Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Virtual Spaces' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 JUNE 2015

A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space

"In the opening pages of her classic essay, A Room of Ones Own, Virginia Woolf describes being blocked from entering the 'turf' of the University in Oxbridge by an administrative gate-keeper.

Instantly a man's figure rose to intercept me. … His face expressed horror and indignation. Instinct rather than reason came to my help, he was a Beadle; I was a woman. This was the turf; there was the path. Only the Fellows and Scholars are allowed here; the gravel is the place for me' (Woolf, 1929).

This scene invokes the ways in which women have been systematically barred from the digital playground, both as players and as creators of play space. To a large extent, the video game industry in the U.S. remains dominated by a boys-only ethos that harkens back to the gender-biased practices in the British academia of Woolf's day.[1] Games that are female-friendly are often couched in derogatory or dismissive terms: The Sims (Maxis, 2000) is 'not really a game'; casual games are not counted as 'real' games by many in the industry.[2] The result is that certain types of games, game mechanics, play patterns, and, as we'll see, particular types of game spaces have tended to dominate the field of games.

Although this paper discusses the ways in which digital game spaces have been strongly gendered towards male constructions of space and play, this does not necessarily mean we advocate creating exclusively female (or 'pink') games. As Woolf points out in her essay, the solution is not simply to create a distinctly feminine voice (although this is one potential angle of approach), but rather to promote the cultivation of an 'androgynous mind', which, she suggests, is already possessed by male authors of great note throughout history (she cites Shakespeare as an example). We propose drawing from a number of cultural practices, literary sources, and existing games in order to pave the way for a playground that is more open to female players. Thus we promote not only the definition of new feminine game spaces, but also encourage designers to think in terms of 'androgynous space' that engages all aspects of all persons: a space into which women and girls are invited and welcomed, but in which men and boys can also enjoy more diverse and nuanced forms of play than are typically available to them."

(Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie and Celia Pearce, "A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space", The Fibreculture Journal : 11)

1

TAGS

2008 • A Room of Ones Own (1929) • androgynous mind • androgynous space • boys-only ethos • British academia • casual gamesCelia Pearce • concepts of space • contested spaces • cultural practices • dangerous spaces • digital game spaces • digital playgrounddigital spacedolls house • domestic spaces • emotional space • enchanted worlds • female games • female players • female-friendly spaces • feminine conceptions of space • feminine game spaces • feminine voiceFibreculture Journal • game design as cultural practice • game mechanic • game spaces • games industrygames research • gender-biased practices • gendered spaces • gendered technology • gendered voices • gendering game space • Jacquelyn Ford Morie • male authors • male constructions of play • male constructions of space • MMOG • narrative spaces • nuanced forms of play • Oxbridge • pink games • play patterns • play spaces • poetics of digital space • procedural space • real games • regendered play space • regendering game space • secret places • social spacesThe Sims (2000) • Tracy Fullerton • video games industryVirginia Woolfvirtual spacesWilliam Shakespeare • women and games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2013

ArtUp! Media Art in Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey

"ArtUP! is a multilingual portal for media art in Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey expresses the diversity of media art outlines current trends in and around media art fuels discussion about society processes and posts information about media art presents artists links up artists presents media artworks curates exhibitions initiates workshops ArtUP! is a project of the Goethe–Instituts in Ankara, Athens and Sofia."

1

TAGS

2013 • abstract fields • Adelina Popnedeleva • Afroditi Psarra • Albena Baeva • Ali Mahmut Demirel • Ali Miharbi • Alper Sen • Andreas Sitorengo • Angeliki Avgitidou • Angelo Plessas • Anna Lascari • Artemis Papageorgiou • ArtUP • artwork • Babis Venetopoulos • Bill Balaskas • Bill Psarras • Borjana Ventzislavova • Boryana Rossa • Boyan Dobrev • Bulgaria • Bulgarian media art • Burak Arikan • Can Altay • Candas Sisman • Caterina Antonopoulou • Costantino Luca Rolando Kiriakos • Cvetan Krastev • Daniela Kostova • Dimitris Charitos • Dimitris Fotiou • Ergin Cavusoglu • Erkan Ozgen • Esra Ersen • exhibition • Ferhat Ozgur • Genco Gulan • George Drivas • George Ruzhev • Goethe-InstitutGreece • Greek media art • Guven Incirlioglu • Hakan Akcura • Hakan Topal • HR-Stamenov • installation artinteractive art • Ioanna Myrka • Isil Egrikavuk • Iv Toshain • Ivan Moudov • Ivo Ivanov • Jenny Marketou • Kalin Serapionov • Kamen Stoyanov • Kiril Kuzmanov • Kleoni Manoussakis • Koken Ergun • Konstantinos Tiligadis • Koray Tahiroglu • Kosta Tonev • Kostas Daflos • Krassimir Krastev • Krassimir Terziev • Levent Kunt • Lina Theodorou • Luchezar Boyadjiev • Makis Faros • Maria Lalou • Maria Paschalidou • Maria Varela • Mariana Vassileva • Marianne Strapatsakis • Marinos Koutsomichalis • Medea Electronique • media art • Nadezhda Oleg Lyahova • Nancy Atakan • Neno Belchev • Neriman Polat • net artnew media art • new media art exhibition • Nezaket Ekici • Nil Yalter • NINA Kovacheva • Oktay Ince • Oleg Mavromatti • Panagiotis Tomaras • Panayiotis Kokoras • Panos Kouros • Pegy Zali • performance art • personal cinema • Petko Dourmana • Petros Moris • Rada Boukova • Raycho Stanev • rural spaces • Samuil Stoyanov • Sener Ozmen • Sibin Vassilev • Simge Hough • sound art • Stanimir Genov • Stefan Nikolaev • Svetlana Mircheva • The Erasers • Theodoros Giannakis • TurkeyTurkish media art • Tzeni Argyriou • urban spaces • Valentin Stefanoff • Vasilys Bouzas • Venelin Shurelov • Ventsislav Zankov • video artvirtual spacesvisual art organisation • Vladimir Mitrev • Volkan Senozan • Yiannis Melanitis • Zeyno Pekun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 JANUARY 2012

