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Which clippings match 'Entrepreneur' keyword pg.1 of 5
08 APRIL 2013

The Invisible Inflatable Airbag Bicycle Helmet by Hövding

"Fredrik Gertten profiles two idealistic young female entrepreneurs who created a revolutionary 21st–century design object everyone told them would be impossible to fashion."

(Focus Forward Films, 2012)

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TAGS

2005 • airbag • Anna Haupt • auto inflatable • bicycle • bicycle helmet • bikebusiness womencollisioncrashcrash testcrashworthinessdesign innovationdesign studentsentrepreneurentrepreneurship • Focus Forward Films • Fredrik Gertten • GE Focus Forward • helmethighway safety • Hovding • industrial design • inflatable airbag bike helmet • invention • invisible bicycle helmet • Lund UniversityMasters studentsproduct designproduct designerprotectionprototyperoad safetysafetysafety by designSwedishtechnical innovation • Terese Alstin • The Swedish Film Institute • WG Film • women designerswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Kino-mo: computer generated adverts on bicycle wheels

"Old Bond is an award winning, independent creative agency that helps to promote forward thinking brands in an innovative and exciting way. We provide tailored solutions with our unique technology – a breakthrough in outdoor advertising"

(Old Bond London Ltd., UK)

[Kino-mo were previously 'Old Bond']

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TAGS

2012advertising display • Art Stavenka • bicyclebicycle wheelsbike • computer generated ads • display advertisingdisplay technology • Dragons Den • entrepreneurentrepreneurshipinvention • Kyril • Old Bond London Ltd. • outdoor advertisingpromotiontechnical innovation • UCL • UCL Bright Ideas Awards • UK • unique technology • University College London

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2010

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

"The Berkman Center was founded to explore cyberspace, share in its study, and help pioneer its development. We represent a network of faculty, students, fellows, entrepreneurs, lawyers, and virtual architects working to identify and engage with the challenges and opportunities of cyberspace.

We investigate the real and possible boundaries in cyberspace between open and closed systems of code, of commerce, of governance, and of education, and the relationship of law to each. We do this through active rather than passive research, believing that the best way to understand cyberspace is to actually build out into it.

Our faculty, fellows, students, and affiliates engage with a wide spectrum of Net issues, including governance, privacy, intellectual property, antitrust, content control, and electronic commerce. Our diverse research interests cohere in a common understanding of the Internet as a social and political space where constraints upon inhabitants are determined not only through the traditional application of law, but, more subtly, through technical architecture ('code').

As part of our active research mission, we build, use, and freely share open software platforms for free online lectures and discussions. We also sponsor gatherings, ranging from informal lunches to international conferences, that bring together members of our diverse network of participants to swap insights – and sometimes barbs – as they stake out their respective visions for what the Net can become. We also teach, seeking out online and global opportunities, as well as supporting the traditional Harvard Law School curriculum, often in conjunction with other Harvard schools and MIT."

(Berkman Center for Internet & Society)

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TAGS

academic network • antitrust • applied researchBerkman Centerboundaries in cyberspace • closed systems • commercecommon understandingconceptualisation • content control • cyberspacediscoverydiscussionenquiryentrepreneurglobal opportunitiesgovernance • Harvard Law School • Harvard Universityinsightintellectual property • internet and society • internet as a social and political spacelaw • lawyers • MIT • Net issues • network of participants • online lectures • online opportunities • open systemsprivacyresearchresearch centre • share open software platforms • studentstechnical architecture • virtual architects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2010

Acquiring new media works

"Museologists face a new reality in our fast–changing high–tech world. Works with technological components pose unfamiliar challenges and require acquisition procedures that differ from traditional practices. Primarily, this means giving careful consideration to the notions of copyright (intellectual property), conservation and artist collaboration prior to the purchase of media–based art.

The Survey of New Media Cataloguing Practices report, produced by the DOCAM Cataloguing Structure Committee, indicates that few museum institutions have established a specific policy for acquiring new media works. Yet a policy of this sort is an important tool: used to assess the characteristics and short–, medium– and long–term conservation and exhibition needs of such works, it can help museums make informed choices when envisaging additions to their collections."

(DOCAM)

TAGS

acquisition procedures • acquisitionsadded value • artist collaboration • arts and innovationarts fundingcommercialismconservationcopyrightcreative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • DOCAM • DOCAM Cataloguing Structure Committee • entrepreneurexhibitionfunding • high-tech world • intellectual propertymarket failuremarkets • media-based art • museologymuseumnew media • new media works • patronpolicysocial gainsponsorship • Survey of New Media Cataloguing Practices • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
02 MARCH 2010

Reading ban on leaked Harry Potter

"Fourteen fans bought Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince from The Real Canadian Superstore in Coquitlam on the west coast of Canada before managers realised their mistake [selling books that were under embargo]. But readers will be unable to share their knowledge after Raincoast Books, the book's Canadian publisher, was granted a 'John Doe' injunction prohibiting the buyers from even reading their copies before the publication date.

The supreme court of British Columbia issued a court order preventing anyone from 'displaying, reading, offering for sale, selling or exhibiting in public' their books. J. K. Rowling's legal advisers said that the author was entitled to prevent buyers from reading their own books even though they had not broken the law.

'The fact is that this is property that should not have been in their possession,' said Neil Blair, a legal specialist for Christopher Little, the author's literary agent. 'Copyright holders are entitled to protect their work. If the content of the book is confidential until July 16, which it is, why shouldn't someone who has the physical book be prevented from reading it and thereby obtaining the confidential information? How they came to have access to the book is immaterial'."

(The Times Online)

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added valuearts and innovationarts fundingauthorbookBritish ColumbiaCanadacommercialismconfidentialcopyright • Coquitlam • creative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • embargo • entrepreneurfundingHarry Potter • Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince • JK Rowlingmarket failuremarketspatron • Raincoast Books • social gainsponsorship • The Real Canadian Superstore • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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