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08 JANUARY 2014

Kafka's Wound by Will Self

"I am guilty of an association of ideas; or rather: I am guilty–that's a given, and in casting about for the source of my guilt I find I cannot prevent myself from linking one idea with another purely on the basis of their contiguity, in time, in place, in my own mind. It's not only ideas I connect like this, I do it with images, sensory impressions and the most epiphenomenal of mental glitches. Hume writes in his An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding that the imagination is best conceived of as a combinatorial faculty: there is nothing intrinsically imaginative about the idea of 'gold', nor the idea of 'mountain', but join them together and you have a fantastically gleaming 'gold mountain'. And might not that gold mountain be the Laurenziberg in Prague? After all, it looms over contemporary Prague–under its Czech language moniker, the Petřín–just as it loomed in the consciousness of Franz Kafka, whose earliest surviving narrative fragment, 'Description of a Struggle', is in part an account of a phantasmagorical ascent of its slopes: 'But now the cool light which precedes the rising of the moon spread over the mountain and suddenly the moon itself appeared from beyond one of the restless bushes. I on the other hand had meanwhile been gazing in another direction, and when I now looked ahead of me and suddenly saw it glowing in its almost full roundness, I stood still with troubled eyes, for my precipitous road seemed to lead straight into this terrifying moon.'"

(Kafka's Wound by Will Self)

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TAGS

associative • associative logic • between people and things • combinatorial faculty • contiguity • Czech language • Czech RepublicDavid Hume • epiphenomenal • essay • fantastically gleaming • Franz Kafkaglitch • gold mountain • hypermedia • idea association • imaginationinformation visualisationinterlinking • linking one idea with another • linking structure • London Review of Books • mental glitch • moonnodal structureorganisational relationship • Petrin • phantasmagoricalPraguerelatednessrhizomatic associationsrhizome • sensory impressions • similitude • Will Self

CONTRIBUTOR

Anna Troisi
18 JANUARY 2012

Glitch art: created purposefully through databending and corruption

"Data glitches are unavoidable. As technology gets more complex, it's easier and easier for a small bug to creep in and ruin your perfect data. But a growing number of artists in different fields are coming to value these glitches, and have begun attempting to insert them purposefully into their work using a technique called 'databending'.

'Glitch art' is a term that there's some debate over: Many argue that it can only apply when a glitch is unintentional –– when it occurs naturally due to an error in hardware or software that leads to the corruption of whatever it is the artist was trying to create.

But there are ways of intentionally inducing some of these glitches, a process called 'databending'. Databending draws its name from the practice of circuit bending –– a practice where childrens' toys, cheap keyboards and effects pedals are deliberately short–circuited by bending the circuit board to generate spontaneous and unpredictable sounds."

(Duncan Geere, 17 August 2010, Wired UK)

Fig.1 Don Relyea, "glitched out video".

Fig.2 David Szauder, "supra glitch".

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TAGS

aestheticisationaestheticsanalogue errorsartartefactingartefacts • bug • bugs • circuit bending • corrupting digital code • corrupting digital datacorruptioncraft as conceptdatadata glitchesdatabendingdegradationdesign formalismdigitaldigital culturedigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortionerrorexperimentationgenerativeglitchglitch aestheticsglitch artglitch practitionersglitched out videoglitches • glitschig • inducing glitches • malfunction • perfect data • purposeful glitching • randomnessreadymade • short-circuit • supra glitch • tech-arttechniquetechnologyunintentionallyunpredictability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Nina Wenhart's blog on the prehysteries of new media

"this blog is nina wenhart's collection of resources on the various histories of new media art. it consists mainly of non or very little edited material i found flaneuring on the net, sometimes with my own annotations and comments, sometimes it's also textparts i retyped from books that are out of print.

it is also meant to be an additional resource of information and recommended reading for my students of the prehystories of new media class that i teach at the school of the art institute of chicago in fall 2008.

the focus is on the time period from the beginning of the 20th century up to today."

