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Which clippings match 'Digital Identity' keyword pg.1 of 2
26 SEPTEMBER 2013

Holiday Inn Express: ad illustrates split between real/online identities

"Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) is launching the first UK television advertisement for Holiday Inn Express to raise awareness of the added value services that differentiate the brand in the crowded mid–priced hotel market."

(Russell Parsons, 9 September 2013, Marketing Week)

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TAGS

2013added value • added value services • brand differentiation • breakfast • business traveller • Centaur Communications Ltd • comparisonconstructed identitiesdigital identity • Holiday Inn Express • hotel • hotel market • Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) • leisure industriesliving digital lives • Marketing Week (site) • mid-price market • online and offlineonline and real world identities • pastel shades • Premier Inn • price point • social media identitiessplit-screen • toothbrush • tv adUKUSPWiFi

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JANUARY 2013

Hyper-connectivity is transforming the nature of identity

"Social networks such as Facebook and on–line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, according to a report for the government's chief scientist. The report, published by Prof Sir John Beddington, says that traditional ideas of identity will be less meaningful. ... It states that the changing nature of identities will have substantial implications for what is meant by communities and by social integration.

The study shows that traditional elements that shape a person's identity, such as their religion, ethnicity, job and age are less important than they once were. Instead, particularly among younger people, their view of themselves is shaped increasingly by on–line interactions of social networks and on online role playing games.

The study found that far from creating superficial or fantasy identities that some critics suggest, in many cases it allowed people to escape the preconceptions of those immediately around them and find their 'true' identity. This is especially true of disabled people who told researchers that online gaming enabled them to socialise on an equal footing with others."

(Pallab Ghosh, 21 January 2013, BBC News)

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TAGS

2013civic engagementcountry of origincultural identitycyberpsychologyDepartment for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) • differently enabled • digital identitydisability and social networksethnicityflash mobs • Future Identities (report) • Government Office for Sciences Foresight • greater connectivity • hyper-connectivity • hyperconnectedidentity constructionidentity performanceinterlinked dataInternet • John Beddington • LARPoccupational identitiesonline and real world identitiesonline interactions • Pallab Ghosh • personal life • place in the world • religious identity • role playing gamessmart mobssmart phonesocial changesocial cohesion • social exclusion • social identity • social integration • social networking sitessocial networkstraditional society • work identities • workplace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2012

Network: our identities revealed through our network traffic

"Information technology has become a ubiquitous presence. By visualizing the processes that underlie our interactions with this technology we can trace what happens to the information we feed into the network."

(Michael Rigley)

Fig.1 "Network" by Michael Rigley.

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TAGS

animated presentationdata • data preservation • data retention • design situations • digital identitydigital representationinformation aesthetics • information feed • information sector • information technologyInternet trafficISP • location data • metadata • Michael Rigley • MMSnetwork informationnetwork traffic • our information • retention period • service provider • surveillancetechnology infrastructuretracetraffic analysistransactiontransaction data • ubiquitous presence • visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 SEPTEMBER 2011

Every click you make, Facebook tracker will be watching you

"Facebook also introduced new features aimed at marketing companies that let users monitor what their fellow members are watching and listening to online instantly. ...

'Retention of information online has always been a problem. If information comes and goes fleetingly there's less likelihood it will be used other than for the purpose you put it up, which is just to keep people in touch with what you're doing,' Mr Vaile said.

'This is in line with my concern about Facebook trying to change how people think and encourage them to normalise over–sharing and abandon any restraint on storage and use and exposure of private information.'"

(Andrew Colley, 24 September 2011, The Australian)

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TAGS

abandon restraint • autonomycommercial exploitationcommodifying myselfcommodityconductconstruction of normscontextcross-context sharing • cyber-communities • cyberspacedatadata matchingdemassificationdigital identity • digital maps • digital representation • digital signature • e-privacyethicsexposureFacebook • Facebook tracker • human interactioninformationinformation sharingmonitoringnormalisationnormalising over-sharingonlineownershippersonal informationprivacy • privacy watchdog • publicly availableretention of informationsocial networkingstoragetechnological innovation • they are watching you • timeline • Timothy Pilgrim • trackerUNSWuse of private information • use their information • what you are watching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2010

Google Street View Cars Peep Your Wi-Fi

"Nine days ago the data protection authority (DPA) in Hamburg, Germany asked to audit the WiFi data that our Street View cars collect for use in location–based products like Google Maps for mobile, which enables people to find local restaurants or get directions. His request prompted us to re–examine everything we have been collecting, and during our review we discovered that a statement made in a blog post on April 27 was incorrect.

In that blog post, and in a technical note sent to data protection authorities the same day, we said that while Google did collect publicly broadcast SSID information (the WiFi network name) and MAC addresses (the unique number given to a device like a WiFi router) using Street View cars, we did not collect payload data (information sent over the network). But it's now clear that we have been mistakenly collecting samples of payload data from open (i.e. non–password–protected) WiFi networks, even though we never used that data in any Google products.

However, we will typically have collected only fragments of payload data because: our cars are on the move; someone would need to be using the network as a car passed by; and our in–car WiFi equipment automatically changes channels roughly five times a second. In addition, we did not collect information traveling over secure, password–protected WiFi networks."

(Google, 14/05/2010 01:44:00 PM)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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