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04 MAY 2013

Consultation to reclassify and measure the UK Creative Industries

"The purpose of this consultation is to update the DCMS Creative Industries classification and we are inviting input from interested parties. We have been engaging with industry and partner organisations over potential changes via a Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council and are now at a point where we would like to go out to consultation and seek wider views.

We have been working with partners (NESTA, Creative Skillset and Creative and Cultural Skills), to review and update the classification used in the DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates (CIEE). We intend to use this review 'Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries', referenced below, as an objective starting point to suggest which occupations and industries should be included in the updated DCMS classification.

The review uses the idea of 'creative intensity' (the proportion of people doing creative jobs within each industry) to suggest which industries should be included. If the proportion of people doing creative jobs in a particular industry is substantial, above a 30% threshold, the industries are candidates for inclusion within the Creative Industries classification.

Similar to the outlook in our current Creative Industries Economic Estimates, the 'creative intensity' approach focuses on industries where the creative activity happens. The intention is to produce a classification which provides direct estimates of employment and the contribution to the economy, with no double counting – rather than attempting to capture all activity further down the value chain, for example, retail activities. The classification generated in this way can be used as a starting point for indirect estimates which include wider economic effects along the supply chain.

Any approach has data and methods constraints, which may affect some industries more than others. These limitations are reflected in the consultation and consultees are invited to suggest alternatives, supported by evidence–based argument. Weaknesses in the underlying classifications and data used to construct these estimates, which are identified by users, will be fed–back to the organisations which set these standards and provide these data so that we can influence longer–term improvements."

(Department for Culture, Media & Sport, 19 April 2013)

TAGS

2013 • CIEE • classificationclassification scheme • Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries • contribution to the economy • creative activity • Creative and Cultural Skills • creative industries • Creative Industries classification • Creative Industries Economic Estimates • creative intensity • creative jobs • creative occupations • Creative Skillset • data constraints • DCMS • DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates • Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • economic effects • estimate • estimation • evidence-based argument • government consultation • longer-term improvements • measurement • methods constraints • NESTAproposals • proposed changes • public consultationreview • SOC • Standard Occupational Classification • supply chain • Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council • UKUK Governmentvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2010

The Creative Industries KTN: the future of digital content

"This document has been created to help people understand the radical transformation digital content will have on the creative industries, and to provide businesses with outline areas of opportunity where innovation is most likely to occur.

In the past decade, digital content has become a part of everyday life for all. Yet the changes that will occur in the next 5–10 years will be profound. They have the power to alter the way we live, work, play, learn and help us to live longer, more fulfilling lives. These changes will substantially alter existing business models and markets.

Many historical innovations such as new recording formats, more powerful consoles and new advertising media were incremental. They changed formats and created new opportunities, but they did not alter the industrial landscape. The changes taking place now are paradigm shifts that challenge the value chain as a whole.

These changes represent huge opportunities, or threats if not understood. For games designers, it may mean the migration from console platforms to cloud based applications and casual gaming communities. For TV programmes it may mean the end of broadcast, where their content must be found and consumed on numerous devices. For publishers it may mean the migration to new consumption platforms that radically alter distribution channels. For industrial designers, it may mean the need to move from object creation to experience creation. For all it means the need to radically shift their thinking.

The following pages outline the key areas highlighted by a project that has engaged with hundreds of key stakeholders across the creative industries and technology industries seeking to map the landscape of the future of digital content."

(Kelechi Amadi, March 2010)

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TAGS

2010 • advertising media • Beacons for Innovation • broadcastingbusiness modelscasual gaming • casual gaming communities • cloud based applications • cloud computingconsoleconsumptionconsumption platformsconvergencecreative economycreative industriesCreative Industries Knowledge Transfer Networkdigital contentdistributioneconomic changeexperience creationformat • games consoles • historical innovations • industrial landscape • innovationKnowledge Transfer Networkknowledge-based economyKTNmarketsnew mediaold mediaparadigm shiftplatformsproduct designrecordingtechnology • technology industries • Technology Strategy Boardthe future of digital contenttransformation • TSB • TVUKvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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