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Which clippings match 'Authoring Tool' keyword pg.1 of 3
12 NOVEMBER 2013

Mozilla Webmaker: Popcorn Maker

"Popcorn Maker helps you easily remix web video, audio and images into cool mashups that you can embed on other websites. Drag and drop content from the web, then add your own comments and links –all within your browser. Popcorn Maker videos are dynamic, full of links and unique with every view."

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TAGS

authoring toolconsumer co-creationcontent integrationcultural democracydigital eradigital media creationdigital media designmedia amalgamationMozilla • Mozilla Persona • Mozilla Webmaker • multimediamultimedia authoring toolpopcorn • Popcorn Maker (tool) • remixabilitySoundCloud • timeline metaphor • video bloggingvideo creationvideo editingvideo mixingvideo on the webvideo publishingvideo software • video timeline • VimeoYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Rob Canning
20 JULY 2012

Veengle: online tool for creating video compilations

"You can create video compilations and share it with friends. You can share your created videos almost anywhere (e.g. to your website, your blog, other social networking websites).

During Beta stage, Veengle will handle only youtube videos. When the full version is ready, users will be able to upload their videos directly to Veengle."

(Veengle)

[This tool which was located at: http://www.veengle.com/about is longer in operation.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2010

E-learning 2.0: content is used rather than read and resembles language or conversation rather than a book or a manual

"What happens when online learning software ceases to be a type of content–consumption tool, where learning is 'delivered,' and becomes more like a content–authoring tool, where learning is created? The model of e–learning as being a type of content, produced by publishers, organized and structured into courses, and consumed by students, is turned on its head. Insofar as there is content, it is used rather than read– and is, in any case, more likely to be produced by students than courseware authors. And insofar as there is structure, it is more likely to resemble a language or a conversation rather than a book or a manual.

The e–learning application, therefore, begins to look very much like a blogging tool. It represents one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications–an environment rather than a system.

It also begins to look like a personal portfolio tool. The idea here is that students will have their own personal place to create and showcase their own work. Some e–portfolio applications, such as ELGG, have already been created. IMS Global as put together an e–portfolio specification. 'The portfolio can provide an opportunity to demonstrate one's ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on documents and sources of information. It is also a tool for continuing professional development, encouraging individuals to take responsibility for and demonstrate the results of their own learning'."

(Stephen Downes, 17 October 2005)

Fig.1 Andrey Nepomnyaschev, 'Six Seconds', LooksLikeGoodDesign.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2010

The Internet of the 90's was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction

"To be blunt [the Internet of the 90's] was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction. It was a web of sudden connections and personal links. Pages were built on the edge of tomorrow, full of hope for a faster connection and a more powerful computer. One could say it was the web of the indigenous...or the barbarians. In any case, it was a web of amateurs soon to be washed away by dot.com ambitions, professional authoring tools and guidelines designed by usability experts.

I wrote that change was coming 'soon' instead of putting an end date at 1998, for example, because there was no sickness, death or burial. The amateur web didn't die and it has not disappeared but it is hidden. Search engine rating mechanisms rank the old amateur pages so low they're almost invisible and institutions don't collect or promote them with the same passion as they pursue net art or web design.

Also new amateur pages don't appear at such amounts as ten years ago because the WWW of today is a developed and highly regulated space. You wouldn't get on the web just to tell the world, 'Welcome to my home page.' The web has diversified, the conditions have changed and there's no need for this sort of old fashioned behaviour. Your CV is posted on the company website or on a job search portal. Your diary will be organised on a blog and your vacation photos are published on iPhoto. There's a community for every hobby and question.

This is why I refer to the amateur web as a thing of the past; aesthetically a very powerful past. Even people who weren't online in the last century, people who look no further than the first 10 search engine results can see the signs and symbols of the early web thanks to the numerous parodies and collections organised by usability experts who use the early elements and styles as negative examples."

(Olia Lialina, February 2005)

Fig.1 Cyndi Howells. 'Cyndi's Genealogy Home Page Construction Kit'

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TAGS

1990s2005ad-hocaestheticsamateur • amateur pages • animated gifauthoring toolbox modeldesign for the screendesign formalismdesign historydigital culture • dot.com • experthistoryhome pageInternetmasterymedia artMIDInet artnew mediaOlia Lialinaparticipationpastiche • personal links • regulated space • regulationtransformationunder constructionusability • usability experts • usability guidelines • vernacularvisual communicationvisual designvisual languagevisual literacywebweb designweb vernacularwww

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2010

コミPo!...ComiPo! Manga Sequencer

"the Tokyo–based Web Technology Com Corp. held a press conference for their new software 「コミPo!」(AKA ComiPo!). This 'manga sequencer' – the first of it's kind for the PC – allows users to create their own Japanese comics with all the trimmings: character models, big eyes, facial expressions, panel layouts, dialogue, sound effects, speed lines, the works."

(Patrick Macias, 16 October 2010)

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TAGS

amateuramateur cultural productionauthoring toolcharactercomic book • ComiPo! • designdrawingfandomJapan • Keiichi Tanaka • manga • manga sequencer • otakuOtakulturepublishingremix culturescriptiblesequence designsoftwarevisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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