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Which clippings match 'Sensory Phenomena' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 OCTOBER 2015

David Cross: A Question of Trust (visceral and embodied experience)

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2015actions have consequencesaesthetic spectacleaffect theory • anecdote • anthropomorphismAustralian artistclaustrophobic spaces • concepts of affect • David Cross • Deakin Universitydisarmamentembodimentfeel thingshandlehold mehuman bodyhyper-sensualityinflatableinstallation sculptureintimate transaction • non visual art • phobia • playful spacepropinquitypublic artscopophiliasense of touch • sensory modalities • sensory phenomenashow (spectacle)social exchangespatial intimacytactile experienceTED Talks • TEDxDeakinUniversity • touch metrust • unguarded experience • visceral experiencevisceral journeyvisceral theorywe experience the world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JUNE 2014

Calm Technology: designs which require only peripheral attention

"The most potentially interesting, challenging, and profound change implied by the ubiquitous computing era is a focus on calm. If computers are everywhere they better stay out of the way, and that means designing them so that the people being shared by the computers remain serene and in control. Calmness is a new challenge that UC brings to computing. When computers are used behind closed doors by experts, calmness is relevant to only a few. Computers for personal use have focused on the excitement of interaction. But when computers are all around, so that we want to compute while doing something else and have more time to be more fully human, we must radically rethink the goals, context and technology of the computer and all the other technology crowding into our lives. Calmness is a fundamental challenge for all technological design of the next fifty years. The rest of this paper opens a dialogue about the design of calm technology. ...

We use 'periphery' to name what we are attuned to without attending to explicitly. Ordinarily when driving our attention is centered on the road, the radio, our passenger, but not the noise of the engine. But an unusual noise is noticed immediately, showing that we were attuned to the noise in the periphery, and could come quickly to attend to it.

It should be clear that what we mean by the periphery is anything but on the fringe or unimportant. What is in the periphery at one moment may in the next moment come to be at the center of our attention and so be crucial. The same physical form may even have elements in both the center and periphery. The ink that communicates the central words of a text also peripherally clues us into the genre of the text though choice of font and layout.

A calm technology will move easily from the periphery of our attention, to the center, and back. This is fundamentally encalming, for two reasons.

First, by placing things in the periphery we are able to attune to many more things than we could if everything had to be at the center. Things in the periphery are attuned to by the large portion of our brains devoted to peripheral (sensory) processing. Thus the periphery is informing without overburdening.

Second, by recentering something formerly in the periphery we take control of it. Peripherally we may become aware that something is not quite right, as when awkward sentences leave a reader tired and discomforted without knowing why. By moving sentence construction from periphery to center we are empowered to act, either by finding better literature or accepting the source of the unease and continuing. Without centering the periphery might be a source of frantic following of fashion; with centering the periphery is a fundamental enabler of calm through increased awareness and power.

Not all technology need be calm. A calm videogame would get little use; the point is to be excited. But too much design focuses on the object itself and its surface features without regard for context. We must learn to design for the periphery so that we can most fully command technology without being dominated by it.

Our notion of technology in the periphery is related to the notion of affordances, due to Gibson and applied to technology by Gaver and Norman. An affordance is a relationship between an object in the world and the intentions, perceptions, and capabilities of a person. The side of a door that only pushes out affords this action by offering a flat pushplate. The idea of affordance, powerful as it is, tends to describe the surface of a design. For us the term 'affordance ' does not reach far enough into the periphery where a design must be attuned to but not attended to."

(Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown, 1997)

"The Coming Age of Calm Technology," Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown, In Beyond Calculation: The Next Fifty Years of Computing, Peter J. Denning and Robert M. Metcalfe, New York, Springer–Verlag 1997.

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1997affordancesambient awarenessaround usattentionattunementbecoming invisible • blend into the background • calm • calm technologycalmness • distributed computing • Donald Norman • encalm • encalming technology • engaged interaction • everyday thingsexcitement • explicitly • human computer interactioninteraction designJames GibsonJohn Seely Brown • Mark Weiser • peripheral attention • periphery • sensory phenomena • sensory processing • technological change • technological design • technology affordancesubiquitous computing • William Gaver • Xerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2014

Project Tango: mobile devices with a human-scale understanding of space and motion

"As we walk through our daily lives, we use visual cues to navigate and understand the world around us. We observe the size and shape of objects and rooms, and we learn their position and layout almost effortlessly over time. This awareness of space and motion is fundamental to the way we interact with our environment and each other. We are physical beings that live in a 3D world. Yet, our mobile devices assume that physical world ends at the boundaries of the screen."

(Johnny Lee, Google Advanced Technology and Projects group)

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applied research • auditory cues • game space • gamifying • geographic data • geospatial analysis • Google Advanced Technology and Projects group (ATAP)Google Inc • hide and seek • human scale • human-scale • human-scale understanding • Johnny Lee • mobile devicesmotion • physical beings • physical space • place and route • Project Tango • Project Tango (Google) • research labroboticssensory phenomenaspace • space and motion • spatial analysis • spatial awareness • spatial contextual awareness • spatial environments • spatial location • spatial orientationspatial perceptionspatial relationshipsvisceral experiencevisceral journey

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
29 JUNE 2010

Synesthesia as one of the effects achieved by hypermedia

"Synesthesia is a central conception in Marshall McLuhan's exploration of the relationship between media, culture, and the human sensorium. Jay David Bolter claims synesthesia as one of the effects achieved by hypermedia. However, McLuhan's notion of synesthesia as the simultaneous interplay of the senses in a ratio fostered by the particular medium or media involved is missing in the theoretics of hypermedia, which relegates all sensory phenomena to visual terms and overlooks the interplay between orality and literacy. Research into synesthesia in art, culture, language, and cognition supports McLuhan's conception of it as the normal process by which the brain reaches a new equilibrium when one of its functions is outered in a technology. While hypermedia thankfully falls short of mimicking natural synesthesia, interactive multimedia and virtual reality systems attempt to provide a false synesthesia that threatens the role of art and culture in achieving sensory balance."

(James C. Morrison, 2000)

Morrison, J. C. (2000). Hypermedia and Synesthesia. Media Ecology Association. 1.

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2000analogue correspondencecommunication • cool media • cool mediumculturedigital cultureequilibrium • hot media • human sensorium • hypermediainteractive multimedia • interplay • interplay of the senses • Jay David BolterMarshall McLuhanmedia • Media Ecology Association • multimedianew media • orality • representationsensessensory phenomenasimultaneoussynaesthesiavirtual realityvisual communication • visual terms • visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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