on the content of the new curriculum for Design and Technology (D&T) for each Key Stage, due to be introduced into schools from September 2014 – as well as the implementation challenges for schools. It will bring together key policymakers with school and college leaders, teaching unions, universities, employers and other stakeholders.

Delegates will assess the opportunities and challenges presented by D&T's designation as a 'foundation' subject, with a much less prescriptive Programme of Study, as well as the level of teaching time required to deliver the new Programme and whether it meets the needs of employers, colleges and universities.

Sessions also focus on wider issues in D&T including the quality of facilities available in both primary and secondary schools in England, the profile and CPD opportunities for D&T teachers and the role that industry can play in the delivery of D&T in schools."

(Westminster Education Forum, UK)

Fig.1 Chicago Middle School students participate in an invention school workshop led by James Dyson as the James Dyson Foundation begins its mission to encourage more American students to become future engineers and inventors, at the Sir Miles Davis Academy in Chicago, May 5, 2011 [http://momandmore.com/2011/05/james–dyson–foundation–just–launched.html].

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20132014 • Academy of Culinary Arts • Bel Reed • Bill Nicholl • CPDcurriculumcurriculum delivery • David Anderson • Department for Education • design and construction • design and technologyDesign and Technology AssociationDesign Council (UK) • DT • EBacceducation policyengineering and designEnglandEnglish Baccalaureate • foundation subject • Gina White • Government • implementation challenges • innovation and creativity • Institution of Mechanical Engineers • Isobel Pollock • IT • key stage • lateral thinking • lobbying • national curriculum • National Curriculum Seminar Series • North Baddesley Junior School • Ofsted • policy makersprimary schoolproblem-solving • programme of study • public policy • purposeful activities • Queen Elizabeths Grammar School • Richard Green • Royal Academy of Engineering • Sara Jayne Stanes • school leaders • secondary school • Susan Smith • synthetic thinkingtechnology educationUKUK GovernmentuniversitiesUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Leeds • WEET • WEETF • WeF • Westminster Education Forum • Westminster Forum Projects • WFNF • WFP • WHF • Whitehall • WLPF • WMF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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