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Which clippings match 'Ultra-low-tech' keyword pg.1 of 2
10 SEPTEMBER 2015

Virtual reality is now a cereal toy

"It's sometimes hard to remember how far virtual reality has come in recent years. Not just in terms of technical achievement (though that's impressive), but also mainstream awareness. The idea of strapping a VR headset to your face is so common now, that Kellogg's is offering cardboard goggles with its breakfast cereal. A new promotion for Nutri-Grain in New Zealand lets customers construct their own headset from a cereal box, with the display provided by their smartphone. An official app offers access to a handful of 360-degree VR experiences including wingsuiting and a downhill mountain bike ride."

(James Vincent, 9 September 2015, The Verge)

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360 degree view • 360-degree VR experience • advertising and promotion • advertising promotion • Aotearoa New Zealandapp • breakfast cereal • cardboard goggles • cardboard headset • cardboard virtual reality goggles • cereal • cereal box • cheap solution • folded paper design • fully-immersive • Kelloggs • mainstream awareness • mobile phone • mountain bike ride • Nutri-Grain • promotional material • QR code • smartphoneultra-low-techusablevirtual realityvirtual reality experienceVR headset • wingsuit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2015

Build your own (smartphone enabled) cardboard Oculus Rift

"In the past week or so, you've probably heard about Google Cardboard, Google's lovably wry answer to the Oculus Rift. The Rift, of course, is a gadget that has gotten millions of dollars in funding and a multi–billion dollar Facebook buyout, and will cost hundreds of dollars at launch. Google Cardboard is a piece of cardboard with a couple of special lenses and a place to put a smartphone. Snickers and high fives were no doubt had.

The cool thing is that Google Cardboard is no joke—the rig actually provides a virtual reality experience when you use it with a smartphone and the Cardboard app. Well, now you can get a knock–off cardboard VR rig, and yes, we're living in a time when that's a real thing."

(Helena Stone, 30 September 2014, Chip Chick)

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2014accessible designassembly instructionscardboard • Cardboard app • cardboard headset • CardboardSDK iOS • Chrome VR Experiments • Damien Henry • David Coz • DIYDIY craftsfolded paper designfreely available • Google Cardboard • Google Cardboard SDK • Google I/O • head-tracking • head-worn display • headset • immersionimmersive experience • immersive virtual reality • iOS 8 • magnetometer • mobile VR headset • Oculus Rift • open development • OpenGLschematic diagramsmartphonestereoscopic • stereoscopic display software • ultra-low-techvirtual realityvirtual reality experienceVRVR headsetwearable devicesWebGL

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
31 DECEMBER 2014

Ultra low-fi Quake demake for analogue oscilloscope

"Programmer Pekka Väänänen has rendered a playable version of the classic first–person shooter Quake on an oscilloscope. Video game demakes – adaptations or ports that recreate a game in art styles or on hardware from before their time – have become trendy in recent years, but this demo is a particularly old–fashioned throwback. In 1958, physicist William Higinbotham created one of the first video games, a tennis simulation that ran on a Donner Model 30 analog computer and an oscilloscope display. That game used dots on a 2D plane; Väänänen's creation draws the shooter's 3D space in a style reminiscent of a high school student's sketch book."

(Chris Plante, 29 December 2014)

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2014analogue correspondence • Audio Stream Input-Output (ASIO) • crafts technology • Darkplaces Quake • electronic analogues • electronic rendering • fan gameFinnishfirst-person shooterFPS (games) • graphic animation • Hitachi V-422 oscilloscope • Jed Margolin • line geometry • low-filow-techopen sourceoscilloscope • Pekka Vaananen • portingProcessing (software)Quakerealtime generated visuals • realtime rendered • recreate a game • recreate favourite video games • recreationreinterpretationremediationrendered on the screenretrogamingrevisionism • software porting • technology repurposingultra-low-techvector artvideo game • video game adaptation • video game demake • video game remake • visual translation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JULY 2012

Caine's Arcade: a cardboard arcade made by a 9-year-old boy

"9–year–old Caine Monroy spent his summer vacation building an elaborate cardboard arcade inside his dad's used auto parts store. The entire summer went by, and Caine had yet to have a single customer. Then, on the last day of summer, a filmmaker named Nirvan stopped to buy a door handle for his car. Caine asked Nirvan to play, and Nirvan bought a $2 FunPass, becoming Caine's first customer. Inspired by Caine's creativity, Nirvan came back to make a short film about Caine's Arcade and organized a flashmob to surprise Caine with lots of customers."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2010

The Tailenders: missionary activity and global capitalism

"The Tailenders explores the connections between missionary activity and global capitalism. The Tailenders examines a missionary organization's use of ultra–low–tech audio devices to evangelize indigenous communities facing crises caused by global economic forces.

Joy Ridderhoff founded Gospel Recordings in 1939 in Los Angeles. She remembered how crowds had gathered around gramophones in the Honduran villages where she had worked as a missionary, and decided that rather than compete with this medium, she would use it to preach. The organization that she founded has now produced audio recordings of Bible stories in over 5,000 languages, and aims to record in every language on earth. They distribute these recordings along with hand–wind players in regions with limited access to electricity and media. The Bible stories played by the missionaries are sometimes the first encounter community members have had with recorded sound, and, even more frequently, the first time they have heard their own language recorded. Gospel Recordings calls their target audience 'the Tailenders' because they are the last to be reached by global evangelism.

The missionaries target communities in crisis because they have found that displaced and desperate people are especially receptive to the evangelical recordings. When uprooted from one's home, as in the case of Mexican migrant workers, the sound of one's own language is a comfort. And the audio players are appealing media gadgets. Audiences who might not otherwise be interested in the missionaries' message will listen to the recordings. The Tailenders focuses on how the media objects and messages introduced by the missionaries play a role in larger socioeconomic transformations, such as the move away from subsistence economies toward cash economies based on agricultural and industrial labor.

The film raises questions about how people who receive the recordings understand them. Gospel Recording's project is premised on a belief in the transparency of language to transmit a divinely inspired message. But because the missionaries don't speak the languages, they must enlist bilingual native speakers as translators. There is ample opportunity for mistakes, selectivity, and resistance in the translation. The film explores how meaning changes as it crosses language and culture."

(Adele Horne)

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19392006accessible design • Adele Horne • Biblecapitalismcardboard • cardboard record player • Cardtalk • Cardtalk player • Christiancommunities in crisiscommunitycultural insensitivitycultural signalsdisplacementdocumentaryeconomyemotive manipulationethics • evangelism • first encounter • First Nationsgadget • Global Recordings Network • globalisation • Gospel Recordings • gramophone • GRN • hand operated device • hand-wound • HondurasideologyIndiaIndigenousIndigenous communities • Joy Ridderhoff • languagelow-tech • media objects • Mexicomigrant workersmissionary • proselytisation • recordingreligionresponsibilitysocial changesocio-economicsociologySolomon Islandstechnology • The Tailenders (2005) • transformationultra-low-techvillagervoice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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