(Nina Wenhart, 26/06/2008)

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TAGS

20th centuryAlan Turingapplied researchARarchiveArs Electronicaart • art + science • art + technologyart of codeartificial intelligenceartificial life • artistic molecules • artistic practice • artistic software • artistsASCIIASCII-Artatom • atomium • audiofiles • augmented realityavant-gardebody • Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE) • code art • cold warcollection • collection of resources • computercomputer animationcomputer graphicscomputer history • computer programming language • computer research • computer sculptureconcept artconceptual artconceptualisationconcrete poetry • copy-it-right • creative practicecritical theorycross-disciplinaryculture industrycuratingcurationcut-up techniquecybernetic artCybernetic Serendipitycyberneticscyberpunkcyberspacecyborgdata miningdata visualisationdesign research • dream machine • E.A.T. • early new media • Edward Ihnatowiczengineers • Eugen Roth • exhibitionsexpanded cinemaexperimental musicexperimentation • female artists and digital media • flaneur • flaneuring on the net • Fluxusfoundgenerative artgenetic artglitch • Gordon Pask • GPSgraffiti • Grey Walter • GUI • hackers and painters • hackinghacktivismHCIHerbert FrankehistorieshistoryhypermediahypertextIannis Xenakisimagineeringinformation theoryinsightinstructionsinteractive artinterdisciplinaryInternet • Ivan Picelj • Jack Burnham • Julije Knifer • Ken Rinaldo • kinetic sculpture • Lidija Merenik • live visualsmagic • Manchester Mark 1 • manifestomappingmediamedia archaeologymedia art • media art histories • minimalism • mother of all demos • mousemusical scorenetartnew medianew media art • new media exhibition • new media festival • Nina Wenhart • open sourceopen space • out of print • particle systems • Paul Graham • performance • phonesthesia • playlistpoetrypoliticspractice-led • prehysteries of new media • prehystories of new mediaProcessing (software)programmingprogramming languageprojectspsychogeographyradio artrare • re:place • real-timeresearch artefactresources • retyped • ridiculous • rotten + forgotten • SAIC • sandin image processor • School of the Art Institute of Chicagoscientific visualisation • screen-based • SIGGRAPHSituationistsslide projectorslit-scansoftwaresoftware studiesspeculative designspeculative research • Stewart Brand • surveillancetactical mediataggingtechniquetechnologytelecommunicationtelematic arttelematic experiencetext • textparts • Theo Jansentheoretical contexttheory buildingtimeline • Turing Test • ubiquitous computingunabomberundergraduate researchvideo artvideo synthesizervirtual realityvisual musicvisual research • Vladimir Bonacic • VRWalter Benjaminwearable computing • Williams Tube • world fair • world machine • Xerox PARCZKM • [Nove] tendencije

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2010

Interactive Google Doodle Celebrates Pac-Man's 30th

"Google transformed its ever–changing website logo into a game of Pac–Man on Friday to celebrate the game's impending 30th anniversary.

The company says that the widget, on the Google home page, is its first ever interactive, playable doodle. By pressing 'Insert Coin' where the 'I'm Feeling Lucky' button usually appears, you can start the game up and control Pac–Man with the arrow keys.

Insert two 'coins' and two players can play simultaneously, controlling Ms. Pac–Man with the WASD keys.

Google says the doodle will stay active for 48 hours. Much like the original game, it has been programmed to glitch and end at the 256th screen.

On May 22, 1980, Namco put the first Pac–Man arcade machine on location test in Shibuya, Tokyo."

(Chris Kohler, Wired Magazine, 21 May 2010)

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TAGS

1980 • 256th screen • anniversaryarcade machinecultural literacyculturedigital culturegameglitch • Google doodle • Google Inc • I'm Feeling Lucky • innovation • Insert Coin • interactiveJapanlogo • Namco • Pac-Manpioneering • playable doodle • WASD • widget

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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