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19 AUGUST 2013

Steve Jobs at the Insanely Great conference in 1980

"22 minutes presentation given by Steve Jobs at the Insanely Great conference in 1980. It's one of the very first known video footage of Steve Jobs. The quality of the video deteriorates at mid–point, but stick around, it's really worth the watch.

The Insanely Great conference happened just a few months after Apple visited Xerox PARC. Now with retrospect, it's pretty clear when listening to Steve that Apple is working on the Macintosh. He hints a few times of it's development but doesn't disclose any secrets."

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TAGS

1980AppleApple Computer • Apple I • Apple IIAtaribicycles • Bob Metcalfe • building computers • building tools • Californiacomputer historyComputer History Museumcomputer skills • corporate name • Cupertino California • hardwareHewlett-Packard • Insanely Great Conference (1980) • interactive videoMacintoshMacintosh computerpresentation • Regis McKenna • SciAm • Scientific American (magazine) • software versus hardware • Steve Jobs • Steve Wozniak • technological changetechnological innovationtechnology companies • tool building • toolsVisiCalcXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2013

Marianne North: pioneering botanical artist

"Victorian artist Marianne North, one of the only women of her time to travel to places like the Seychelles Islands, Australia, and Chile, and who left behind a trail of impressive art and writing about her botanical discoveries, is not a household name. ...

In 1871, when a 40–year–old North set out after the death of her father to travel around the world and to paint as many of world's flora in oils as possible, she unwittingly found herself both ahead of and behind her times. In the art world, she was definitely not part of the avant–garde; in France, Claude Monet and Pierre–Auguste Renoir had already started their Impressionist paintings, creating works that were worlds away from the status quo of a polished depiction of nature.

North went around the world twice, in fifteen years, traveling by train, boat, mule, and on foot, to every continent, except for Antarctica. In Brazil, where she spent 13 months, North painted lush landscapes and tropical flowers with tight brushstrokes and clean lines – a style that would soon be left behind with the revolutionary style of the Impressionists. North didn't perceive or paint her subjects in a particularly unique way, but she relayed every minute detail of a plant, flower, or landscape with breathtaking precision. Her paintings give you a straight, dispassionate look at an unfamiliar world."

(Alexia Nader, Garden Design)

Fig.1 Marianne North, New Zealand Flowers and Fruit, Date painted: early 1880s, Oil on board, 50.9 x 35.4 cm, Collection: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

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187119th centuryaccuracyAotearoa New ZealandartistAustraliabiodiversity • botanical artist • botanical record • BrazilCaliforniaCharles DarwinChiledepiction • dispassionate look • Edward Lear • fidelityfloragarden design • George Eliot • IndiaJapanKew Gardens • Marianne North • natural history • natural landscape • nature • non-European species • Origin of Speciespainting • painting nature • phytotomypioneering womenplant anatomyplantsscientific illustrationscientific illustrator • Seychelles • Seychelles Islands • travel • travel writing • travelogue • tropical plants • UK • unfamiliar world • Victorian art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 SEPTEMBER 2011

Les Enfants Terribles: Illustrator Robert Williams

"This alternative art movement found its most congealing participant in one of America's most opprobrious and maligned underground artists, the painter, Robert Williams. It was this artist to brought the term 'lowbrow' into the fine arts lexicon, with his ground breaking book of 1979, The Lowbrow Art of Robert Williams. It was from this point, that the seminal elements of West Coast Outlaw culture slowly started to aggregate."

(Robert Williams)

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anthropomorphismartart and design practitionersart worldartistCalifornia • car culture • cartoonist • cinematic apocalypticism • comiccomic bookcomic book artistcounterculturecreaturedeviancefreaks • Gilbert Shelton • graphics • hot rod • hot rodding • illustrationillustrative styleillustratorinterviewJuxtapoz Magazine • Kenny Howard • Les Enfants Terribles • lowbrow • lowbrow art • Lowbrow Art Movement • painterphotocopypop culture artpop surrealismpop-culturepractitioner interviewpsychedelicpsychedelic imagerypunk • punk rock art • Robert Crumb • Robert Williams • Robt Williams • Salvador DalitransgressiontrashundergroundUSA • Von Dutch • Xerox • Zap Collective

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2010

Better Place Australia: zero emissions driving

"Better Place Australia is part of a global company dedicated to zero emissions driving. We will enable the mass adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) in Australia by providing the infrastructure and services that make it easy, affordable and attractive for motorists to adopt and drive electric vehicles.

The key barriers to the mass adoption of EVs in Australia, and globally, have been 'range anxiety', the cost and risk of battery purchase and the impact of EV charging on the electricity grid.

To overcome 'range anxiety' – the fear of EV drivers that their battery will run out of power – Better Place provides a personal charge spot at home, access to a network of charge spots at work and in public, access to 'instant recharge' through battery swap stations and in–car services to help drivers know when and where to recharge.

The system of battery swapping also helps overcome the cost and risk of battery purchase. The driver's subscription to Better Place covers use of a battery and the ability to swap and go at any swap station. Rather than pay upfront, drivers pay a monthly fee which covers their battery use. Better Place manages the risk and performance of the pool of batteries by tracking their capability and use through the battery swap stations.

Better Place manages the impact of EV charging on the electricity grid by using software that coordinates the charge spots so that the charging needs of customers are met within network capacity constraints. . This helps make the electricity grid more efficient and significantly reduces the need for additional generation, transmission and distribution infrastructure."

(Better Place, 2010)

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20082010Australiabattery • battery swap stations • battery swapping • Better Place • California • Cinema City • cleantech • consumptionDenmarkdesign intelligencedeviceefficiency • electric cars • electric vehicle network • electric vehicles • electricity • emission free • ethics • EV • Haifa • Hawaii • Holon • industrial designinfrastructureinnovationIsraelJerusalem • Kfar Sava • NissanOntarioOregonpeak oil • Pi-Glilot • range anxiety • Renault • Renault-Nissan alliance • renewable energy • Shai Agassi • solar arrays • solutionsustainabilitytechnologyTel Avivtransition • wind farms • zero emissions • zero emissions driving • zero-emission vehicles

CONTRIBUTOR

Lindsay Quennell
13 JUNE 2010

Open-ended play environments enable rich learning experiences

"Children learn about themselves, others and the world they live in through play. Outdoor environments for play and learning can provide rich experiences for children who seek fantasy and adventure and are innately curious about nature. Children's environments, particularly school and neighbourhood playgrounds, parks and gardens, have the potential to facilitate learning through social, emotional, cognitive and creative opportunities. Unfortunately, in America, the play and learning potential for many outdoor play spaces is underdeveloped."

(Lauri Macmillan Johnson)

Fig.1 The Adventure Playground, 160 University Avenue, Berkeley, California is an example of an open–ended play environment.

Fig.2 commercially available play environments often work to regulate engagement according to social norms.

[3] Johnson, L. M. (2004). American Playgrounds and Schoolyards – A Time for Change. In School of Landscape Architecture. Tempe, AZ, The University of Arizona Press.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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