Imaging Research Center at the University of Maryland

"Since 1987 IRC researchers and students have been exploring the rapidly developing landscape of visual technology. Initial research involved high–end 3D computer animation to create rich worlds and characters. Visualizations of the otherwise invisible, ranging from biology to long–gone or unrealized architecture continue to be created at the IRC for national broadcast and current feature films.

As digital media tools became more powerful, the IRC began developing interactive, real–time virtual worlds that could respond to the decisions of an involved viewer. Researching and utilizing current game–art technologies, the IRC has created internationally recognized interactive visualizations for museums and other institutions. Additionally, pure research in real–time visualization has involved UMBC students in immersive projects that have attracted national attention.

Today, visualization capabilities have become all but limitless. At the same time, the role imagery plays in contemporary culture is of rising importance. Research at the IRC has expanded to include multidisciplinary research projects to better understand and realize an effective use of imagery to help culture process its most profound ideas. Understanding social media, online communities, and interactive collaborative virtual spaces are basic aspects of this research."

(Imaging Research Center, University of Maryland Baltimore County)

TAGS

19873D • 3D computer animation • animationapplied researchBaltimore Maryland • biology visualisation • character designcontemporary culturedesign researchdesign researcherdigital mediaexperimental knowledge • game art • game art technologies • gamesimagery • Imaging Research Center • immersion • interactive collaborative virtual spaces • interactive virtual worlds • interactive visualisations • IRCmuseumreal-time • real-time virtual worlds • real-time visualisationresearchresearch centreresearch projectresearchers • rich worlds • science visualisation • social media research • UMBC • undergraduate researchUniversity of Maryland • University of Maryland Baltimore County • virtual spacesvirtual worlds • visual technology • visualisation • visualisation capabilities • visualisations

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2010

Software is increasingly making a difference to the constitution and production of everyday life

"The reason that a focus on Web 2.0 is significant and needed is because the popular web applications it represents are driven by users providing endless and virtually unlimited information about their everyday lives. To put it in Lash's terms, they are clearly on the inside of the everyday, they are up close, they afford direct and routine connections between people and software. We have not yet begun to think through how this personal information might be harvested and used. A starting point would be to find out how this information about everyday mundane lives is being mined, how this feeds into 'relational databases', and with what consequences: the very types of question that are being asked by the writers discussed here. Alongside this it is also important that we consider how the information provided by users, and other 'similar' users, might affect the things they come across. If we return to Last.fm, which 'learns' users' tastes and preferences and provides them with their own taste–specific online radio station, it is possible to appreciate how the music that people come across and listen to has become a consequence of algorithms. This is undoubtedly an expression of power, not of someone having power over someone else, but of the software making choices and connections in complex and unpredictable ways in order to shape the everyday experiences of the user. How we find the books that shape our writing could be a question we might ask ourselves if we wish to consider the power that algorithms exercise over us and over the formation of knowledge within our various disciplines. (I know of at least two occasions when Amazon has located a book of interest for me that has then gone on to form an important part of a published work.) This is not just about Amazon, it would also include searches on Google Scholar, the use of the bookmarking site Del.icio.us, the RSS feeds we might use, or the likely coming applications that will predict, locate and recommend research articles we might be interested in. Readers based in the UK will also by now be considering the power of algorithms to decide the allocation of research funding as the role of metrics in the forthcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF) are finalized."

(David Beer, 996–997)

Beer, D. (2009). "Power through the algorithm? Participatory web cultures and the technological unconscious." New Media & Society 11(6).

1

TAGS

2009Amazon.com • blogjects • Bruce Sterling • coded objects • cognisphere • communicationcontent creation • context-aware • convergencecrisis of empiricism • cultural formations • cultural formsdatadata miningDel.icio.usdigital culturedynamic interfaceseveryday lifeflows • geodemographic classification • Google Scholarhuman agencyidentityinformationinformation society • intelligent devices • internet of thingsKatherine HaylesLast.fm • logjects • marketing discrimination • mediationmetadatamodes of being • modes of classification • modes of knowing • new media • new new media ontology • Nigel Thrift • old mediaperformative infrastructurespersonal data • post-hegemony • powerResearch Excellence FrameworkRFIDRoger BurrowsRSSScott Lashsocial bookmarkingsocial networkingsocial participation • software sorting • SPIMES • Steve Graham • technological unconscious • technology • transducting space • transformationubiquitous information flowsUKurban studiesvirtual spacesWeb 2.0William Mitchell

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.