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Which clippings match 'Richard Sennett' keyword pg.2 of 2
25 JUNE 2010

The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City

"The idea of an open city is not my own: credit for it belongs to the great urbanist Jane Jacobs in the course of arguing against the urban vision of Le Corbusier. She tried to understand what results when places become both dense and diverse, as in packed streets or squares, their functions both public and private; out of such conditions comes the unexpected encounter, the chance discovery, the innovation. Her view, reflected in the bon mot of William Empson, was that 'the arts result from over–crowding'. Jacobs sought to define particular strategies for urban development, once a city is freed of the constraints of either equilibrium or integration. These include encouraging quirky, jerry–built adaptations or additions to existing buildings; encouraging uses of public spaces which don't fit neatly together, such as putting an AIDS hospice square in the middle of a shopping street. In her view, big capitalism and powerful developers tend to favour homogeneity: determinate, predictable, and balanced in form. The role of the radical planner therefore is to champion dissonance. In her famous declaration: 'if density and diversity give life, the life they breed is disorderly'. The open city feels like Naples, the closed city feels like Frankfurt."

(Richard Sennett, 2006)

Fig.1 Busy street in Naples, marlenworld.com
Fig.2 Paris, Les Olympiades, 1969–1974, Thierry Bézecourt in 2005
[3] Sennett, R. (2006). The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City. Urban Age.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The concept of the craftsperson has moved far from the worlds of material practices

"Richard Sennett's seminal work on skills in society is an authoritative reference to this research (Sennett, 2008). His book asks two key questions: What are skills and what are the ways in which skills improve? He shows that there are three issues at the heart of what is involved in becoming a craftsman (someone who posses skills) today. That the concept of the craftsman has moved far from the worlds of material practices. Nowadays it includes computer programmers but there is continuity between those who worked with their hands in the physical world in the past to those who work in, for example the virtual world today! He argues skills are talked about and understood in a very narrow way and there is a limited sense of what we mean by being skilled."

(Robert Young, Elizabeth MacLarty, Kathryn McKelvey)

Sennett, R. (2008). The Craftsman. London, Penguin Books.

Young, R., E. MacLarty, et al. (2009). The Design Postgraduate Journeyman: Mapping the Relationship between Design Thinking and Doing with Skills Acquisition for Skilful Practice. International Association of Societies of Design Research.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The craftsperson animates the form through years of practice

"Creation, whether in art, research, teaching, or entrepreneurship, requires craft. Sociologist Richard Sennett (2008) suggests that, to be at its best, the craftsperson's deft use of tools and materials, combined with an intuition developed from years of practice, create reciprocity that animates the form. Sennett argues that the craftsperson, engaged in a continual dialogue with materials, does not suffer the divide of understanding and doing. The craftsperson must be patient, avoiding quick fixes. Good work of this sort emphasizes the lessons of experience through a dialogue between tacit knowledge and explicit critique (Sennett, 2008)."

(Liora Bresler, 2009, p.17)

Bresler, L. (2009). "University Faculty as Intellectual Entrepreneurs: Vision, Experiential Learning, and Animation." Visual Arts Research 35(1 Summer 2009).

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TAGS

2009 • animates the form • artcraftcraftspersoncreationcreative practice • deft use of tools • dialogue with materialsentrepreneurshipexperience • explicit critique • Liora Bresler • practiceresearchRichard Sennetttacit knowledgeteachingtruth to materials

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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