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Which clippings match 'Material Practices' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2015

Lubna Chowdhary transforms spaces using colour

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aesthetic qualitiesBritish artist • ceramic elements • ceramic tile • ceramic works • ceramicist • ceramicscolourcolourwayscraftcraftsmanshipdecorative artsdesign consultancyfemale artistgeometric abstractiongeometryglaze • glaze firing • hand-blended colours • hand-painted • handcrafted ceramic works • handcrafted works • handcrafting • individually crafted works • interior decorationinterior design • Lubna Chowdhary • material practicesmodularity • ready-made elements • traditional craftsmanship • truth to materialsvisual abstraction • visual geometry • visual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 DECEMBER 2014

The beautiful decorative patterns of faux tribal masks

"The young Dutch designer starts each of his creations on the basis of a material experiment. This enables him to discover production techniques and aesthetic developments. The result lies within unusual and attractive patterns, colours and structures. ... His love for materials has given birth to a passion for textiles that have a strong impact on his creations and pushed him to imagine a series of bizarre masks, in 2010; masks that are to Matisse, 'a characteristic sign of our essence'."

(The Red List)

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2010abstract forms • aesthetic developments • aesthetic objectsanimal resemblances • animal-mask • Bertjan Pot • carpetcolour • colour combinations • colourful designs • costume designcraft and materialscraftingdecorative artsdecorative sewingdesign craftDutch designfabric • faux tribal art • geometric designs • geometric patterns • handicraft • human face • maskmask-making • material experiment • material practicesmaterials investigationnaive stylepastiche • production technique • rope • rope masks • sewing and craft • sewn together • stylised formstextile artstextile design • The Red List • vibrant colourvisual patternzoomorphism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 APRIL 2014

State of Design: How Design Education Must Change

"But design faces an uncertain future. The traditional design fields create artifacts. But new societal challenges, cultural values, and technological opportunities require new skills. Design today is more human–centered and more social, more rooted in technology and science than ever before. Moreover, there is need for services and processes that do not require the great craft skills that are the primary outcome of a design education.

Although design can sometimes bring creative insight to new problems, this ability is more of an art than a science, limited to a few especially talented individuals and design firms. In order to expand beyond chance successes, design needs better tools and methods, more theory, more analytical techniques, and more understanding of how art and science, technology and people, theory and practice can commingle effectively and productively. ...

Design is still mainly taught as a craft. There are remarkably few fundamental principles, almost no science. If design is to live up to its promise it must create new, enduring curricula for design education that merge science and technology, art and business, and indeed, all the knowledge of the university. Design is an all–encompassing field that integrates together business and engineering, the social sciences and the arts. We see a tremendous opportunity for students that learn design in this integrated way. ...

For design to succeed, grow, achieve its potential, and train future leaders, we envision a new curriculum. In our vision, these new programs combine learning the art and craft of beautiful, pleasurable well–crafted design with substantive courses in the social and biological sciences, in technology, mathematics and statistics, and in the understanding of experimental methods and rigorous reasoning. Programming and mechatronics are essential skills in today's product world. Not only will this training make for better practitioners, but it will also equip future generations of designers to be better at developing the hard, rigorous theory design requires.

Design is an exciting powerful field, filled with promise. To meet the challenges of the 21st century, design and design education must change. So too must universities."

(Don Norman and Scott Klemmer, 25 March 2014)

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2014 • analytical techniques • analytical thinkingart and design education • behavioural sciences • call to actioncomplex phenomenacraft and materialscraft skills • creative insight • creative leaders • deductive reasoning • design academics • design and visual culturedesign artefactsdesign craftdesign curriculadesign curriculumdesign educationdesign education must changedesign facultydesign methodsdesign pedagogydesign studio educationdesign theory • design theory and practice • design thinkingdisciplinary specialisationDonald Normanexperimental methodsexperimental type design • finding and solving problems • formal design methodsfundamental principlesinductive reasoningintegrative practicesinterdisciplinary knowledge • LinkedIn Influencers (series) • material practicesmateriality of artefacts • mechatronics • people and society • people and technology • practical theory • practice and theorypractitioner wisdomquestioning traditionsScott Klemmersynthetic thinkingsystematic approachsystems thinking • technology and people • technology designtheory and practicetheory of designthinking toolsuncertain future • well-crafted design

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
18 NOVEMBER 2013

Donald Norman: what are affordances?

Fig. 1 Donald Norman (1994). "Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine" – CD–ROM from 1994.

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25 JUNE 2010

The concept of the craftsperson has moved far from the worlds of material practices

"Richard Sennett's seminal work on skills in society is an authoritative reference to this research (Sennett, 2008). His book asks two key questions: What are skills and what are the ways in which skills improve? He shows that there are three issues at the heart of what is involved in becoming a craftsman (someone who posses skills) today. That the concept of the craftsman has moved far from the worlds of material practices. Nowadays it includes computer programmers but there is continuity between those who worked with their hands in the physical world in the past to those who work in, for example the virtual world today! He argues skills are talked about and understood in a very narrow way and there is a limited sense of what we mean by being skilled."

(Robert Young, Elizabeth MacLarty, Kathryn McKelvey)

Sennett, R. (2008). The Craftsman. London, Penguin Books.

Young, R., E. MacLarty, et al. (2009). The Design Postgraduate Journeyman: Mapping the Relationship between Design Thinking and Doing with Skills Acquisition for Skilful Practice. International Association of Societies of Design Research.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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