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Which clippings match 'Story World' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 JANUARY 2014

A Game Bible is not a Game Design Document

"Some people confuse a game bible with a GDD [game design document]. Don't make this mistake. A show bible is a term taken from television production. The show bible's emphasis is on the rules of the world and the backgrounds and relationships of the characters. This is an important document to create, especially if information about your world and characters is going to be shared with other individuals (like those working on marketing materials such as websites, comic book adaptations, and merchandising) but remember that the game bible has nothing to do with gameplay. That's what the GDD is for. ...

A GDD is first and foremost about gameplay. How the character interacts with the world rather than relates to it; a subtle difference, but an important difference nonetheless. I find bibles important, especially when communicating your game's universe to other interested parties, but it really should be done after you have started to flesh out your GDD. "

(Scott Rogers, pp.72–75, 2010)

Rogers, S. (2010). "Level Up!: The Guide to Great Video Game Design", John Wiley & Sons.

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TAGS

2010adaptationbible (guide) • character relationships • document • game bible • Game Design Document (GDD) • game universe • game worldgameplay • marketing materials • merchandising • rulesshow biblestory worldtelevision production • world of the game • world of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2012

Alice: Madness Returns gameplay Demo.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
21 SEPTEMBER 2012

Screenwriting: the two worlds of your screenplay

"When we watch a movie, we enter a world created by the screenwriter. From the very first scene, events and characters begin to define a world, set in time and place, with implied values and social nuances. However, this initial world we see early on is only the first of two worlds that the screenwriter will create to tell the story."

(Charles Deemer, Film Underground)

Fig.1 publicity still for "Life of Pi"

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TAGS

call to action • catalytic moment • defining a world • entering a world • everyman • extraordinary world (screenwriting) • inciting event • leaving the ordinary world • main character • making choices • mise-en-scenenarrative theory • ordinary world (screenwriting) • passive protagonist • proactive characters • protagonist • reactive characters • screenwritingsetting • story moment • story world • time and place • world of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2012

Mercedes: Escape the Map

"In Escape the Map, an interactive UK effort by Mercedes Benz, consumers get to help a woman and her car escape a sinister Streetview version of Hong Kong. A TV spot directed by Carl Erik Rinsch directs viewers to a websitewhere they find 'Marie' and her C 63 AMG Coupe trapped in Streetview. Marie needs to escape from the map before her face is forever blurred–out, like everyone else who's pictured there. Participants must help crack the clues in order to be entered for a chance to win the car.

The campaign, aimed at attracting a younger consumer to the Mercedes–Benz brand, is by AMV.BBDO. It also includes a YouTube Homepage Takeover, bus advertising, and a cover wrap in free commuter newspaper Metro that uses augmented reality app Blippar."

(Creativity Online)

Fig.1 Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO London, Client: Mercedes, Director: Carl Erik Rinsch.

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TAGS

2011 • Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO London • adadvertising campaignaugmented reality • Blippar • brand • bus advertising • C 63 AMG Coupe • carcar ad • Carl Erik Rinsch • cover wrap • crack the clues • escape • Escape the Map • free commuter newspaper • Google StreetViewHong Konginteractiveinteractive adventureinteractive advertisinginteractive videoiPhone appmap • Mercedes Benz • Metro (newspaper) • newspaperstory worldStreetViewtrappedUKvisual literacyvisualisation • win the car • younger consumer • YouTube Homepage Takeover

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JUNE 2010

No character can exist without the context of a game world

"The role of the character in a role–playing game has long been debated. Yet no character can exist without the context of a game world. The character always has a relationship to its surroundings; the easiest way of creating a character is often through providing a context. Even if one supposedly plays oneself in a fictional world, a character – a variation on the ordinary persona – will soon emerge. "

(Markus Montola & Jaakko Stenros)

[2] Montola, M. and J. S. (eds) (2008). Playground Worlds – Creating and Evaluating Experiences of Role–Playing Games. Finland, Ropecon ry.

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TAGS

2008 • A Week in Finland • belongingcharactercollaborationcontextconventioncultural codesDenmarkengagementfictional worldFinlandgamegame world • Knudepunkt • Knutepunkt • Knutpunkt • LARPlive-action • live-action role-playing • NordicNorwayparticipationpersonaplayrole playingsocial interaction • Solmukohta • story worldstoryworldsurroundingsSwedenworld of the storyworld-building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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